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Institute For The Future

Institute For The Future

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Humans will be extinct in 100 years says eminent scientist (PhysOrg.com) -- Eminent Australian scientist Professor Frank Fenner, who helped to wipe out smallpox, predicts humans will probably be extinct within 100 years, because of overpopulation, environmental destruction and climate change. Fenner, who is emeritus professor of microbiology at the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra, said homo sapiens will not be able to survive the population explosion and “unbridled consumption,” and will become extinct, perhaps within a century, along with many other species. United Nations official figures from last year estimate the human population is 6.8 billion, and is predicted to pass seven billion next year. Fenner told The Australian he tries not to express his pessimism because people are trying to do something, but keep putting it off. Fenner said that climate change is only at its beginning, but is likely to be the cause of our extinction.

The World in 2030: Four scenarios for long-term planning and strategy By Ross Dawson Recently I did the opening keynote to the top executive team of a major organization at their strategy offsite. It’s not appropriate to share the full presentation, however I can share the rough scenarios I presented for the world to 2030. The scenarios were presented after having examined the driving forces and critical uncertainties for the company. Superstruct Wiki About Superstruct Edit Superstruct FAQ Edit The 36 best tools for data visualization It's often said that data is the new world currency, and the web is the exchange bureau through which it's traded. As consumers, we're positively swimming in data; it's everywhere from labels on food packaging design to World Health Organisation reports. As a result, for the designer it's becoming increasingly difficult to present data in a way that stands out from the mass of competing data streams. One of the best ways to get your message across is to use a visualization to quickly draw attention to the key messages, and by presenting data visually it's also possible to uncover surprising patterns and observations that wouldn't be apparent from looking at stats alone. And nowadays, there's plenty of free graphic design software to help you do just that. As author, data journalist and information designer David McCandless said in his TED talk: "By visualizing information, we turn it into a landscape that you can explore with your eyes, a sort of information map.

Program Description New technologies have profoundly changed contemporary culture and inevitably altered the role of the arts in society. The Digital Arts and New Media MFA Program serves as a center for the development and study of digital media and the cultures that they have helped create. Faculty and students are drawn from a variety of backgrounds, such as the arts, computer engineering, humanities, the sciences, and social sciences, to pursue interdisciplinary artistic and scholarly research and production in the context of a broad examination of digital arts and cultures. THE FUTURIST Magazine Releases Its Top 10 Forecasts for 2013 and Beyond Each year since 1985, the editors of THE FUTURIST have selected the most thought-provoking ideas and forecasts appearing in the magazine to go into our annual Outlook report. Over the years, Outlook has spotlighted the emergence of such epochal developments as the Internet, virtual reality, the 2008 financial crisis and the end of the Cold War. But these forecasts are meant as conversation starters, not absolute predictions about the future. We hope that this report--covering developments in business and economics, demography, energy, the environment, health and medicine, resources, society and values, and technology--inspires you to tackle the challenges, and seize the opportunities, of the coming decade.

Vaclav Smil Vaclav Smil is a Czech-Canadian scientist and policy analyst.[1] He is Distinguished Professor Emeritus[2] in the Faculty of Environment at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada. His interdisciplinary research interests encompass a broad area of energy, environmental, food, population, economic, historical and public policy studies, and he had also applied these approaches to energy, food and environmental affairs of China. Background[edit] He was born during WWII in Plzeň, at that time in the German Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia (present-day Czech Republic).

Jane McGonigal Institute For The Future IFTF Research AffiliateChief Creative Officer, SuperBetter Labs Jane McGonigal is a world-renowned designer of alternate reality games—or, games that are designed to improve real lives and solve real problems. She believes game designers are on a humanitarian mission—and her #1 goal in life is to see a game developer win a Nobel Peace Prize. She is the New York Times bestselling author of Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World (Penguin Press, 2011), and currently serves as Creative Director for Social Chocolate, where she is making games powered by the science of positive emotion and social connection.

57 maps that will challenge what you thought you knew about the world THERE’S SO MUCH MORE to the world than we can usually glean from a map of a place. Sure, you’ve got the political and topographical maps we’re all familiar with, and from those we can see the boundaries we’ve created and those that were naturally imposed…but what about burning questions like, “How does my country rate on the global attractiveness scale,” or “Where are all the redheads of the world hiding?” Thanks to the wealth of data floating around for free use on the internet, with these maps we visual learners can finally get a better sense of the global scheme of things, and perhaps find answers to several questions we never even thought of asking.

Biologigaragen Open source tools & assays for citizen science We are Doing-It-Together! Citizens, makers, open source communities, academics and industrial R&Ds. Futuring: The Exploration of the Future Futuring: The Exploration of the Future by Edward Cornish. WFS. 2004. 313 pages. Paperback. ISBN 0-930242-61-0. This comprehensive guide to the study of the future will give you a detailed look at the techniques futurists use, what we can know about the future and what we can't, and the role that forward-looking people can play in creating a better tomorrow.

A Skeptic Looks at Alternative Energy Infographic: Bryan Christie Design; Data Source: Vaclav Smil Two rising powers, China and India, together outweigh the United States in carbon emissions. Click on image for enlargement. It took 30 years—since the launch of small, modern wind turbines in 1980—to reach even that modest percentage. McGonigal CookieRolling For more detailed rules of this personal game, click here. To read Camus' existential in non-cookie text, here. To learn about the history of the essay, here. For the artist's bio, here. For WHY, here. Read me.

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