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Dark alien planet discovered by NASA

Dark alien planet discovered by NASA
An alien world blacker than coal, the darkest planet known, has been discovered in the galaxy. The world in question is a giant the size of Jupiter known as TrES-2b. NASA's Kepler spacecraft detected it lurking around the yellow sun-like star GSC 03549-02811 some 750 lightyears away in the direction of the constellation Draco. The researchers found this gas giant reflects less than 1 percent of the sunlight falling on it, making it darker than any planet or moon seen up to now. "It's just ridiculous how dark this planet is, how alien it is compared to anything we have in our solar system," study lead-author David Kipping, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, told SPACE.com. "However, it's not completely pitch black," co-author David Spiegel of Princeton University said in a statement. "It's a mystery as to what's causing it to be so dark," Kipping said. These extremely small fluctuations in light proved that TrES-2b is incredibly dark. Related on SPACE.com:

Weird World of Quantum Physics May Govern Life NEW YORK — The bizarre rules of quantum physics are often thought to be restricted to the microworld, but scientists now suspect they may play an important role in the biology of life. Evidence is growing for the involvement of quantum mechanics in a wide range of biological processes, including photosynthesis, bird migration, the sense of smell, and possibly even the origin of life. These and other mysteries were the topic of a panel lecture June 1 held here at the Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College, part of the fifth annual World Science Festival. Quantum mechanics refers to the strange set of rules that governs the behavior of subatomic particles, which can travel through walls, behave like waves and stay connected over vast distances. "Quantum mechanics is weird, that's its defining characteristic. These oddities generally don't affect everyday macroscopic objects, which are thought to be too hot and wet for delicate quantum states to withstand. Bird brains Sniffing scents Missing pieces

Akira Yoshizawa Akira Yoshizawa (吉澤 章 Yoshizawa Akira; 14 March 1911 – 14 March 2005) was a Japanese origamist, considered to be the grandmaster of origami. He is credited with raising origami from a craft to a living art. According to his own estimation made in 1989, he created more than 50,000 models, of which only a few hundred designs were presented as diagrams in his 18 books. Life[edit] Yoshizawa was born on 14 March 1911, in Kaminokawa, Japan, to the family of a dairy farmer. In 1937 he left factory work to pursue origami full-time. In 1954 his first monograph, Atarashii Origami Geijutsu (New Origami Art) was published. His first overseas exhibition was organised in 1955 by Felix Tikotin, a Dutch architect and art collector of German-Jewish origin, in the Stedelijk Museum. His second wife, Kiyo Yoshizawa, served as his manager and taught origami to the other patients until his death on his 94th birthday. Technique[edit] Wet-folding is most often used with thicker paper, however. Later years[edit]

The illustrated guide to a Ph.D. Imagine a circle that contains all of human knowledge: By the time you finish elementary school, you know a little: By the time you finish high school, you know a bit more: With a bachelor's degree, you gain a specialty: A master's degree deepens that specialty: Reading research papers takes you to the edge of human knowledge: Once you're at the boundary, you focus: You push at the boundary for a few years: Until one day, the boundary gives way: And, that dent you've made is called a Ph.D Of course, the world looks different to you now: So, don't forget the bigger picture: Keep pushing. There's a bit more below, but I also wrote a follow-up 5 years after the illustrated guide which may be of interest -- HOWTO: Get tenure. Related posts If you like these posts, then I recommend the book A PhD Is Not Enough Get it in print; fund students; save lives By request, a print version of The Illustrated Guide to a Ph.D. is on sale. Click here to preview or buy it. Why biology? License: Creative Commons Resources

The Bitterroot Footage My name is Chad. I'm a student at a university in New York. I just moved to a studio apartment and needed some furniture. I found a guy on Craigslist that wanted to desperately get rid of his things at super cheap prices so I went to check it out. He sold things in bulk to get rid of as much things as possible. An old wooden box caught my attention. The film was pretty damaged so I just kept it on my bookshelf as decoration, but I couldn't get the images of the pictures out of my head. With help from Dario, we got an old 8mm projector in good working condition on Ebay. I asked my friend to help me make this website so I can share my findings. Wooden Box and photos Open Box with film can and photos One of the photos The projector we're using with plastic reels. Footage online The Photos are online as I promised. Main Page

The Town that spent 25 Years Underwater | Messy Nessy ChicMessy Nessy Chic This is Villa Epecuen, an old tourist town south of Buenos Aires that spent a quarter of a century underwater. Established in the 1920s on the banks of a salt lake, the town was home to over 5,000 residents and a holiday destination to thousands more vacationers from the Argentinian capital. In 1985, a dam burst and buried the town in 33 feet of salt water, rendering it a modern-day Atlantis. Initially, people waited on their roofs, hoping for the water to recede. It didn’t, and within two days, the place was a devastated ghost town. In 2009, the waters began to recede and what emerged resembles an apocalyptic world. Evenly-spaced dead trees still line what used to be streets, rusty bed frames poke out from concrete rubble and sign posts point to nowhere. Amazingly, one resident remained in this desolate place. See more photography by Juan Mabromata and Flickr user F.

