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Dwarf planet

Dwarf planet
Pluto in approximate true colour based on Hubble Space Telescope albedo data A dwarf planet is an object the size of a planet (a planetary-mass object) but that is neither a planet nor a moon or other natural satellite. More explicitly, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) defines a dwarf planet as a celestial body in direct orbit of the Sun[1] that is massive enough for its shape to be controlled by gravity, but that unlike a planet has not cleared its orbit of other objects.[2][3] However, only two of these bodies, Ceres and Pluto, have been observed in enough detail to demonstrate that they actually fit the IAU's definition. The classification of bodies in other planetary systems with the characteristics of dwarf planets has not been addressed.[17] History of the concept[edit] The IAU's final Resolution 5A preserved this three-category system for the celestial bodies orbiting the Sun. Name[edit] Characteristics[edit] *ME in Earth masses. Orbital dominance[edit] Size and mass[edit]

Dale Carnegie Dale Breckenridge Carnegie (spelled Carnagey until c. 1922) (November 24, 1888 – November 1, 1955) was an American writer and lecturer and the developer of famous courses in self-improvement, salesmanship, corporate training, public speaking, and interpersonal skills. Born into poverty on a farm in Missouri, he was the author of How to Win Friends and Influence People (1936), a massive bestseller that remains popular today. He also wrote How to Stop Worrying and Start Living (1948), Lincoln the Unknown (1932), and several other books. One of the core ideas in his books is that it is possible to change other people's behavior by changing one's behavior toward them. Biography[edit] Born in 1888 in Maryville, Missouri, Carnegie was a poor farmer's boy, the second son of James William Carnagey (b. After saving $500 (about $12700 today), Dale Carnegie quit sales in 1911 in order to pursue a lifelong dream of becoming a Chautauqua lecturer. During World War I he served in the U.S. Quotes[edit]

Andrew Carnegie Andrew Carnegie (/kɑrˈneɪɡi/ kar-NAY-gee, but commonly /ˈkɑrnɨɡi/ KAR-nə-gee or /kɑrˈnɛɡi/ kar-NEG-ee;[2] November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish American industrialist who led the enormous expansion of the American steel industry in the late 19th century. He was also one of the highest profile philanthropists of his era and had given away almost 90 percent – amounting to, in 1919, $350 million[3] (in 2014, $4.76 billion) – of his fortune to charities and foundations by the time of his death. His 1889 article proclaiming "The Gospel of Wealth" called on the rich to use their wealth to improve society, and stimulated a wave of philanthropy. Carnegie was born in Dunfermline, Scotland, and emigrated to the United States with his very poor parents in 1848. Biography Early life Railroads Carnegie age 16, with brother Thomas 1860–1865: The Civil War Defeat of the Confederacy required vast supplies of munitions, as well as railroads (and telegraph lines) to deliver the goods.

Samuel Johnson After nine years of work, Johnson's A Dictionary of the English Language was published in 1755. It had a far-reaching effect on Modern English and has been described as "one of the greatest single achievements of scholarship."[3] This work brought Johnson popularity and success. Johnson was a tall and robust man. Biography[edit] Early life and education[edit] Born on 18 September 1709 (New Style) to Michael Johnson, a bookseller, and his wife, Sarah Ford,[7] Samuel Johnson often claimed that he grew up in poverty. Johnson's health improved and he was put to wet-nurse with Joan Marklew. When he was a child in petticoats, and had learnt to read, Mrs. Boswell's Life of Samuel Johnson Johnson demonstrated signs of great intelligence as a child, and his parents, to his later disgust, would show off his "newly acquired accomplishments Entrance of Pembroke College, Oxford Johnson made friends at Pembroke and read much. Early career[edit] Elizabeth "Tetty" Porter, Johnson's wife

