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A cardboard arcade made by a 9-year-old boy.

A cardboard arcade made by a 9-year-old boy.
So, this blurry photo of President Clinton with the original Caine’s Arcade funpass comes with a funny story I wanted to share. Last week, I was up in Mountainview to give a presentation at the Social Innovation Summit. The summit was amazing, with talks from worldchangers like Sal Khan, founder of the Khan Academy, and Barbara Bush, founder of the Global Health Corps. I was humbled to speak as part of Hunter Walk’s YouTube panel, and shared the story of Caine’s Arcade and the Imagination Foundation. After the presentations, a few of the summit attendees got together for a small dinner at a nice restaurant. Barbara Bush was at the dinner, and being the daughter of a former President, recognized a few of President Clinton’s security detail in the restaurant.

http://cainesarcade.com/

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for Teachers Instructables supports teachers and students by providing free Premium Memberships and awesome project ideas for your classroom. For Students A premium membership means access to all of our classes. paper architecture exhibition in paris oct 14, 2012 paper architecture exhibition in paris ‘slicetow, module 1′, 2010 by mathilde nivet image © zoe guilbert cite de l’architecture & heritage in paris, france, has organized an exhibition at le palais de chaillot, entitled ‘paper architecture’ featuring designs by ingrid siliakus, beatrice coron, stephanie beck, mathilde nivet and peter callesen. the collection of work looks at iconic buildings and the creation of imaginary cities made of the thin sheets. during the presentation children will learn the techniques used in the art of folding and etching to realize the models. paris-based designer mathilde nivet takes the context of urbanism and the city as the source for her work. she uses a pop-up technique which combines folding, decoupage and montage to represent three-dimensional architecture at a large scale.

The Benefits of Using Questions in eLearning Infographic e-Learning Infographics The Benefits of Using Questions in eLearning Infographic The benefits of using eLearning questions in a course are huge: Intelligently written questions are a great way to assess how well a learner has understood a concept.When learners interact and answer questions, elearning provides instant feedback.Your Admin/L&D/HR teams can easily track and monitor employee results.Keeps your learners engaged and gives them thought-provoking content to make them stop and think. The The Benefits of Using Questions in eLearning Infographic shows you the best ways to utilise questions in elearning, including a few of the most common types of questions available and when they are best used. This infographic covers:

The Differentiator Try Respondo! → ← Back to Byrdseed.com The Differentiator To Make A Spacecraft That Folds And Unfolds, Try Origami hide captionThe solar panels of the International Space Station (ISS) are just one example of the many kinds of fragile scientific instruments that require inventive packing and deployment tricks. The solar panels of the International Space Station (ISS) are just one example of the many kinds of fragile scientific instruments that require inventive packing and deployment tricks. Scientists and engineers at NASA are using origami techniques to help solve a fundamental dilemma facing spacecraft designers: How do you take a big object, pack it into a small container for rocket launch, and then unpack it again once it arrives in space — making sure nothing breaks in the process. Brian Trease, an engineer at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, says one way is to use something called the Miura fold, named for its inventor, Japanese astrophysicist Koryo Miura. As an example, Trease folds up a sheet of paper using the Miura fold.

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Five Keys to Rigorous Project-Based Learning Voiceover: How will today’s children function in a dangerous world? What means will they use to carve the future? Will they be equipped to find the answers to tomorrow’s problems? Teacher: When you think about traditional learning you think of a student sitting in a classroom and being talked at. Teacher: Now I imagine a lot of you are still thinking... Teacher: They are supposed to be a sponge. Man Crafts: zoetrope from coffee can A zoetrope is a classic toy which, when spun, delivers the illusion of animation. The construction is simple and the results are always fun to watch. Zoetropes work by using a cylinder with vertical slits cut along the top edge and a band of sequential drawings/photographs placed inside the cylinder. When the cylinder is spun the viewer looks at the images inside the cylinder through the vertical slots, resulting in each image blurring together in rapid succession creating the illusion of motion. With this easy to make and fun device you can make your own looping animations, regardless of your artistic abilities. The possibilities are endless!

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PBL Gallery Home | Getting Started | Modules | Resources | About Us View the work of teachers who developed and implemented PBL units/mini-units. Feel free to download and use the PBL as a template for your work with students. We appreciate your feedback. Cardboard Chassis for Cheap Robots 1: Boxbot Previously I made an Instructable on cheap motors and wheels for robots, but wheels alone don't make a robot. If you want your robot to cruise in style, it's going to need a sturdy and stylish body. It's easy to make something rough but functional, but in my experience taking the time to make something look good usually makes it work better in the long run. A clean design makes it easier to add features, swap out parts, and generally keeps you from going nuts. That's why I'm not just focusing on the design of the body, but how it looks as well.

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