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Banned Books

Banned Books
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10 great science fiction novels that have been banned @djscruffy: And that's why you're a heathen and should be burned at the stake. @djscruffy: In defense of public schools, I would suggest that the reason many of these books are challenged so often is that they're frequently included in school curriculums and libraries. I grew up in a state that, according to these links, engaged in book-burning less than a decade before my birth. That makes me shudder. But I'm also the child of a public school teacher and am familiar with my mother's and many of her peers' views on children's reading materials. Despite the generally conservative views in my community, my elementary school encouraged me to read A Wrinkle in Time and The Giver and Are You There God, It's Me, Margaret. I suppose I've wandered a bit. @djscruffy: To be fair, it's not usually the schools that want to ban the books, but the few overprotective parents who make wild assumptions about the books we try to teach.

Grimm's Fairy Tales This book contains 209 tales collected by the brothers Grimm. The exact print source is unknown. The etext appears to be based on the translation by Margaret Hunt called Grimm's Household Tales, but it is not identical to her edition. The etext received by the Universal Library did not include story titles. Note that these tales are presented more or less as the Grimms collected and edited them (and as Hunt saw fit to translate them). NEW: There is now a more accurate version of the Hunt translation posted by William Barker. Streams of Consciousness - Top 10 List - Top Ten List - Top 10 Greatest LSD Quotes - Top 10 List - Drug Quotes - Jerry Garcia Quotes - Terence McKenna Quotes - Steven Wright Quotes - Jim Morrison Quotes - Ken Kesey Quotes - Tom Wolfe Quotes - Timothy Lear Top 10 Greatest LSD Quotes “Nobody stopped thinking about those psychedelic experiences. Once you’ve been to some of those places, you think, ‘How can I get back there again but make it a little easier on myself?’” "LSD burst over the dreary domain of the constipated bourgeoisie like the angelic herald of a new psychedelic millennium. "If God dropped acid, would He see people?" "Always that same LSD story, you've all seen it. "In the beginning we were creating our music, ourselves, every night . . . starting with a few outlines, maybe a few words for a song. "I believe that with the advent of acid, we discovered a new way to think, and it has to do with piecing together new thoughts in your mind. “The Pranksters had what looked like about a million doses of the Angels’ favorite drug—beer—and LSD for all who wanted to try it. "'Turn on' meant go within to activate your neural and genetic equipment. “That was the fatal flaw in Tim Leary’s trip. © 2014 Shelf-Life Productions LLC

50 Most Influential Books of the Last 50 (or so) Years In compiling the books on this list, the editors at SuperScholar have tried to provide a window into the culture of the last 50 years. Ideally, if you read every book on this list, you will know how we got to where we are today. Not all the books on this list are “great.” The books we chose required some hard choices. We also tried to keep a balance between books that everyone buys and hardly anyone reads versus books that, though not widely bought and read, are deeply transformative. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 45.

10 Novels That Will Scare The Hell Out Of You | Julie Buntin As a kid I was obsessed with an abandoned house in the cow pasture across the street from my friend Anna's house. We never went inside, but just walking by was enough to freak me out. tThe roof caved in on the stone walls, every window was a punched-out eye, and I knew that if there was a murderer lurking around the woods at night, the murderer lived in that house. The rumors didn't help either. "The Haunting of Hill House" by Shirley Jackson The greatest haunted house novel ever written. Still have doubts? "Rustication" by Charles Palliser When opium-addled Richard Shenstone, the 17-year old narrator of Charles Palliser's Gothic melodrama, grabs your hand and leads you into his twisted world of sexual obsession, murder, and sadistic letters (which may or may not be Richard's doing), you won't want to let go. "The Shining" by Stephen King The Overlook isn't a house, but it's more thoroughly haunted than any place in the fictional universe. "The Little Stranger" by Sarah Water

BIBLIOTECA SOLIDARIA Bram Stoker Abraham "Bram" Stoker (8 November 1847 – 20 April 1912) was an Irish novelist and short story writer, best known today for his 1897 Gothic novel Dracula. During his lifetime, he was better known as personal assistant of actor Henry Irving and business manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London, which Irving owned. Early life[edit] Stoker was born on 8 November 1847 at 15 Marino Crescent, Clontarf, on the northside of Dublin, Ireland.[1] His parents were Abraham Stoker (1799–1876), from Dublin, and Charlotte Mathilda Blake Thornley (1818–1901), who was raised in County Sligo.[2] Stoker was the third of seven children, the eldest of whom was Sir Thornley Stoker, 1st Bt.[3] Abraham and Charlotte were members of the Church of Ireland Parish of Clontarf and attended the parish church with their children, who were baptised there. Stoker was bedridden with an unknown illness until he started school at the age of seven, when he made a complete recovery. Early career[edit] Lyceum Theatre[edit]

Handy Latin Phrases

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