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Teacher & Student Planners

Teacher & Student Planners
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Ten Terrific Mind Mapping and Brainstorming Tools Today, I am running a workshop about using mind mapping and brainstorming tools to help students meet some of the Common Core standards in English Language Arts. Below are some of the tools that we will be using today. On a related note, if you're interested in having me come to your school or facilitate a virtual workshop, please click here for more information. Popplet is a great service that combines the best of online sticky note services like Wallwisher with collaborative mind mapping functions. Popplet allows you to create a wall of multimedia sticky notes that you can share with others. Text 2 Mind Map offers a great way to turn your typed outlines into mind maps. Realtime Board is a new online tool for hosting online, collaborative brainstorming sessions. Inkflow is an iPad app for visual thinkers who like to sketch to process what they're hearing, seeing, and learning. iBrainstorm is a free brainstorming application for the iPad and the iPhone.

I Won't Hire People Who Use Poor Grammar. Here's Why. - Kyle Wiens by Kyle Wiens | 8:02 AM July 20, 2012 If you think an apostrophe was one of the 12 disciples of Jesus, you will never work for me. If you think a semicolon is a regular colon with an identity crisis, I will not hire you. Some might call my approach to grammar extreme, but I prefer Lynne Truss’s more cuddly phraseology: I am a grammar “stickler.” Now, Truss and I disagree on what it means to have “zero tolerance.” Everyone who applies for a position at either of my companies, iFixit or Dozuki, takes a mandatory grammar test. Of course, we write for a living. iFixit.com is the world’s largest online repair manual, and Dozuki helps companies write their own technical documentation, like paperless work instructions and step-by-step user manuals. But grammar is relevant for all companies. Good grammar makes good business sense — and not just when it comes to hiring writers. On the face of it, my zero tolerance approach to grammar errors might seem a little unfair. Wrong.

The Math Forum - Ask Dr. Math Ask Dr. Math® Thank you for your interest in Ask Dr. Math. [Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use] Math Forum Home || Math Library || Quick Reference || Math Forum Search How To Make Students Better Online Researchers I recently came across an article in Wired Magazine called “ Why Kids Can’t Search “. I’m always interested in this particular topic, because it’s something I struggle with in my middle and high school classes constantly, and I know I’m not alone in my frustrations. Getting kids to really focus on what exactly they are searching for, and then be able to further distill idea into a few key specific search terms is a skill that we must teach students, and we have to do it over and over again. We never question the vital importance of teaching literacy, but we have to be mindful that there are many kinds of “literacies”. An ever more important one that ALL teachers need to be aware of is digital literacy. I could go off in many directions on this, but for the purpose of this post I’m focusing strictly on the digital literacy of searching. As they get older, kids often employ the tactic of typing a question into the search bar – “How do I find out about mummies in Egypt?” The real answer? 1.

Skills4Study.com: Handy Tips Home > Handy Tips > Presentations Having to give presentations is a common component of a degree course. Sometimes, this is a non-assessed exercise in front of just a few people, or it can be an assessed presentation in front a whole lecture theatre. Don’t panic though! For more advice, see also presentation skills and the free audio download on presentation skills. Six important things to remember when you are giving a presentation 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Group presentations Do: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Don't: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. For more advice, see working with others. Using PowerPoint Do: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Don't: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. This content has been written by Joan van Emden and Lucinda Becker, authors of Presentation Skills for Students.

DebateGraph DebateGraph is an award-winning, web-platform for visualizing and sharing networks of thought – and opening reasoning and action to collaborative learning and iterative improvement.Create your own maps and explore and contribute to maps created by amongst others: CNN, the White House, the UK Prime Minister's Office, The Independent, and the Foreign Office. DebateGraph is being used in over 100 countries and helping people reason and learn together more effectively in many different fields, including: education, health, governance, media, publishing, environment, conflict resolution, conferences, group facilitation, and public consultation and planning.There's no limit to the number of people who can collaborate on maps, and you are welcome to start building and sharing public and private maps on any topic now. Copyright © 2014 Thoughtgraph Ltd.

Five-Minute Film Festival: Teaching Digital Citizenship "Digital citizenship" is an umbrella term that covers a whole host of important issues. Broadly, it's the guidelines for responsible, appropriate behavior when one is using technology. But specifically, it can cover anything from "netiquette" to cyberbullying; technology access and the digital divide; online safety and privacy; copyright, plagiarism, and digital law, and more. But while there is much talk about the importance of teaching digital citizenship in this information society, not many are sure what that really looks like. Video Playlist: Teaching Digital Citizenship Watch the player below to see the whole playlist, or view it on YouTube. What is Digital Citizenship? More Resources for Learning About Digital Citizenship While we haven't solved the problem of finding time in the schedule to teach these essential topics, there is a wealth of great free resources to be found -- many of them aligned to standards, either the Common Core ELA standards, or ISTE's NETS, or both.

Anxious About Tests? Tips to Ease Angst As any parent or teacher knows, tests can create crippling anxiety in students–and anxious kids can perform below their true abilities. But new research in cognitive science and psychology is giving us a clearer understanding of the link between stress and performance, and allowing experts to develop specific strategies for helping kids manage their fears. These potential solutions are reasonably simple, inexpensive and, as recent studies show, effective. Some work for a broad range of students, while others target specific groups. Yet they’re unfamiliar to many teachers and parents, who remain unaware that test anxiety can be so easily relieved. Here, three such approaches: When students feel nervous, their capacity to think clearly and solve problems accurately is reduced, says Sian Beilock, a cognitive scientist at the University of Chicago. While one might imagine writing about a looming exam would only heighten students’ anxiety, Beilock says the opposite was the case.

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