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Outer Space, Space Shuttle & Solar System Videos

Outer Space, Space Shuttle & Solar System Videos
Related:  SPACE

iPad Survives Fall From Edge of Space in Jaw-Dropping Video | iPads in Space | Space Images & 2012 Consumer Electronics Show This story was updated at 10:13 a.m. ET. A new video has captured an Apple iPad's mindboggling fall to Earth from a balloon in the stratosphere in what may be the ultimate tablet survivor tale. The high-definition video shows the iPad falling from a height of 100,000 feet (30,480 meters), with the blackness of space and the bright curve of Earth providing a stunning backdrop. The device free-falls all the way back to Earth to make a crash landing on a rocky Nevada hillside. The video was recorded by the Rhode Island-based company G-Form, which designs protective electronics cases and athletic pads. "We are usually known for making the most protective gear on the planet," said Thom Cafaro, G-Form's vice president of innovations, in a Jan. 6 statement. G-Form officials used a weather balloon to carry the iPad up into the Earth's stratosphere, where the balloon burst and allowed its payload to begin the long fall back to the ground.

High Clouds Aloft High Clouds Aloft A Cassini spacecraft image captures a bright, oblong storm swirling high through the middle latitudes of the southern hemisphere. The image was taken through a spectral filter centered on wavelengths of light that are strongly absorbed by methane gas. Hence, any light making it through this filter to the camera's detector has bounced off clouds that are high in the atmosphere, making them visible, while light passing through the cloud-free surroundings gets absorbed by the methane gas there before it reaches the lower clouds. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Jan. 5, 2009 using a spectral filter sensitive to wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 890 nanometers. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Asteroid Flyby; Watch Asteroid 2013 ET Buzz By Earth Live Online [LIVE STREAM] Asteroid 2013 ET will pass Earth on Saturday, (Photo: NASA) Like Us on Facebook Asteroid 2013 ET is about 210 feet by 460 feet (64 meters by 140 m) in size, with some astronomers comparing its width to a football field. The asteroid flyby will bring it about 2.5 times the moon's distance from Earth. With this latest asteroid flyby coming so close to a near-miss last month of Asteroid 2012 DA 14, which was only 17,000 miles from Earth. The last time an asteroid the size of asteroid 2013 ET hit the Earth was in 1908. "Those trees acted as markers, pointing directly away from the blast's epicenter," said Yeomans. Fortunately, this weekend's asteroid flyby will put it nowhere near a collision course with Earth. © 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved.

NASA selects Canadian firms to build Mars-based online game NASA is banking on a team that includes two Canadian firms to develop an online multi-player game that could rekindle the public’s fascination with space and perhaps nurture the next generation of astronauts. Two Canadian technology companies are developing a Massively Multiplayer Online (MMO) game about space colonization for a project commissioned by National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA). Astronaut: Moon, Mars and Beyond, is the title of the NASA-commissioned MMO set in the year 2035, when mankind has begun settling space. Project Whitecard Inc., a Winnipeg-based company specializing in virtual learning technology and Wisdom Tools, a simulation and game company in Bloomington, In., were the winning team picked by NASA to develop the game. The team beat out 20 other competitors in the contest sponsored by NASA’s Learning Technologies division. Project Whitecard’s RoboMath Raising space cadets of the future Players to assume the role of astronauts at the Arthur C.

Top 10 Reasons Why the World Won't End in 2012 In the early days of computers, when hard drives weighed as much as a piece of furniture, a popular phrase was "Garbage-in, Garbage-out" (GIGO). It meant that computers would unquestioningly process the most nonsensical of input data and produce nonsensical output. "GIGO" describes the abysmal lack of intelligent thought and critical thinking on the Internet when it comes to all the hysteria about the end of the world coming on December 21, 2012, just in time to ruin Christmas. I'm getting e-mail about this weekly and I expect the nonsense to ratchet up. This latest installment in decades of flaky astronomical apocalypse predictions is loosely based on the Mayan calendar that marks the end of a 5,126-year era. Apparently the Mayans knew something about the heavens we don't, according to numerous hot-selling 2012 doomsday books on the market. The ten top 2012 doomsday scenarios: 10. So what else is new under the sun? 9. Don't hold you breath. 8. This isn't nearly as easy as tipping cows.

Lead page :: OceanLaw.org - Law of the Sea :: Security, Sovereignty & Sustainability The editorial below appeared on the Businessweek.com website on Thursday, October 6, 2011. October 05, 2011, 8:24 PM EDT By the Editors Oct. 6 (Bloomberg) -- The melting of Arctic ice as a result of global warming has set off a race to capitalize on the polar region’s suddenly accessible resources and expanding navigable waterways. Why? The area covered by Arctic ice today is about two-thirds its average size between 1979 and 2000. Plus, it is becoming increasingly feasible to ship goods out of and through the Arctic. Countries are lining up to get a piece of this potential bonanza. It is the Law of the Sea Convention that will determine who has the right to benefit from the Arctic’s riches. The U.S. continental shelf off Alaska extends more than 600 miles into the Arctic Ocean. Submitted to the Senate both by Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. This is a nonsensical claim because a state could make that argument with or without the convention. --Editors: Lisa Beyer, Max Berley

Five Future Techs for Passenger Air Travel LIVE REAL TIME SATELLITE AND SPACE SHUTTLE TRACKING AND PREDICTIONS Phys. Rev. D 87, 045024 (2013): Inhibition of the dynamical Casimir effect with Robin boundary conditions We consider a real massless scalar field in dimensions satisfying a Robin boundary condition at a nonrelativistic moving mirror. Considering vacuum as the initial field state, we compute explicitly the number of particles created per unit frequency and per unit solid angle, exhibiting in this way the angular dependence of the spectral distribution. The well-known cases of Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions may be reobtained as particular cases from our results.

Top 10 des Vaisseaux spatiaux privés de l'avenir by Mike Wall, SPACE.com Senior Writer | May 21, 2012 02:44pm ET Credit: Mark Greenberg/Virgin AmericaNASA retired its iconic space shuttle fleet in 2011, leaving the United States without a homegrown way to get its astronauts and cargo to space. But that should change soon. A new generation of American private spaceships is on the horizon, with their sights set on both orbital and suborbital space. FIRST STOP: XCOR's Lynx Space Plane Mike Wall Michael was a science writer for the Idaho National Laboratory and has been an intern at Wired.com, The Salinas Californian newspaper, and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Mike Wall on Interactive 3D model of Solar System Planets and Night Sky Visualization of the Gödel universe - Abstract - New Journal of Physics The standard model of modern cosmology, which is based on the Friedmann–Lemaître–Robertson–Walker metric, allows the definition of an absolute time. However, there exist (cosmological) models consistent with the theory of general relativity for which such a definition cannot be given since they offer the possibility for time travel. The simplest of these models is the cosmological solution discovered by Kurt Gödel, which describes a homogeneous, rotating universe. Disregarding the paradoxes that come along with the abolishment of causality in such space–times, we are interested in the purely academic question of how an observer would visually perceive the time travel of an object in Gödel's universe. For this purpose, we employ the technique of ray tracing, a standard tool in computer graphics, and visualize various scenarios to bring out the optical effects experienced by an observer located in this universe.

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