background preloader

8 Things to Look For in Today’s Classroom

8 Things to Look For in Today’s Classroom
As I think that leaders should be able to describe what they are looking for in schools I have thought of eight things that I really want to see in today’s classroom. I really believe that classrooms need to be learner focused. This is not simply that students are creating but that they are also having opportunities to follow their interests and explore passions.1 The teacher should embody learning as well. Will Richardson recently wrote this in a comment on one of my recent posts on what teachers need to be like in our current day and the focus that needs to be on learning: …we need teachers who are masters at developing kids as learners who are adept at sense making around their own goals. Teachers who are focused on helping students develop the dispositions and literacies required to succeed regardless of subject or content or curriculumThis moment is all about learners having an amazing new freedom to learn, not teachers having an amazing new freedom to teach. 1. What I have missed?

http://georgecouros.ca/blog/archives/3586

Related:  Inglés

Pearson Prentice Hall: eTeach: Strategies for Improving Reading Comprehension by Patricia Babbitt Introduction Most Effective Strategies Practical Applications of Reading Strategies Summary Resources Remember the adventures that lived and breathed between the pages of a really good book when, as a young reader, you slipped away undiscovered into your own magical world? My favorite works were Charlotte's Web, Arabian Nights, Huckleberry Finn, Arthurian Legends, and, later, the timeless tragedy of William Shakespeare's Hamlet.

Dan Pink: How Teachers Can Sell Love of Learning to Students By Jennie Rose In his new book To Sell is Human, author Daniel Pink reports that education is one of the fastest growing job categories in the country. And with this growth comes the opportunity to change the way educators envision their roles and their classrooms. Christchurch Connected Educators: Choose to be More at Clarkville What’s it taken to CHOOSE TO BE MORE at Clarkville? From Pene Abbie, Principal, Clarkville School We are a small, semi-rural school on the outskirts of Christchurch, people used to say they wanted to send their children to our place because of this – being small and rural! It seemed that these two traits immediately determined a culture of great learning. Those of us on the inside knew it took more than this and we have spent the last seven years “reshaping our learning culture.” So what does this mean – and why, if our learners are doing pretty well, would we want to do anything differently?

Teaching and Assessment practices foster learning « Ksaenger's Blog Recent research in Education tells us that pupils learn best when they know: what they must achieve in their work, what they should add if they are able to, and what they could do to enhance their performance. In lessons this means that teachers give pupils more information about what they are going to learn, more strategies to actively engage them, more opportunities for reflection and more ways to demonstrate learning. Using criteria is one way to create conditions to maintain rigor, and provoke feedback and self-assessment. Criteria helps pupils answer the questions: How will I know whether I’ve achieved the learning target?How will I know whether I’ve met the expectations for a learning activity or project? 21st Century Learning is Not A Program by William Washington, Ed.D. Scholar, Walden University Perhaps the biggest misconception that one can have about 21st century learning is to think of it as a single reform program. 21st century learning is not a singular “thing” that can be plugged into an existing school environment and used as an easy upgrade to improve existing practice. Learning that teaches children how to think is a process with deep philosophical underpinnings and embraces new findings about how people teach, learn, and get motivated. This challenges educational organizations to incorporate new thinking into the ways in which we view the function and purpose of formal education; it implores us to move beyond draconian practices that are rooted in 19th century assumptions about learning.

Study Skills Guide: Improve Reading Comprehension Skills Good reading comprehension comes only with practice. The basic aspects of reading, such as word recognition, phonetics and fluence, can be mastered in just a few years. However, throughout this process reading comprehension must be emphasized. Students may be able to eloquently repeat the words that the see on a page all day, but without reading comprehension skills, they're unable to fully understand the content, predict what will happen next, recognize characters, gain insight or understanding to build upon, or relate what they're reading to their own life's experience. Sadly, classrooms across the United States have students who struggle with reading comprehension. Manager or Leader: Which Are You? There has always been an on-going debate on the differences between a leader and a manager. Many have asserted that leaders have followers, while managers have subordinates. Reading numerous articles on management and leadership styles had revealed to me several core differences between the two which would have probably resulted in such a portrayal.

Small Change, Big Impact - Design Thinking in Action, Phase 1 - Matt Ives Matt Ives This is a write up of an experiment in Design Thinking I recently went through. The task was to make a small change to my learning environment with the aim of positively impacting learning. To jump to the end for a little bit, this process I’ve gone through has been a transformative one. It’s dawned on me, sitting here reflecting after it all, that even the smallest changes can have massive impacts. All it takes is an open mind, a juicy problem, and an eye to action. The Web’s New Monopolists - Justin Fox Just because Facebook and Google are innovative now doesn’t mean they won’t strangle growth and harm us all—if we let them. Christoph Neimann Ask Jack Dorsey, the co-founder of the social network Twitter and the mobile-payment start-up Square, what his two companies have in common, and he has a quick answer: “They’re both utilities.”

10 steps technology directors can take to stay relevant SmartBlogs The role of the typical school district technology director has become obsolete. Speak with your average teacher in many school districts in the U.S., and you’ll find the technology department is better known for getting in the way than for serving the educational needs of both staff and students. Many technology departments, led by obsolete tech directors, are inadvertently inhibiting learning. The mantra of “lock it and block it” no longer works in a 21st century digital learning environment.

Why Your Students Don't Remember What You Teach - Why Your Students Don’t Remember What You Teach: The Overwhelming Power Of ‘Place’ In Learning by Terry Heick A decent question: Why don’t your students remember what you’ve taught? A better question: Why don’t they understand what you’ve taught? A better question still: Why don’t students understand and use what they’ve been taught to create a better world? Elizabeth English: Why So Many Schools Remain Penitentiaries of Boredom "It's harder to change a school than it is to move a graveyard." Or, as it's also been said, "It's harder to change a history course than it is to change history." I think we can all agree that our schools should be among our most dynamic and innovative institutions; but despite the endless talk about school reform, they remain among our most ossified.

Related: