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Rutgers RIOT - Research Information Online Tutorial

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22 Great Places If You Teach Research Skills If you are a teacher-librarian or media specialist, you are the one responsible for making sure students have learned the proper research skills. Since all students need to how to do research, why are school districts still cutting jobs for our position? Once kids get to middle and high school, they need to know how to do certain things tied to research, including a bibliography, website evaluation, searching techniques and so much more. Below you will find sites to assist you in teaching research skills for all ages.Use the Teacher-Librarians tab at the top to find a megalist of stuff for you. The 6 Online Research Skills Your Students Need- from Scholastic Copyright, Fair Use and Research Skills for Elementary Students- LiveBinder

ImageCodr.org How To Make Students Better Online Researchers I recently came across an article in Wired Magazine called “ Why Kids Can’t Search “. I’m always interested in this particular topic, because it’s something I struggle with in my middle and high school classes constantly, and I know I’m not alone in my frustrations. Getting kids to really focus on what exactly they are searching for, and then be able to further distill idea into a few key specific search terms is a skill that we must teach students, and we have to do it over and over again. We never question the vital importance of teaching literacy, but we have to be mindful that there are many kinds of “literacies”. An ever more important one that ALL teachers need to be aware of is digital literacy. In the past, we spent a lot of time in schools teaching kids how to do library research, and how to use a variety reference materials like dictionaries, encyclopedias, microfiche, card catalogs, public records, anthologies, and other sources too numerous to recall. The real answer? 1. 2.

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: Great Subject Area Web Tools for Teachers As you might have noticed, Educational Technology and Mobile Learning has just applied a new template that is much more user friendly than the one we have been using for almost a year. We hope that you like it. We have also been sifting through all our archive for this year ( more than 1100 articles ) and looking for the best and most popular content to feature in separate posts as we did with the Top of Web Tools for Teachers and The Best ofTED for Teachers. Our purpose is to give you instant and easy access to materials that you might have read before but did not bookmark for later reference and so ended up losing its track. In today's post, we have selected for you the top web tools and resources organized according to different subject/content areas.

Internet Librarian: Sensible Library Website Development Sensible Library Website Development Amanda Etches Why do we have library websites? Teaching, posting things, a way to access resources and services, allowing access to the catalog and online resources, to help, etc. Scope Scope refers to the parameters of a project. Content The kind of reading that happens online is functional reading. Navigation Redesigning navigation is not an easy process. Testing Lack of information is at the root of all bad design decisions.

Mural.ly Elements of a Story Home | Catalog | About Us | Search | Contact Us | Site Map | © Annenberg Foundation 2016. All rights reserved. Five-Minute Film Festival: Teaching Digital Citizenship "Digital citizenship" is an umbrella term that covers a whole host of important issues. Broadly, it's the guidelines for responsible, appropriate behavior when one is using technology. But specifically, it can cover anything from "netiquette" to cyberbullying; technology access and the digital divide; online safety and privacy; copyright, plagiarism, and digital law, and more. In fact, some programs that teach digital citizenship have outlined no less than nine elements that intersect to inform a well-equipped digital citizen. It's an overwhelming array of skills to be taught and topics to explore. But while there is much talk about the importance of teaching digital citizenship in this information society, not many are sure what that really looks like. Video Playlist: Teaching Digital Citizenship Watch the player below to see the whole playlist, or view it on YouTube. What is Digital Citizenship? More Resources for Learning About Digital Citizenship

Technology Integration Matrix | Arizona K12 Center What is the Arizona Technology Integration Matrix? The Technology Integration Matrix (TIM) illustrates how teachers can use technology to enhance learning for K-12 students. The TIM incorporates five interdependent characteristics of meaningful learning environments: active, collaborative, constructive, authentic, and goal directed (Jonassen, Howland, Moore, & Marra, 2003). The TIM associates five levels of technology integration (i.e., entry, adoption, adaptation, infusion, and transformation) with each of the five characteristics of meaningful learning environments. Together, the five levels of technology integration and the five characteristics of meaningful learning environments create a matrix of 25 cells. What is in each cell? Within each cell of the Matrix one will find two lessons plans with a short video of the lesson. Download PDF of the Technology Integration Matrix Print this page Characteristics fo the Learning Environment ← → Levels of Technology Integration Into the Curriculum

What is Plagiarism? — Plagiarism.org Many people think of plagiarism as copying another's work or borrowing someone else's original ideas. But terms like "copying" and "borrowing" can disguise the seriousness of the offense: According to the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary, to "plagiarize" means to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's ownto use (another's production) without crediting the sourceto commit literary theftto present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source In other words, plagiarism is an act of fraud. It involves both stealing someone else's work and lying about it afterward. But can words and ideas really be stolen? According to U.S. law, the answer is yes. All of the following are considered plagiarism: Most cases of plagiarism can be avoided, however, by citing sources.

Curriculum: Understanding YouTube & Digital Citizenship – Google in Education Overview We have devised an interactive curriculum aimed to support teachers of secondary students (approximately ages 13-17). The curriculum helps educate students on topics like: YouTube’s policies How to report content on YouTube How to protect their privacy online How to be responsible YouTube community members How to be responsible digital citizens We hope that students and educators gain useful skills and a holistic understanding about responsible digital citizenship, not only on YouTube, but in all online activity. Lessons in English Below is a list of lessons, and the recommended flow for delivery. Or you can download the Full Teacher's Guide or the Full Set of Slides in PDF. Lessons in Additional Languages Below is a list of lessons and resources in additional languages beyond English: Learn more To learn more visit the Classroom videos page of this website, where you can find links to information on:

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