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Squishy Circuits - How To

Squishy Circuits - How To
How To Making Conductive Dough Making Insulating Dough Building Squishy Circuits

http://courseweb.stthomas.edu/apthomas/SquishyCircuits/howTo.htm

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Circuit Stickers What are Circuit Stickers? Circuit Stickers are electronic stickers that you can use to build glowing, sensing, and interactive projects without any complicated equipment or programming skills. All you need is your imagination. Building circuits with them is fun and easy – just stick them onto a surface like you would with a normal sticker, and build up a circuit by sticking several stickers together and adding a battery. They’re an approachable way to learn and create electronics through craft, whether you’re just starting out with circuits or creating complex interactive artworks. Squishy Circuits Using a concentric design and resistive dough, cool parallel circuits are possible All the ingredients that you need to make your own conductive and resistive Play-Doh Wrap the dough in plastic film and store in ziploc bags to keep it moist longer Integrating LED lights and power source into a sculptural design Exploring complex circuitry becomes natural We use food coloring for conductive dough, and leave the resistive kind white, so you always know which one you're using

3D Printed GoPro Cannon Cam The original Cannon Cam shell was one of the first custom 3D projects I made when I started working at Make Labs. Due to the design constraints of the Thing-O-Matic 3D printer, the idea was doomed from the start, but I printed it out anyway. (It looked cool and I was excited about 3D printing.) It sat on my workbench for 3 years, until my editor noticed it during a brainstorm session for new 3D-printed projects. I told him it would probably wobble in flight and shatter on the first crash landing.

Squishy Circuits The Squishy Circuits team developed this activity so that young children (including my own daughters) would have a playful way to explore circuits. Squishy Circuits use two different types of dough as circuit-building materials—one that conducts electricity well, and one that does not. Both doughs are made with readily available ingredients such as flour and salt, and they can be prepared in a pot on the stove.

Squishy Circuits Project 2: Add Even More Lights Abstract Have you tried our first Squishy Circuits project, and now you are looking for more to do? Do you want to learn more about circuits and add even more lights? Check out this project for part 2 of our Squishy Circuit series! Objective 100 Ways to Make Maker Faire Year-Round Maker Faire is happening all around the world and all through the year. For those of us who plan our year around Maker Faire Bay Area, however, we’re two weeks into 52 weeks of Maker Faire withdrawal. For ourselves and all of you, we’ve put together a small poster with 100 ways to make it through these 365 days, and to keep on making year-round. These 100 things will keep you making until your next trip to any Maker Faire near you no matter where you live. Here’s a starter list of fun projects you can do to make every day a Maker day. Print out the PDF of “100+ Ways You Can Make It to Next Year’s Maker Faire”, and add your own ideas for fun, family-friendly projects in the comments section below!

DIY Electro Dough Penalty Shootout - Technology Will Save Us DIY Electro Dough Penalty Shootout DIY Electro Dough Penalty Shootout Make a fun interactive game with your DIY Electro Dough kit and Tin foil! Makers WNET is a proud partner of the Maker Party, an initiative hosted by Mozilla, the MacArthur Foundation, and the National Writing Project in which people around the world meet up, learn to make things, and share what they've made online. This collection is designed to support the Maker Party by providing a one-stop shop of STEM and digital making resources that focus on the problem, technology, or process behind object creation. Teachers can use the collection, which is categorized into design, how to (DIY), arts and crafts, robotics, and engineering subtopics, in conjunction with hands-on activities to further this initiative. Like the Maker Party, this collection is designed to encourage hands-on engagement in science, technology, engineering, math, and the arts.

Sylvia's Mini Maker Show By Super Awesome Sylvia and her dad, James Are you curious about experimenting with electronics, but the fear of electric shock or soldering iron burns keep you away? Why not try squishy circuits! With a special recipe of food-safe, kitchen-made, pliable dough developed at the University of St. Thomas, kids of all ages can easily use their hands to mold their very own simple circuits right before their eyes! Lets go!

PROJECTS Sew Electric Sew Electric is a book of hands-on LilyPad Arduino tutorials that bring together craft, electronics, and programming. The book walks you through the process of designing and making a series of quirky customizable projects including a sparkling bracelet, a glow in the dark bookmark, a fabric piano, and a monster that sings when you hold […] Circuit Stickers Circuit stickers are a new medium for making electronics. Squishy Circuits Project 3: Make a 3D Play Dough Sculpture Please ensure you have JavaScript enabled in your browser. If you leave JavaScript disabled, you will only access a portion of the content we are providing. <a href="/science-fair-projects/javascript_help.php">Here's how.

TRS Drawbot Once you get the hang of using TRS Drawbot, experiment with the different effects you can create by changing pens, substituting in other marking tools like pencils or crayons, working on different types of paper, adjusting the hardware, and tweaking the WAVE synthesizer parameters. Pens that "bleed" into the paper can create interesting effects at slower drawing speeds. For instance, dramatically increasing the endpoint "dwell" time in the WAVE Synthesizer code to a second or longer causes an interesting "connect-the-dots" effect with a felt-tip marker. Likewise, the amount of sliding friction under the forearm will affect line quality.

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