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Rutgers RIOT - Research Information Online Tutorial

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22 Great Places If You Teach Research Skills If you are a teacher-librarian or media specialist, you are the one responsible for making sure students have learned the proper research skills. Since all students need to how to do research, why are school districts still cutting jobs for our position? Once kids get to middle and high school, they need to know how to do certain things tied to research, including a bibliography, website evaluation, searching techniques and so much more. Below you will find sites to assist you in teaching research skills for all ages.Use the Teacher-Librarians tab at the top to find a megalist of stuff for you. The 6 Online Research Skills Your Students Need- from Scholastic Copyright, Fair Use and Research Skills for Elementary Students- LiveBinder

How To Make Students Better Online Researchers I recently came across an article in Wired Magazine called “ Why Kids Can’t Search “. I’m always interested in this particular topic, because it’s something I struggle with in my middle and high school classes constantly, and I know I’m not alone in my frustrations. Getting kids to really focus on what exactly they are searching for, and then be able to further distill idea into a few key specific search terms is a skill that we must teach students, and we have to do it over and over again. We never question the vital importance of teaching literacy, but we have to be mindful that there are many kinds of “literacies”. An ever more important one that ALL teachers need to be aware of is digital literacy. In the past, we spent a lot of time in schools teaching kids how to do library research, and how to use a variety reference materials like dictionaries, encyclopedias, microfiche, card catalogs, public records, anthologies, and other sources too numerous to recall. The real answer? 1. 2.

Mural.ly Five-Minute Film Festival: Teaching Digital Citizenship "Digital citizenship" is an umbrella term that covers a whole host of important issues. Broadly, it's the guidelines for responsible, appropriate behavior when one is using technology. But specifically, it can cover anything from "netiquette" to cyberbullying; technology access and the digital divide; online safety and privacy; copyright, plagiarism, and digital law, and more. In fact, some programs that teach digital citizenship have outlined no less than nine elements that intersect to inform a well-equipped digital citizen. It's an overwhelming array of skills to be taught and topics to explore. But while there is much talk about the importance of teaching digital citizenship in this information society, not many are sure what that really looks like. Video Playlist: Teaching Digital Citizenship Watch the player below to see the whole playlist, or view it on YouTube. What is Digital Citizenship? More Resources for Learning About Digital Citizenship

Curriculum: Understanding YouTube & Digital Citizenship – Google in Education Overview We have devised an interactive curriculum aimed to support teachers of secondary students (approximately ages 13-17). The curriculum helps educate students on topics like: YouTube’s policies How to report content on YouTube How to protect their privacy online How to be responsible YouTube community members How to be responsible digital citizens We hope that students and educators gain useful skills and a holistic understanding about responsible digital citizenship, not only on YouTube, but in all online activity. Lessons in English Below is a list of lessons, and the recommended flow for delivery. Or you can download the Full Teacher's Guide or the Full Set of Slides in PDF. Lessons in Additional Languages Below is a list of lessons and resources in additional languages beyond English: Learn more To learn more visit the Classroom videos page of this website, where you can find links to information on:

Ten Terrific Mind Mapping and Brainstorming Tools Today, I am running a workshop about using mind mapping and brainstorming tools to help students meet some of the Common Core standards in English Language Arts. Below are some of the tools that we will be using today. On a related note, if you're interested in having me come to your school or facilitate a virtual workshop, please click here for more information. Popplet is a great service that combines the best of online sticky note services like Wallwisher with collaborative mind mapping functions. Text 2 Mind Map offers a great way to turn your typed outlines into mind maps. Realtime Board is a new online tool for hosting online, collaborative brainstorming sessions. Inkflow is an iPad app for visual thinkers who like to sketch to process what they're hearing, seeing, and learning. iBrainstorm is a free brainstorming application for the iPad and the iPhone. SyncSpace is a collaborative whiteboard app available for iPad here and for Android here.

Oak Harbor, Washington INFORMATION SKILLS This document was developed as part of a consulting assignment with the library media staff of the Oak Harbor (WA) Schools, who wished to create a rating scale which would help them assess how well students are performing on the tasks associated with the Research Cycle . The document is copyrighted by the Oak Harbor Schools and by Jamie McKenzie, but copies may be made by schools for distribution to staff. Any other duplication or transmittal in any form is prohibited unless permission is granted expressly. 1. QUESTIONING A researcher recognizes decisions, issues and problems when looking at a topic. 5 - Discovers independently an issue or problem which needs a decision or solution after exploring a topic 3 - Formulates questions about topics with adult help to elevate the question to focus on issues and problems 1 - Relies upon adults to state questions and topics 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. From Now On Index Page

How To Get Rid Of Facebook Notifications & Other Annoying Things You Don’t Want To See [Weekly Facebook Tips] It’s funny how sometimes you can use an online service all the time, getting annoyed at little things without realising there’s an easy way to do something about it. Several of my friends who use Facebook almost every day recently told me how they hate always getting Facebook notifications for dumb games people want them to play, or updates about these games in their home feed. Obviously, if these people can be avid Facebook users without knowing there’s a fix, then there’s bound to be a few more of you out there too. As I can’t even begin to imagine the horrors of using Facebook with all those annoyances in my face, I feel I should go back to basics here and make sure everyone knows how to get rid of them. If the post doesn’t apply to you, you no doubt know a friend or two who might be able to make use of the knowledge. Getting Rid Of Unwanted Notifications To be more specific about which notifications you want to get, look at each of the sections below that in more detail.

10 Great Tools for Academic Research You Should Know about 1- Zotero Zotero is the only research tool that automatically senses content, allowing you to add it to your personal library with a single click. Whether you're searching for a preprint on arXiv.org, a journal article from JSTOR, a news story from the New York Times, or a book from your university library catalog, Zotero has you covered with support for thousands of sites. 2- Endnote EndNote gives you the tools you need for searching, organizing and sharing your research. 3- Mendeley Mendeley is a free reference manager and academic social network that can help you organize your research, collaborate with others online, and discover the latest research. This is a great productivity app that helps you :Coordinate and complete tasks with your teams. 5- Scrivener Scrivener is a powerful content-generation tool for writers designed for composing and structuring long and difficult documents. 6- Camscanner 8- Google drive Google Drive provides a powerful productivity suite useful for teachers.

Information Literacy - Home What is Information Literacy? Information Literacy is the ability to identify what information is needed, understand how the information is organized, identify the best sources of information for a given need, locate those sources, evaluate the sources critically, and share that information. It is the knowledge of commonly used research techniques. Information literacy is critically important because we are surrounded by a growing ocean of information in all formats. Not all information is created equal: some is authoritative, current, reliable, but some is biased, out of date, misleading, false. The amount of information available is going to keep increasing. Information literacy skills are used for academic purposes, such as research papers and group presentations.

Rockwell Schrock's Boolean Machine Move your cursor over the Boolean operators to the left to see how each one works. When using AND, you only receive pages including both of your search terms, though not necessarily next to one another. When using OR, you receive pages containing either one or both of your search terms. The NOT operator is used to find pages including only the first term and excluding the second term.

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