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Label Placement in Forms

Label Placement in Forms
By Matteo Penzo Published: July 12, 2006 “We were able to subject Luke’s theories to usability testing and enrich them through the power of numeric data.” In using eyetracking to evaluate the usability of search forms for my previous article for UXmatters, “Evaluating the Usability of Search Forms Using Eyetracking: A Practical Approach,” we discovered much interesting data. I’ll provide an in-depth analysis of that data here. Please note that our ad-hoc test setup didn’t resemble real-world conditions. We based our test setup on Luke Wroblewski’s article “Web Application Form Design.” Luke provided valuable insights and feedback during both our test preparation and results analysis. During the process of building the forms that we would test, we tried to respect Luke’s suggestions regarding the relationship between label placement and formatting and the type of form content—well-known data versus unfamiliar data that requires thought. Test 1: Left-Aligned Labels to the Left of Input Fields

http://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2006/07/label-placement-in-forms.php

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