Splitting the Unsplittable: Physicists split an atom using quantum mechanics precision Researchers from the University of Bonn have just shown how a single atom can be split into its two halves, pulled apart and put back together again. While the word "atom" literally means "indivisible," the laws of quantum mechanics allow dividing atoms -- similarly to light rays -- and reuniting them. The researchers want to build quantum mechanics bridges by letting the atom touch adjacent atoms while it is being pulled apart so that it works like a bridge span between two pillars. The results have just been published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Dividing atoms? The atom has a split personality The fragile quantum effects can only occur at the lowest temperatures and with careful handling. The parts compare their "experiences" But you cannot see the split directly; if you shine a light on the atom to take a picture, the split will collapse immediately. Quantum systems as tools? A cog in a gearbox

How to Make Rainbow Melted Crayon Art Welcome to 52 Kitchen Adventures, your source for creative & delicious desserts! See my Recipe Index for more. Don't want to miss another recipe? Subscribe via RSS or email. We’re taking a break from our regularly scheduled programming for a crafts tutorial today. You’ve seen it on Pinterest. Supplies: you will need a canvas , hot glue gun , glue stick , a hair dryer , lots of crayons and newspaper. Of course, some colors get rejected, so you will end up with a box like this. Step 1: Pick out the colors you want to use and line them up until you run out of space. Step 2: Using a glue gun, make a line of glue across the crayons (if you want a certain part showing, like the label, be careful to put the glue on the opposite side). This is how the canvas looked after 5 and 10 minutes. Step 3: Line your floor with newspaper, place the canvas against the wall, and get your blow dryin’ on. This is after 20 and 30 minutes. I like to concentrate on one area at a time, working my way across the canvas.

Chemists merge experimentation with theory in understanding of water molecule Water is the most abundant and one of the most frequently studied substances on Earth, yet its geometry at the molecular level -- the simple two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom, and how they interact with other molecules, including other water -- has remained somewhat of a mystery to chemists. Most understanding at that level is theoretical, requiring the use of supercomputers to make innumerable calculations over periods of weeks to make educated guesses as to the arrangements and structure of water clusters before they form into liquid water or ice. But a new study, using experimentation with a highly advanced spectrometer for molecular rotational spectroscopy, has removed some of the mystery and validates some very complex theory involving the way water molecules bond. The properties of water, and how it interacts with itself and other molecules, is the basis for many processes in biology, and likely played a major role in the development of life on Earth.

Halloween Caverns Of Blood presents Halloween and Horror games Archaeologists unearth 5,000-year-old 'third-gender' caveman Archaeologists investigating a 5,000-year-old Copper Age grave in the Czech Republic believe they may have unearthed the first known remains of a gay or transvestite caveman, reports the Telegraph. The man was apparently buried as if he were a woman, an aberrant practice for an ancient culture known for its strict burial procedures. Since the grave dates to between 2900 and 2500 BC, the man would have been a member of the Corded Ware culture, a late Stone Age and Copper Age people named after the unique kind of pottery they produced. "From history and ethnology, we know that people from this period took funeral rites very seriously so it is highly unlikely that this positioning was a mistake," said lead archaeologist Kamila Remisova Vesinova. Another clue is that Corded Ware men would typically be buried alongside weapons, hammers and flint knives, as well as food and drink to prepare them for their journey to the other side.

Chinese physicists achieve quantum teleportation over 60 miles Hold onto your seats: Chinese physicists are reporting that they’ve successfully teleported photonic qubits (quantum bits) over a distance of 97 kilometers (60mi). This means that quantum data has been transmitted from one point to another, without passing through the intervening space. Now, before you get too excited, we’re still a long, long way off Willy-Wonka-Mike-Teevee-style teleportation. What’s the purpose of such pseudo-teleportation, then? For quantum encryption to work, though, we need to be able to transmit entangled photons over a long distance — and therein lies the crux: According to the researchers, their system should be able to scale up to distances that will reach orbiting satellites. Read more at Technology Review

Scorpio information - Complete sun sign description Scorpios are the most intense, profound, powerful characters in the zodiac. Even when they appear self-controlled and calm there is a seething intensity of emotional energy under the placid exterior. They are like the volcano not far under the surface of a calm sea, it may burst into eruption at any moment. But those of us who are particularly perceptive will be aware of the harnessed aggression, the immense forcefulness, magnetic intensity, and often strangely hypnotic personality under the tranquil, but watchful composure of Scorpio. In conventional social gatherings they are pleasant to be with, thoughtful in conversation, dignified, and reserved, yet affable and courteous; they sometimes possess penetrating eyes which make their shyer companions feel naked and defenseless before them. In their everyday behavior they give the appearance of being withdrawn from the center of activity, yet those who know them will recognize the watchfulness that is part of their character.

Clostridium Infections Increasing Among Children Outside Hospitals : Shots - Health Blog hide captionColonies of Clostridium difficile look awfully nice, but they're definitely something you'd be advised to keep at a safe distance. Infections with the bacterium Clostridium difficile hit record numbers in recent years. Now there's evidence the hard-to-treat infections are becoming a problem for children. The infections often strike the elderly, especially those who've been taking antibiotics that clear out competing bacteria in people's intestines. People sickened by the bug have persistent diarrhea that can, in severe cases, lead to dehydration. C. diff, as it's known, is resistant to common broad-spectrum drugs and used to lurk mainly in hospitals. Mayo Clinic researcher Sahil Khanna and his colleagues have found that children are contracting the disease at ever-higher rates, too. Although C. diff infections were first documented in the late 1970s, Khanna tells Shots, "there haven't been any studies of children in and outside the hospital."

25 Beautifully Illustrated Thought-Provoking Questions 405 Flares Facebook 137 Twitter 5 Google+ 194 StumbleUpon 1 Pin It Share 68 68 405 Flares × A question that makes you think is worth asking… At the cusp of a new day, week, month, or year, most of us take a little time to reflect on our lives by looking back over the past and ahead into the future. We ponder the successes, failures and standout events that are slowly scripting our life’s story. Remember, these questions have no right or wrong answers. Here’s a sample of 25 recent thought questions posted on the site: Few extra questions Thank you for visiting, we hope you find our site, enjoyable, informative and educational.

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