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George Orwell - The Orwell Prize

George Orwell - The Orwell Prize

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Interview with Alan Moore It was no easy feat getting in touch with Alan Moore. For a man who’s not afraid to speak his mind, he doesn’t like publicity. But when you get him talking, he has much to say. Moore is one of the most influential living comic-book writers, and his work has defined modern superhero comics in ways that are so enfolded into the industry that it’s hard to parse them anymore. For over thirty years he has put out a continuous stream of comics, from superheroes to Jack the Ripper to erotica. Moore’s reimagining of Swamp Thing in the early 1980s made horror comics their own industry just when publishers had all but given up on a comic subgenre that had once been the cause of the now much-belied Comics Code.

Meet the Two American Companies Helping Egypt Restrict Its People - Culture Although snuffing out dissent and cutting citizens off from the world aren't actions generally associated with the American ideal, two U.S. companies are helping the Egyptian government do just that as populist protests continue shaking the African nation. The tear gas and smoke grenade manufacturer Combined Systems, Inc. is based out of Jamestown, Pennsylvania. But its wares have been showing up all over the Middle East as of late. On January 20, a photographer with the Eurpean PressPhoto agency was killed when a CSI tear gas canister struck him in the head at a protest in Tunisia. And throughout yesterday and today, CSI smoke bombs and tear gas have clogged the air and lungs in Cairo.

Kurt Vonnegut at the Blackboard Voices in Time I want to share with you something I’ve learned. I’ll draw it on the blackboard behind me so you can follow more easily [draws a vertical line on the blackboard]. This is the G-I axis: good fortune-ill fortune. Death and terrible poverty, sickness down here—great prosperity, wonderful health up there. Your average state of affairs here in the middle [points to bottom, top, and middle of line respectively]. Interview with Maurice Sendak Things still worth caring about, near the end of a life:Peace and quiet, helping young artists, The Odyssey, Marcel Proust, Henry James, George Eliot, Franz Schubert, Samuel Palmer, William Blake, the ancients, William Shakespeare, John Keats, all the people you love passionately, telling the truth, love affairs, noses I went to see Maurice Sendak last year at his home in Connecticut. The eighty-three-year-old was promoting his latest book, Bumble-Ardy, about an orphaned pig whose ninth-birthday festivities are gate-crashed by teenage swine. He came to the door with his dog, Herman (after Melville), and for the next two hours was everything one might expect him to be: furious, caustic, darkly hilarious, and, above all, warm about life and love and what matters most. After his death, in May, much was written about Sendak’s legendary crossness, but it was really just impatience with artifice.

Inside the State Department’s Arab Twitter diplomacy The State Department has been working furiously and mostly behind the scenes to cajole and pressure Arab governments to halt their clampdowns on communications and social media. In Tunisia there seem to have been real results. In Egypt, it's too soon to tell. Ever since the State Department intervened during protests by the Iranian Green movement in June 2009, convincing Twitter to postpone maintenance so opposition protestors could communicate, the U.S. government has been ramping up its worldwide effort to set up a network of organizations that could circumvent crackdowns on Internet and cell phone technologies by foreign governments. That effort faced its first two major tests over the last few weeks and the State Department has been working with private companies, non-governmental organizations, and academic institutions to activate this network and put it to use in real time. "This was not a Twitter revolution.

Interview w DFW Context N°21 Shimon Ballas. Outcast. Trans. Ammiel Alcalay and Oz Shelach. Nietzsche Is Dead Count Harry Kessler received the news in the officers’ mess of his army regiment from a fellow officer going through dispatches. On October 25, 1900, Friedrich Nietzsche, who had famously announced the death of God, had himself died. During the previous decade, Nietzsche’s writings had taken German culture by storm. One of Kessler’s friends joked that “six educated Germans cannot come together for a half hour without Nietzsche’s name being mentioned.” Nietzsche had become a hero—and cult figure—to those who wanted to reimagine Germany; and a villain to those who remained attached to Germany’s Protestant roots and traditional order. The philosopher’s tragic decline only added to his mystique.

The Witch Hunt Against Assange Is Turning into an Extremely Dangerous Assault on Journalism Itself December 17, 2010 | Like this article? Join our email list: Stay up to date with the latest headlines via email. Whatever the unusual aspects of the case, the Obama administration’s reported plan to indict WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange for conspiring with Army Pvt. Bradley Manning to obtain U.S. secrets strikes at the heart of investigative journalism on national security scandals. Arthur Rimbaud’s Brief Career On a winter day in 1883, aboard a steamer that was returning him from Marseilles to the Arabian port city of Aden, a French coffee trader named Alfred Bardey struck up a conversation with a countryman he’d met on board, a young journalist named Paul Bourde. As Bardey chatted about his trading operation, which was based in Aden, he happened to mention the name of one of his employees—a “tall, pleasant young man who speaks little,” as he later described him. To his surprise, Bourde reacted to the name with amazement. This wasn’t so much because, by a bizarre coincidence, he had gone to school with the employee; it was, rather, that, like many Frenchmen who kept up with contemporary literature, he had assumed that the young man was dead.

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Margaret Atwood I kicked off the morning I was scheduled to interview Margaret Atwood with some Knob Creek bourbon, immediately following my morning coffee. My Facebook post that morning: So it’s okay to drink bourbon at 9:08 in the morning if you’re about to call Margaret Atwood, right? A surplus of 100 people quickly “liked” this, many leaving comments assuring me I was on the right—nay, mandatory—track, imbibing. Thankfully, I had the prescience of mind not to tweet my behavior since, among literary writers, Margaret Atwood is reigning queen of the Twittersphere, and her 370,000+ followers might not have appreciated that she was about to be interviewed by a starstruck fan who was drunk before breakfast.

A computational journalism reading list [Last updated: 18 April 2011 -- added statistical NLP book link] There is something extraordinarily rich in the intersection of computer science and journalism. It feels like there’s a nascent field in the making, tied to the rise of the internet. The last few years have seen calls for a new class of “programmer journalist” and the birth of a community of hacks and hackers. Meanwhile, several schools are now offering joint degrees.

de Beauvoir In Which We Prefer To Be Simone De Beauvoir Paris Girl by ELLEN COPPERFIELD What is an adult? A child blown up by age. Young Simone de Beauvoir shared her room with the maid. Outside her family's Paris apartment was the Boulevard Raspail and the Boulevard du Montparnesse. Harper's Magazine: Tense Present. A Dictionary of Modern American Usage, by Bryan A. Garner. Oxford University Press, 1998. 723 pages. $35. A Dictionary of Modern English Usage, by H.

Leaked Labour email: lay off Murdoch An email, forwarded on behalf of Ed Miliband's director of strategy, Tom Baldwin, to all shadow cabinet teams warns Labour spokespeople to avoid linking hacking with the BSkyB bid, to accept ministerial assurances that meetings with Rupert Murdoch are not influencing that process, and to ensure that complaints about tapping are made in a personal, not shadow ministerial, capacity. The circular, sent by a Labour press officer on 27 January, states: "Tom Baldwin has requested that any front-bench spokespeople use the following line when questioned on phone-hacking. BSkyB bid and phone-tapping . . . these issues should not be linked. One is a competition issue, the other an allegation of criminal activity."

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