Yogi Berra Berra is widely regarded as one of the greatest catchers in baseball history. He was named to the Major League Baseball All-Century Team in a voting of fans in 1999. According to the win shares formula developed by sabermetrician Bill James, Berra is the greatest catcher of all time and the 52nd greatest non-pitching player in major-league history. Berra, who quit school after the eighth grade,[1] was also known for his mangled quotes, such as "It ain't over 'til it's over", while speaking to reporters. Early life[edit] He began playing baseball in local American Legion leagues, where he learned the basics of catching while playing outfield and infield positions as well. Professional career[edit] In 1942, the St. Yogi Berra in 1956. Berra was a fifteen-time All-Star, and won the league's MVP award three times, in 1951, 1954 and 1955. Playing style[edit] Managing career[edit] Berra as the New York Mets' first base coach, 1969. The following season looked like a disappointment at first.

Howard Schultz Howard D. Schultz (born July 19, 1953) is an American businessman. He is best known as the chairman and CEO[3] of Starbucks and a former owner of the Seattle SuperSonics. He was a member of the Board of Directors at Square INC.[4] Schultz co-founded Maveron, an investment group, in 1998 with Dan Levitan. In 2012, Forbes magazine ranked Schultz as the 354th richest person in the United States, with a net worth of $1.5 billion.[5] Early life and education[edit] Howard D. Career[edit] On his return, he tried to persuade the owners (including Jerry Baldwin) to offer traditional espresso beverages in addition to the whole bean coffee, leaf teas and spices they had long offered. Schultz renamed Il Giornale with the Starbucks name, and aggressively expanded its reach across the United States. Schultz authored the book Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time with Dori Jones Yang in 1997. Ownership of the Seattle SuperSonics[edit] Controversy[edit] Awards[edit]

Walter Mondale In 1976 Carter, the Democratic presidential nominee, chose Mondale as his vice presidential running mate in the forthcoming election. The Carter/Mondale ticket defeated incumbent president Gerald Ford and his Vice Presidential running mate, Bob Dole. Carter and Mondale's time in office was marred by a worsening economy, and although both were renominated by the Democratic Party, they lost the 1980 election to Republicans Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush. After the election, Mondale joined the Minnesota-based law firm of Dorsey & Whitney and the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs (1986–93), and was credited with successes in Poland and Hungary. President Bill Clinton appointed Mondale United States Ambassador to Japan in 1993; he retired in 1996. Early life[edit] Mondale was educated at Macalester College in St. Entry into politics[edit] Mondale became involved in national politics in the 1940s. U.S. Senator Walter F. Policies[edit] Committees[edit]

Big History Project Join us! The Big History Project is not a for-profit program. Your engagement will exclusively benefit teachers and students around the world. Teaching the course It's easy to teach Big History — all you have to do is register, set up a class, and go! Start a pilot Schools that want to work with us have the option of joining a small group committed to delivering Big History. Create a movement Districts and networks that want to explore how to bring Big History to life should reach out to discuss partnering with us. Teach the course All of our courseware is free, online, and available to any teacher. Not an educator? Check out our public course — a four-to-six hour tour of Big History. Questions about the Big History Project?

Alan Parsons Alan Parsons (born 20 December 1948[1]) is an English audio engineer, musician, and record producer. He was involved with the production of several significant albums, including The Beatles' Abbey Road and Let It Be, as well as Pink Floyd's The Dark Side of the Moon for which Pink Floyd credit him as an important contributor. Parsons' own group, The Alan Parsons Project, as well as his subsequent solo recordings, have also been successful commercially. Career[edit] Although an accomplished vocalist, keyboardist, bassist, guitarist and flautist, Parsons only sang infrequent and incidental parts on his albums. While his keyboard playing was very audible on the Alan Parsons Project albums, very few recordings feature his flute. In 1998, Parsons became Vice President of EMI Studios Group including the Abbey Road Studios. As well as receiving gold and platinum awards from many nations, Parsons has received ten Grammy Award nominations for engineering and production. Personal life[edit]

