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Watch online as huge asteroid hurtles past Earth tonight A large asteroid discovered only days ago is set to sweep past the Earth on June 14, 2012. The great team at Slooh.com is going to try to catch it on camera as it goes by – so that you can watch it, too. Looking for the September 13-14 asteroid passage? Click here How many killer asteroids are out there? The asteroid will pass within about 3.35 million miles (5.4 million kilometers) of our planet, or roughly 14 times the distance between Earth and the moon. Artist's concept of an asteroid passing near Earth via the European Space Agency (ESA) You can watch the asteroid flyby on Slooh’s website, at events.slooh.com. This object was discovered only days ago and has been labeled 2012 LZ1 by astronomers. The online viewing is free to the public, starting at 5 p.m. Here's where near-Earth asteroid 2012 LZ1 will appear in the sky on the evening of June 14, 2012. Click here to expand image above Gallery: Partial and ring eclipse of May 20-21 Gallery: Venus transit June 5-6

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Brief Answers to Cosmic Questions Structure of the Universe Does the Universe have an edge, beyond which there is nothing? Are the galaxies arranged on the surface of a sphere? Why can't we see the whole universe? Does the term "universe" refer to space, or to the matter in it, or to both? Evolution of the Universe Did the Universe expand from a point? More about the Big Bang When they say "the universe is expanding," what exactly is expanding? Structure of the Universe Does the Universe have an edge, beyond which there is nothing? Are the galaxies arranged on the surface of a sphere? Why can't we see the whole universe? If you could suddenly freeze time everywhere in the universe, and magically survey all of creation, you would find galaxies extending out far beyond what we can see today. Does the term "universe" refer to space, or to the matter in it, or to both? Today, the situation is reversed. Discovering the properties of space remains one of the deepest and most important problems in modern science.

EmbedPlus - Video editing, chopping, looping, annotations, slow motion, and chapters tool for YouTube embeds and WordPress video plugins Espacio | Ciencia | elcorreo.com © EL CORREO DIGITAL, S.L., Sociedad Unipersonal. Registro Mercantil de Bizkaia, Tomo 3823, Libro 0, Folio 200, Sección 8, Hoja BI-26064, Inscripción 1ª C.I.F.: B-95050357 Domicilio social en Pintor Losada nº 7 (48004) Bilbao. Contacto. Copyright © EL CORREO DIGITAL S.L.U, BILBAO, 2008. Incluye contenidos de la empresa citada, del medio Diario El Correo, S.A.U y, en su caso, de otras empresas del grupo de la empresa o de terceros. EN CUALQUIER CASO TODOS LOS DERECHOS RESERVADOS: Queda prohibida la reproducción, distribución, puesta a disposición, comunicación pública y utilización, total o parcial, de los contenidos de esta web, en cualquier forma o modalidad, sin previa, expresa y escrita autorización, incluyendo, en particular, su mera reproducción y/o puesta a disposición como resúmenes, reseñas o revistas de prensa con fines comerciales o directa o indirectamente lucrativos, a la que se manifiesta oposición expresa.

Bad Astronomy Well now, this is an interesting discovery: astronomers have found what looks like a "super-Earth" – a planet more massive than Earth but still smaller than a gas giant – orbiting a nearby star at the right distance to have liquid water on it! Given that, it might – might – be Earthlike. This is pretty cool news. Now let me be clear: this is a planet candidate; it has not yet been confirmed. The star is called HD 40307, and it’s a bit over 40 light years away (pretty close in galactic standards, but I wouldn’t want to walk there). Massive planets tug on their star harder, so they’re easier to find this way. In this case, HD 40307 was originally observed a little while back by HARPS, and three planets were found. We don’t know how big the planet is, unfortunately. But the very interesting thing is that it orbits the star at a distance of about 90 million kilometers (55 million miles) – closer to its star than is is to the Sun… but that’s good! Image credits: ESO/M. Related Posts:

s WMAP Science Team Awarded 2012 Gruber Cosmology Prize NASA's WMAP Science Team Awarded 2012 Gruber Cosmology Prize NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, known as WMAP, transformed the science of cosmology by establishing the age, geometry, and contents of the universe to astonishing precision. On June 20, the Gruber Foundation recognized this accomplishment by awarding its 2012 Cosmology Prize to WMAP principal investigator Charles L. "It is tremendously exciting to be recognized with the Gruber Cosmology Prize," said Bennett. Image of Charles Bennett courtesy JHU WMAP was launched June 2001 to make fundamental measurements in cosmology, the study of our universe as a while. WMAP achieved this success by scrutinizing the cosmic microwave background, the oldest light in the universe, emitted when the cosmos was just 378,000 years old. The latest analysis, released in 2011, shows that the universe is 13.75 billion years old, a figure accurate to within 1 percent. “Dr. Related Links:

NASA discovers portals (but don’t book your ticket yet) Madeleine L’Engle called them tesseracts. The Syfy channel calls them wormholes. Gamers call them portals. Whatever you call them, they are fictional doorways to faraway places: another planet in the solar system … another star in the galaxy … another restaurant where the service doesn’t suck quite so bad. But today they’re perhaps a little less fictional than yesterday. At least according to a Science@NASA post: Hidden Portals in Earth’s Magnetic Field, which says they are real, sort of. University of Iowa plasma physicist Jack Scudder is studying them. Above: A view of one of NASA’s X-points Image Credit: NASA “We call them X-points or electron diffusion regions,” he says. NASA’s THEMIS spacecraft and Europe’s Cluster probes have been observing the portals, and NASA is sending a new mission, “MMS” (Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission) in 2014 to study them in more detail. However, there’s no doubt that this is a pretty cool announcement. Here’s the full video from NASA:

