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21st Century Literacies: Tools for Reading the World

21st Century Literacies: Tools for Reading the World
In Intelligence Reframed Howard Gardner contends that "literacies, skills, and disciplines ought to be pursued as tools that allow us to enhance our understanding of important questions, topics, and themes." Today's readers become literate by learning to read the words and symbols in today's world and its antecedents. They analyze, compare, evaluate and interpret multiple representations from a variety of disciplines and subjects, including texts, photographs, artwork, and data. Basic Language Literacy Visual Literacy Spatial Literacy Three Information Literacy Questions to Ask About a Map: Handout Historical Literacy Cultural Literacy Information Literacy Political Literacy and News Media Literacy Scientific Literacy Mathematical Literacy Related:  IL

Museum Box Homepage 12 Things Students Should Never Do on Social Media The last thing young people want is another set of rules. But these days, social media comes with great responsibility, whether you're just starting high school or finishing up college. The fact is, irresponsible social media conduct could potentially ruin your education and negatively impact your career, not to mention hurt others in the process. (And we're not just talking kids, either.) We've pinpointed 12 social media mistakes that students should avoid at all costs, because after all, it's never as simple as "be responsible." Please head to the comments below to add your own contributions and advice for young adults on social media. 1. Granted, high school and college students experiment with many activities and substances. Once or twice per year, perform a thorough review of the information and content accessible on your social media profiles. 2. Bullying is one of the most serious problems in schools today. SEE ALSO: Why You Should Talk to Kids About Cyberbullying [INFOGRAPHIC] 3.

How I built a culture of reading in my classroom « Teaching the Teacher Image by CaptPiper used under creative commons licence Of all the accomplishments I’ve made in my second term of teaching the one I am most proud of is building a reading culture in my class. This may sound weird as most people seem to assume that geeks eschew books in favour of gadgets. While I have proclaimed my love for my iphone, I also understand the power of books. There’s something magical about cracking the spine on a brand new book or the smell that comes from picking up a treasure found in the back of a second-hand bookstore. Towards the end of my course last year I felt woefully under-prepared to teach senior literacy when @Kathryntrask reviewed the Book Whisperer on her blog. The Daily 5 gave me some concrete classroom management strategies in order to build the classroom environment which supports the student-selected reading. As part of the challenge each week the students write a letter reflecting on their progress. There is a downside to all this reading. Like this:

15 Oxymorons& An oxymoron is a combination of words that contradict each other. Here are some of our favorites. 1. virtual reality 2. original copy 3. old news 4. act naturally 5. pretty ugly 6. living dead 7. jumbo shrimp 8. rolling stop 9. constant variable 10. exact estimate 11. paid volunteers 12. civil war 13. sound of silence 14. clever fool 15. only choice Helen Davies, Marjorie Dorfman, Mary Fons, Deborah Hawkins, Martin Hintz, Linnea Lundgren, David Priess, Julia Clark Robinson, Paul Seaburn, Heidi Stevens, and Steve Theunissen All Aboard!: Implementing Common Core offers school librarians an opportunity to take the lead. By Rebecca Hill, 3/30/2012 OK, so school librarians weren’t invited to the party. When members of the National Educational Association, the National Council for Teachers of English, the International Reading Association, and the American Federation of Teachers met in 2010 to draft new benchmarks for language arts and literacy for our nation’s K–12 schools—the Common Core Curriculum State Standards (www.corestandards.org)—there weren’t any media specialists at the table. Even though school librarians have been longtime champions of information literacy, reading, and critical thinking—all prime pieces of Common Core—we weren’t asked for our input. And two years later, things still aren’t looking up for many of us. As a growing number of states and large school systems, including those in New York City, Boston, Cleveland, and Philadelphia, grapple with plans to implement the ambitious new standards, school librarians still aren’t consistently invited to pull up a chair. It’s a worthy goal.

Linear Perspective: Filippo Brunelleschi's Experiment An introduction to Filippo Brunelleschi's experiment regarding linear perspective, c. 1420, in front of the Baptistry in Florence Speakers: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker Brunelleschi and the Rediscovery of Linear Perspective Before looking at painting in the Early Renaissance, we need to learn about the discovery or rediscovery of linear perspective sometime close to 1420 by Filippo Brunelleschi (rediscovery, because the ancient Greeks and Romans may have understood linear perspective too, but if so, knowledge of it was lost during the Middle Ages). Linear perspective is a way of creating a convincing, perfect illusion of space on a flat or two-dimensional surface. Diagram of the main elements of linear perspective—horizon line, vanishing point, and orthogonals.

Inquiry-based Learning: Explanation What is inquiry-based learning? An old adage states: "Tell me and I forget, show me and I remember, involve me and I understand." The last part of this statement is the essence of inquiry-based learning, says our workshop author Joe Exline 1. Inquiry implies involvement that leads to understanding. Furthermore, involvement in learning implies possessing skills and attitudes that permit you to seek resolutions to questions and issues while you construct new knowledge. "Inquiry" is defined as "a seeking for truth, information, or knowledge -- seeking information by questioning." A Context for Inquiry Unfortunately, our traditional educational system has worked in a way that discourages the natural process of inquiry. Some of the discouragement of our natural inquiry process may come from a lack of understanding about the deeper nature of inquiry-based learning. Importance of Inquiry Memorizing facts and information is not the most important skill in today's world. The Application of Inquiry

Total Cruft Abandon all hope: 39 ways to die! [Updated with new insights] Growing up, the first taste I had for interactive media was through “Choose Your Own Adventure” books, which ended each scene with a choice that the reader must make. One choice may continue the plot-line, one might take you on a tangent, and the third would lead to certain doom. Each book varied dramatically in complexity and usually boasted on the front cover the vast number of possible endings… of which, most were death or detention. I loved those books. Given that Twitter limits all content to just 140 characters, how could anyone write a meaningful narrative, much less an interactive one? Planning Obviously the story would have to be broken across multiple tweets and linked by shortened URLs. Then, I needed a way to efficiently write and edit in only 140 characters. Chapter One--SPOILERS! Enter Apple’s Numbers app. Changing Background Images So that’s what I did. In my case, I wanted seven different backgrounds. Post Mortem

Grandiloquent Dictionary This is the result of an ongoing project to collect and distribute the most obscure and rare words in the English language. It also contains a few words which do not have equivalent words in English. At present, the dictionary contains approximately 2700 words, though it is constantly growing. Following a large number of requests, pronounciations are now being (slowly) added to the listing, although it will be a long time before they are all added. After almost three years of work, the new Third Edition of the Grandiloquent Dictionary is now available as a PDF File. Including ~500 Words Not in the Online Version! In honour of ten years of the Grandiloquent Dictionary being available online, a special edition print version has been published! The Author's Webpage You are visitor since this counter was added. Donate0 Donate0 Experimental Search The authors intend to eventually add a search box for searching this dictionary, but for the present we rely on a more general google search.

fldoe Katrina G. Figgett Director of School Libraries and Information Services 325 West Gaines Street, Suite 424 Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0400 About the Office of Library Media Services and Instructional Technology The mission of the Office of Library Media Services is to support district library media supervisors and other stakeholders; ensuring that school librarians create and maintain quality library programs that foster the love of reading and the effective use of ideas and information by both students and faculty. This mission is accomplished by building programs that: provide intellectual and physical access to materials in a variety of formats provide instruction to advance competence and stimulate interest in reading, viewing and using information and ideas involve other educators in designing learning strategies that meet the needs of individual students Instructional Support and Resources Professional Groups School Library Award Program Library Science Degrees

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