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Designing Screens Using Cores and Paths

Designing Screens Using Cores and Paths
Imagine you’re on one side of a grass lawn and you want to reach the bus stop on the opposite side. Do you walk on the sidewalk around the edges or cross in the middle? Assuming the grass is dry and it’s not prohibited, you’d probably take the shortest path and walk across the lawn to the bus stop. If others have done so before, you may see a beaten path that you could follow. Such unplanned paths connect the shortest distance between two points, and we can find them everywhere in our surroundings. In urban planning they are known as “desire paths” or “desire lines.”[1] They are an indication of the gap between natural human behavior and contrived routes. Architect Christopher Alexander recognizes desire lines in his renowned book, A Pattern Language (1976)[2]. To lay out paths, first place goals at natural points of interest. In principle, Alexander’s approach is to begin with the goals—the things people ultimately want—and then link them together in the most useful way. 1. 2. 3. Summary

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Magic Ink This draft was released March 15, 2006. Please email comments to bret worrydream.com.

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