Your Age on Other Worlds Want to melt those years away? Travel to an outer planet! <div class="js-required"><hr> This Page requires a Javascript capable browser <hr></div> Fill in your birthdate below in the space indicated. (Note you must enter the year as a 4-digit number!) Click on the "Calculate" button. The Days (And Years) Of Our Lives Looking at the numbers above, you'll immediately notice that you are different ages on the different planets. The earth is in motion. The top-like rotation of the earth on its axis is how we define the day. The revolution of the earth around the sun is how we define the year. We all learn in grade school that the planets move at differing rates around the sun. Why the huge differences in periods? Johannes Kepler Tycho Brahe Kepler briefly worked with the great Danish observational astronomer, Tycho Brahe. Here you see a planet in a very elliptical orbit. Kepler's third law is the one that interests us the most. The Gravity Of The Situation Isaac Newton ©2000 Ron Hipschman

The Incredible Beauty of the Orion Nebula Learn about the beauty of the Orion Nebula. Photo: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center The Orion Nebula is one of the brightest in the night sky and lies south of Orion’s Belt. It is 1344 (plus or minus 20) light years away and is the closest huge star formation area to earth. Photo: NASA, ESA, M. The area in the image above is a called the Trapezium and is an area of very young stars; six of the main stars that can often be seen from earth on a clear night. Photo: NASA, ESA, M. The Orion Nebula has been seen from earth for thousands of years. Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech/STScI The Orion Nebula includes neutral clouds of gas and dust, ionized gas, associations of stars and reflection nebulae, which are clouds of dust reflecting the light of stars. Photo: Steve Black Orion is a stellar nursery where stars are born, and there are about 700 stars in various stages of birth within it. Photo: Opo Terser The Orion Nebula is an interstellar cloud like others found in the Milky Way. Photo: ESO/J. Source: 1

Mission to Mars meets reality TV The first people to colonize Mars might be reality TV show contestants. No, this is not a joke - it's a tremendously ambitious, eyebrow-raising plan devised by Dutch company Mars One. Next year, the company aims to select several teams of four astronauts each, and the public will be the final judge as to which team will get the ticket for a (one-way!) seven-month trip to the Red Planet in 2023. View all Compared to the more traditional manned missions, "Mars to stay" missions have the obvious advantage of requiring much lower costs and dealing with highly simplified logistics. Still, it's obviously pretty hard to believe in the feasibility of such an expedition, especially in such a short timeframe. "We discussed the cost figures of the components with our potential suppliers. But how can a reality show expect to raise six billion dollars? "Their departure from Earth, the journey to Mars and the first months on Mars will also attract a very large audience. The astronaut selection process

Some black holes may be older than time Stuart Gary for ABC Science Online Updated Fri 6 May 2011, 5:48pm AEST An intriguing new hypothesis suggests some black holes could have formed before the formation of our universe. The work by Professor Bernard Carr from Queen Mary University in London and Professor Alan Coley from Canada's Dalhousie University, examines a cosmology in which the universe goes through cycles of birth and death. According to their work published on the pre-press website arXiv.org, some black holes could be remnants of a previous universe that collapsed in a big crunch and was then reborn in the big bang - 13.7 billion years ago. Called primordial black holes, they would be formed in the hyper dense conditions existing in the moments after the big bang. Professor Carr and Professor Coley say if the universe expands and contracts in cycles of big bangs and big crunches, some primordial black holes may survive. Pushing the boundaries Topics: the-universe, blackholes, mathematics, physics, england, qld, canada

Tûranor PlanetSolar: World's Largest Solar Ship Set to Complete Trip Around the World The epic voyage of the Tûranor PlanetSolar – the world’s largest solar-powered boat – will soon come to a close as the ship closes in on its final stretch. The Swiss vessel is a full-bore high-tech solar harvesting machine whose deck is covered in 537 square meters of photovoltaic panels. The array produced enough energy for the boat to navigate the entire circumference of the Earth without any other means of energy. The Tûranor PlanetSolar is currently set to depart Abu Dhabi en route to their final port in Morocco – the same place the expedition launched on September 27th, 2010. The ship is ported in Abu Dhabi next to the impressive Capital Gate Tower, where treehugger’s Brian Merchant caught up with the crew during the World Future Energy Summit. The journey took the Tûranor PlanetSolar eastwardly along the equator to maximize solar exposure and to take advantage of ocean currents. + PlanetSolar Via Treehugger Images © PlanetSolar

Meteorites delivered gold to Earth 8 September 2011Last updated at 18:24 By Leila Battison Science reporter A burst of meteorite impacts around 3.9 billion years ago delivered precious metals to Earth Scientists have shown that the Earth's surface became enriched with precious metals by impacting meteorites. The Earth's crust and mantle has considerably more gold than expected from favoured models of planetary formation. A study from the University of Bristol looked at some of the oldest rocks on Earth, demonstrating that gold was delivered by meteorites long after their formation. Their results are published in Nature. While the Earth was forming, iron sank to the centre of the planet, forming the core. Any precious metals in the planetary mix would have gone with this iron and concentrated in the core, leaving the mantle devoid of elements such as gold, platinum, and osmium. But this is not what we observe. Impact theory Earth formed by a snowball-effect known as accretion 4.55 billion years ago.

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