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Philip K. Dick

Philip K. Dick
Personal life[edit] The family moved to the San Francisco Bay Area. When Philip turned five, his father was transferred to Reno, Nevada. When Dorothy refused to move, she and Joseph divorced. Both parents fought for custody of Philip, which was awarded to the mother. Dorothy, determined to raise Philip alone, took a job in Washington, D.C., and moved there with her son. From 1948 to 1952, Dick worked at Art Music Company, a record store on Telegraph Avenue. Dick was married five times: Jeanette Marlin (May to November 1948)Kleo Apostolides (June 14, 1950 to 1959)Anne Williams Rubinstein (April 1, 1959 to October 1965)Nancy Hackett (July 6, 1966 to 1972)Leslie (Tessa) Busby (April 18, 1973 to 1977) Dick had three children, Laura Archer (February 25, 1960), Isolde Freya (now Isa Dick Hackett) (March 15, 1967), and Christopher Kenneth (July 25, 1973). Career[edit] Paranormal experiences and mental health issues[edit] Pen names[edit] Style and works[edit] Themes[edit] —Steven Owen Godersky

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_K._Dick

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