The Alan Parsons Project The Alan Parsons Project was a British progressive rock band, active between 1975 and 1990,[1] consisting of Eric Woolfson and Alan Parsons surrounded by a varying number of session musicians and some relatively consistent band members such as guitarist Ian Bairnson. Behind the revolving line-up and the regular sidemen, the true core of the Project was the duo of Parsons and Woolfson. Woolfson was a songwriter by profession, but also a composer and pianist. Parsons was a successful producer and accomplished engineer. Almost all songs on the band's albums are credited to "Woolfson/Parsons". History[edit] Alan Parsons met Eric Woolfson in the canteen of Abbey Road Studios in the summer of 1974. Although the studio version of Freudiana was produced by Parsons (and featured the regular Project backing musicians, making it an 'unofficial' Project album), it was primarily Woolfson's idea to turn it into a musical. The Project's sound[edit] Members[edit] Official members Notable contributors

Roman numerals Entrance to section LII (52) of the Colosseum, with numerals still visible Roman numerals, the numeric system used in ancient Rome, employs combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet to signify values. The numbers 1 to 10 can be expressed in Roman numerals as follows: The Roman numeral system is a cousin of Etruscan numerals. Reading Roman numerals[edit] Roman Numerals, as used today, are based on seven symbols:[1] Numbers are formed by combining symbols together and adding the values. Symbols are placed from left to right in order of value, starting with the largest. the numeral I can be placed before V and X to make 4 units (IV) and 9 units (IX respectively)X can be placed before L and C to make 40 (XL) and 90 (XC respectively)C can be placed before D and M to make 400 (CD) and 900 (CM) according to the same pattern[5] An example using the above rules would be 1904: this is composed of 1 (one thousand), 9 (nine hundreds), 0 (zero tens), and 4 (four units). Alternative forms[edit]

Miles Davis Miles Dewey Davis III (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) was an American jazz musician, trumpeter, bandleader, and composer. Widely considered one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century,[3] Miles Davis was, with his musical groups, at the forefront of several major developments in jazz music, including bebop, cool jazz, hard bop, modal jazz, and jazz fusion. Miles Davis was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2006.[4] Davis was noted as "one of the key figures in the history of jazz".[4] On October 7, 2008, his 1959 album Kind of Blue received its fourth platinum certification from the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), for shipments of at least four million copies in the United States.[5] On December 15, 2009, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a symbolic resolution recognizing and commemorating the album Kind of Blue on its 50th anniversary, "honoring the masterpiece and reaffirming jazz as a national treasure".[6] Life and career[edit]

White Rabbit (song) "White Rabbit" is a song from Jefferson Airplane's 1967 album Surrealistic Pillow. It was released as a single and became the band's second top ten success, peaking at #8[1] on the Billboard Hot 100. The song was ranked #478 on Rolling Stone's list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time,[2] #87 on Rate Your Music's Top Singles of All Time,[3] and appears on The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll The name White Rabbit has also been described as a nickname for counterculture era figure Owsley Stanley.[4] 1967 trade ad for the single. For Slick and others in the 1960s, drugs were a part of mind-expanding and social experimentation. While the Red Queen and the White Knight are both mentioned in the song, the references differ from Lewis Carroll's original text, wherein the White Knight does not talk backwards and it is the Queen of Hearts, not the Red Queen, who says "Off with her head!" The last lines of the song are: "Remember what the Dormouse said.

Snuggle hitch The snuggle hitch is a modification of the clove hitch, and is stronger and more secure. Owen K. Nuttall of the International Guild of Knot Tyers came up with this unique hitch, and it was first documented in the Guild's Knotting Matters magazine issue of January, 1987.[1] Generally, hitches are used to attach a line to another rope or spar, pole, etc., and are usually temporary. Thus, they should be relatively easy to untie. [2] Tying[edit] Start by tying a clove hitch around the spar or pole. 1. See also[edit] List of knots References[edit] Jump up ^ Geoffrey Budworth, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Knots (Guilford, CT: Thalimus, 2000), 100.Jump up ^ Joseph A. External links[edit] A short video illustrates tying the snuggle hitch.

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