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About UDL

About UDL
A short video by CAST illustrates the three principles of Universal Design for Learning. How US Federal Statute Defines UDL The Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) of 2008, passed with strong bipartisan support, established the statutory definition for universal design for learning. Read the definition UDL Series A free online collection of rich media presentations that help educators to build UDL understanding, implementa-tion skills, and leadership ability. Visit the UDL Series Resource for Parents and Teachers The UDLinks app was developed through a grant from the Maryland Department of Education to help teachers and parents search for online teaching resources aligned with UDL. UDL Now! In UDL Now!

http://www.udlcenter.org/aboutudl

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About UDL What is Universal Design for Learning? Universal Design for Learningis a set of principles for curriculum development that give all individuals equal opportunities to learn. UDL provides a blueprint for creating instructional goals, methods, materials, and assessments that work for everyone--not a single, one-size-fits-all solution but rather flexible approaches that can be customized and adjusted for individual needs. Why is UDL necessary? Individuals bring a huge variety of skills, needs, and interests to learning.

16 Things I Love About the 2016 National Education Technology Plan The DOE’s Office of Education Technology recently published the 2016 National Education Technology Plan. The plan is titled, “Future Ready Learning. Reimagining the Role of Technology in Education”. Universal Design for Learning Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is an educational framework based on research in the learning sciences, including cognitive neuroscience, that guides the development of flexible learning environments that can accommodate individual learning differences.[1] Recognizing that the way individuals learn can be unique, the UDL framework, first defined by David H. Rose, Ed.D. of the Harvard Graduate School of Education and the Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST) in the 1990s,[2] calls for creating curriculum from the outset that provides:

Universal Design for Learning Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is an educational framework based on research in the learning sciences, including cognitive neuroscience, that guides the development of flexible learning environments that can accommodate individual learning differences.[1] Recognizing that the way individuals learn can be unique, the UDL framework, first defined by the Center for Applied Special Technology(CAST) in the 1990s,[2] calls for creating curriculum from the outset that provides: Multiple means of representation to give learners various ways of acquiring information and knowledge,Multiple means of expression to provide learners alternatives for demonstrating what they know, andMultiple means of engagement to tap into learners' interests, challenge them appropriately, and motivate them to learn.[3][4]

The International Association for Distance Learning The Basics of eLearning eLearning is about getting the right information to people at the right time. It’s more than the tools. It’s about empowering people with the knowledge that they need to operate at the speed of business. UDL Guidelines: Theory & Practice Version This is an alternate version of the UDL Guidelines found in the new book UDL Theory and Practice. The principles, guidelines and research basis are the same, however the order of the principles and the guidelines have changed. Provide Multiple Means ofEngagementPurposeful, motivated learners Provide options for self-regulation+ Promote expectations and beliefs that optimize motivation+ Facilitate personal coping skills and strategies+ Develop self-assessment and reflection Provide options for sustaining effort and persistance+ Heighten salience of goals and objectives+ Vary demands and resources to optimize challenge+ Foster collaboration and community+ Increase mastery-oriented feedback Provide options for recruiting interest+ Optimize individual choice and autonomy+ Optimize relevance, value, and authenticity+ Minimize threats and distractions

Seven Principles - Universal Design - Web Accessibility for Online Learning Principle One: Equitable Use "The design is useful and marketable to people with diverse abilities." This principle recommends that the same intuitive and attractive interface be used by all students to access web content. In relation to people with disabilities, this means that students with motor disabilities that limits use of the mouse are able to access the web content solely via the keyboard; that students who are blind can effectively navigate and understand web content utilizing a screen reader; that students with low-vision can use screen magnification software and customize the styling of web content to suit their needs; and that deaf students have synchronized captions for video content and transcripts for audio. Principle Two: Flexibility In Use

The 7Cs of Learning Design Toolkit This section contains an integrated set of resources for technology-enhanced learning design across discplines. The resources have all been tried and tested by participants on the University of Leicester's Carpe Diem workshops and the Open University's OULDI (OU Learning Design Initiative) project, and are organised under the headings of seven Cs: conceptualise, capture, create, communicate, collaborate, consider and consolidate. How to use the 7Cs toolkit for designing technology-enhanced learning A brief guide to using the resources in this toolkit The 7Cs e-tivities map This document contains links to all the e-tivities in the 7Cs learning design toolkit, along with a short purpose statement for each one.

What Is Universal Design for Learning? To understand what Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is, it helps to understand what it’s not. The word “universal” may throw you off. It may sound as though UDL is about finding one way to teach all kids. tivity: 20 mins: How to ruin a course Click on the image to enlarge This activity will focus on the key issues and strategies that impact on the success (or otherwise) of learning and teaching within your context. The output of this activity will be a design checklist which you can use as one of the design evaluation tools in a mid-way design review and at the end of the workshop. 1.

UDL On Campus: About UDL (music) [Title: UDL On Campus, Gabrielle Rappolt-Schlichtmann, Co-President of CAST, appears on the screen.] GABRIELLE RAPPOLT-SCLICTHMANN: Learning is really a lifelong journey and when students come to postsecondary they're incredibly diverse. They have a wide range of strengths and weaknesses and UDL is really about how to make that learning journey tractable for as many of those learners as possible. [Students sit in a circle on a lawn on a college campus.

Session 2: What helps people to learn more effectively? : Jisc Presentation: What helps people to learn more effectively? Introduction to the pedagogical model, including a pairs activity. Presentation 21 [Powerpoint] Handout: Learning Activity Design Applying the pedagogical model to the planning and designing process, with space for individual notes and responses. What is Universal Design for Learning Universal Design for Learningis a set of principles for curriculum development that give all individuals equal opportunities to learn. UDL provides a blueprint for creating instructional goals, methods, materials, and assessments that work for everyone--not a single, one-size-fits-all solution but rather flexible approaches that can be customized and adjusted for individual needs. Why is UDL necessary? Individuals bring a huge variety of skills, needs, and interests to learning. Neuroscience reveals that these differences are as varied and unique as our DNA or fingerprints.

Learning Technology Support Learning Technology plays a key role in excellent vocational teaching and learning and digital skills are an essential part of the occupational expertise required in any workplace. Particular care has been taken to ensure these programmes are informed by the recommendations of The Further Education Learning Technology Action Group (FELTAG), our own strategic consultation on learning technology and research conducted in the sector. Our current programmes include:

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