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Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children

Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children
Congratulations to the 2017 award winners! 2017 Winner Some Writer!: The Story of E.B. White written and illustrated by Melissa Sweet(Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Books for Young Readers) Honor Books: Animals by the Numbers: A Book of Animal Infographics by Steve Jenkins (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Books for Young Readers)The First Step: How One Girl Put Segregation on Trial written by Susan E. Recommended Books: Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science: The First Computer Programmer by Diane Stanley, illustrated by Jessie Hartland (Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers)Ada’s Violin: The Story of the Recycled Orchestra of Paraguay by Susan Hood, illustrated by Sally Wern Comport (Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers)Comics Confidential: Thirteen Graphic Novelists Talk Story, Craft, and Life Outside the Box compiled and edited by Leonard Marcus (Candlewick Press)Dive! Nomination Deadline: November 1 Award Criteria: Each nomination should meet the following literary criteria:

http://www.ncte.org/awards/orbispictus

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Picture This: Exploring Art Elements in Picture Books image credit: It’s the beginning of another school year and time to get your students familiar with the classroom library. The illustrations in those books in your library provide a great opportunity to introduce or review some basic art concepts. Collins Writing Program Introduction What Makes the Collins Writing Program Unique? "Writing is Thinking on Paper" The Collins Writing Program is designed to improve students' thinking and writing skills simultaneously. It is based on three essential principles: Thinking and writing skills develop with frequent, meaningful practice. Most students develop writing and thinking skills incrementally through a variety of informal and formal writing experiences.

An Illustrated Guide to Guy Debord’s ‘The Society of the Spectacle’ Guy Debord’s (1931–1994) best-known work, La société du spectacle (The Society of the Spectacle) (1967), is a polemical and prescient indictment of our image-saturated consumer culture. The book examines the “Spectacle,” Debord’s term for the everyday manifestation of capitalist-driven phenomena; advertising, television, film, and celebrity. Debord defines the spectacle as the “autocratic reign of the market economy.” Though the term “mass media” is often used to describe the spectacle’s form, Debord derides its neutrality.

How to Assess an Arts Integration Lesson One of the many things I hear from teachers about attempting an Arts Integration lesson is “how and why should I assess the arts piece”? This is such a valid concern because many classroom teachers have never had any formal training in an artform, nor were they ever taught the pedagogy of teaching the arts in their educational programs. This is something that needs to be provided during teacher education programs, but until that time comes, many teachers are uncomfortable “grading” an Arts Integration lesson product. First off, let’s just start with good teaching practice: If you teach it, you assess it. Otherwise, what’s the point in teaching it? So if you are teaching an Arts Integration lesson (the benefits of which are so many it’s mind boggling), then you need to assess the arts piece.

Visual investigations, visual literacy, art. inquiry based learning Laura Dortmans looks at how artworks and artefacts can be used across all areas of the curriculum to unlock new knowledge. The power of art James Rosenquist: F111 James Rosenquist’s monumental F-111, painted in 1964, portrays the U.S. 50 Incredibly Useful Links For Learning & Teaching The English Language Teaching a new language to non-native speakers may be one of the most challenging educational jobs out there, so ELL teachers can use all of the help they can get! Thankfully, many excellent resources for ELL and ESL exist online, from full-service websites to reference tools and communities, all designed to make the task of educating ELL students just a little bit easier and more effective. We’ve scoured the Internet to share 50 of the best of these resources, and we hope you’ll find lots of valuable content and tools through these incredibly useful links for ELL educators.

Watch Full Episodes Online of PBS Arts on PBS Use one of the services below to sign in to PBS: You've just tried to add this video to your Watchlist so you can watch it later. But first, we need you to sign-in to PBS using one of the services below. You’ll be able to manage videos in your Watchlist, keep track of your favorite shows, watch PBS in high definition, and much more! You've just tried to select this program as one of your favorites. The Best Music Websites For Learning English Check out my New York Times post for English Language Learners focuses on using music for language development and includes a student interactive, video, and teaching ideas. I use music a lot in my teaching of English Language Learners. I thought people might find it helpful to see which sites I believe to be the best out there to help teach English — Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced — through music. My students have certainly found them helpful. Music is a familiar, fun, and engaging tool to use in learning a second language.

In the Art Room: The Smartest Artist Well, I've tried all that. And I hate it. I can't keep up with it, I forget to give a sticker or drop a marble (I've lost too many along the way) and it just ends up being more work with less results. For me. For some of you, it may work beautifully. But you might not have that trouble with consistency like I do.

Six of the best: pieces of classical music inspired by Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet 23 April 2016 is the 400th anniversary of the death of England’s most famous playwright. We take a look at six settings of his most famous tragedy, Romeo and Juliet. Galina Ulanova and Yury Zhdanov in Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet 1.

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