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Neil Gaiman

Neil Gaiman

http://neilgaiman.com/

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Artemis Fowl - Eoin Colfer This site uses some unobtrusive cookies to store information on your computer. Some cookies on this site are essential, and the site won't work as expected without them. These cookies are set when you submit a form, login or interact with the site by doing something that goes beyond clicking on simple links. The Enid Blyton Society Please step carefully — there are literally thousands of books and magazines here, going right back to Enid's early days. How many books do you think she wrote? How many of her short stories, plays, poems and non-fiction articles were published? How many compilations and continuations were published after her death? This is the place to find out! Feel free to browse around.

The Intricate, Cinematic World of 'Hugo Cabret' THE NEXT MORNING HUGO OPENED the toy booth and set it up exactly the way the old man always did. His fingers were still hurting badly, but he smiled as the customers straggled by and he collected the money. Still, there were long stretches of quiet. Hugo was frustrated at not being able to draw or play with any of the mechanical parts. He tried to teach himself to write with his left hand, but it didn't work. He looked closely at the windup toys. Math 101: A reading list for lifelong learners Ready to level up your working knowledge of math? Here’s what to read now — and next. Math 101, with Jennifer Ouellette

Supernatural Fiction Supernatural fiction (properly, "supernaturalist fiction"[1]) is a literary genre exploiting or requiring as plot devices or themes some contradictions of the commonplace natural world and materialist assumptions about it. In its broadest definition, supernatural fiction includes examples of weird fiction, horror fiction, fantasy fiction, and such sub-genres as vampire literature and the ghost story. Elements of supernatural fiction can be found in writing from genres such as science fiction. Amongst academics, readers and collectors, however, supernatural fiction is often classed as a discrete genre defined by the elimination of "horror", "fantasy" and elements important to other genres.[1] The one genre supernatural fiction appears to embrace in its entirety is the traditional ghost story.[2] In the twentieth century, supernatural fiction became associated with psychological fiction. The result is that the supernatural is only one possible explanation for what has been described.

Ann Brashares biography, plus links to book reviews and excerpts. Ann Brashares Biography Ann Brashares grew up in Chevy Chase, Maryland with her three brothers and attended a Quaker school in the DC area called Sidwell Friends. She studied Philosophy at Barnard College, part of Columbia University in New York City. Expecting to continue studying philosophy in graduate school, Ann took a year off after college to work as an editor, hoping to save money for school. Loving her job, she never went to graduate school, and instead, remained in New York City and worked as an editor for many years. A Christmas Carol - by Charles Dickens - Awesome Stories To help provide for his growing family, Charles Dickens wrote A Christmas Carol over a period of three weeks in 1843. Creating the characters of Ebenezer Scrooge, Jacob Marley, Bob Cratchit and Tiny Tim, Dickens also made famous the descriptive word "Humbug!" His tale of transformation is still popular during the holiday season and has often been produced for film. This version, from 1984, features George C. Scott as Ebenezer and Frank Finlay as Jacob Marley. In this scene, "Old Marley" (who was "dead as a door nail"), visits Scrooge to warn him about the way he is living his life.

8 Tips For Creating Great Stories From George R.R. Martin, Junot Diaz, And Other Top Storytellers What the hell is a Story Lizard? In Wonderbook: The Guide to Creating Imaginative Fiction (Abrams Books, October 15), Story Lizards join Prologue Fish and other infographic helpmates designed to banish dry textual analysis in favor of a kicking, screaming, slithering approach to storytelling creativity. Author Jeff Vandermeer, a three-time Fantasy World Award-winning novelist who co-directs the Shared Worlds teen writing camp, says "The way we're taught to analyze fiction is to break down and do a kind of autopsy. But I think writers need to be more like naturalists or zoologists when they study story because then you're looking at how all the elements fit together." Enter the Story Lizard, above, illustrated by Jeremy Zerfoss. As Vandermeer tells Co.Create, "A recurring thing in Wonderbook is to think of stories as being more like living creatures than machines."

The Subtle Knife Plot summary[edit] Lyra revisits Dr. Malone the next day, but after accepting a ride from the well-dressed Sir Charles Latrom, she discovers that Sir Charles has stolen her alethiometer and she asks Will to help her retrieve it. Nick Butterworth books - Children's Author on Lovereading4kids.co.uk Nick Butterworth was born in Kingsbury, North London in 1946, but moved to Romford in Essex with his parents at the age of three. They moved to run a sweet shop, so Nick found himself fulfilling every child's sugar-coated dream of growing up right inside the proverbial chocolate factory. Having intended to go to art college after leaving school, Nick decided to take a job as a typographic designer in the printing department of the National Children's Home at the last minute instead. He went on to work for several major London design consultancies before moving into freelance graphics.

Lord of the Flies Before The Hunger Games, there was William Golding's 1954 Lord of the Flies. Well, okay, before there was The Hunger Games, there was reality TV and the 1996 Japanese novel (and later move) Battle Royale. But you have to admit, the premise is similar: a bunch of kids end up on an island/ arena and turn into vicious savages in about, oh, five minutes. Just like The Hunger Games, Lord of the Flies was a great success—although we're not convinced that Suzanne Collins is going to follow in William Golding's steps by winning a Nobel Prize for Literature for "illuminat[ing] the human condition of the world today." The Amber Spyglass The Amber Spyglass is the third and final novel in the His Dark Materials series, written by English author Philip Pullman, and published in 2000. The Amber Spyglass won the 2001 Whitbread Book of the Year award, a British literature award, making it the first children's novel to receive the honour.[1] It was named Children's Book of the Year at the 2001 British Book Awards, and was also longlisted for the Man Booker Prize, again the first time this had happened to a children's book.[2] Plot[edit] At the end of The Subtle Knife, Marisa Coulter captured Lyra.

Bob Graham - Authors & Illustrators - Welcome to Walker Books Australia Bob Graham has written and illustrated many children’s picture books. He was born in Sydney, and studied at the Julian Ashton Art School. His books are well known for their simplicity and humour, told from children’s perspectives, including “Oscar’s Half Birthday,” “Buffy,” ( Smarties Book prize silver award winner) and “Let’s Get a Pup” ( shortlisted for the 2002 Kate Greenaway medal; winner Boston Globe-Horn book award.)

Of Mice and Men Adults can't decide if they want to require you to read John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men—or make that sure you never even pick it up. Since it was published in 1937, it's been banned about as often as it's been assigned. Why?

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