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8 stratégies d’enseignement efficaces selon Hattie et Marzano

8 stratégies d’enseignement efficaces selon Hattie et Marzano

http://rire.ctreq.qc.ca/2016/04/strategies-hattie-marzano/

Related:  cerveau et cognitionÀ la directionMotivation evaluationméthodes pédagogiquesRessources pédagogiques

The Role of Metacognition in Learning and Achievement Excerpted from “Four-Dimensional Education: The Competencies Learners Need to Succeed,” by Charles Fadel, Bernie Trilling and Maya Bialik. The following is from the section, “Metacognition—Reflecting on Learning Goals, Strategies, and Results.” Metacognition, simply put, is the process of thinking about thinking. It is important in every aspect of school and life, since it involves self-reflection on one’s current position, future goals, potential actions and strategies, and results. At its core, it is a basic survival strategy, and has been shown to be present even in rats.

Collaborative Planning: Integrating Curriculum Across Subjects At Hood River Middle School, school leaders create time for teachers to collaborate within and across content areas on projects. This has many benefits, including: Teachers can leverage resources, ideas, and learning opportunities. Students make connections between subjects. It communicates a common message across classrooms, showing students that their teachers are aware of what they're learning in other classes. It keeps teachers on the same page in terms of not assigning too much homework on any given night or scheduling tests on the same day.

19 Big and Small Classroom Management Strategies The year I started teaching seventh- to twelfth-grade English in Minneapolis, Prince launched his song about urban ruin, "Sign o' the Times." That song was an apt musical backdrop for the lives of my students, most of whom lived in poverty and challenged me daily. That year also afforded me the opportunity to be assaulted with a stone, two chairs, a Rambo knife, a seventh-grade girl's weak jab, and dozens of creative swear words. Fortunately, classroom order improved when I learned that successful classroom management depends on conscientiously executing a few big strategies and a lot of little ones. Big Strategies: Fundamental Principles of Classroom Management

Noam Chomsky on the Dangers of Standardized Testing “The assessment itself is completely artificial. It’s not ranking teachers in accordance with their ability to help develop children who will reach their potential, explore their creative interests. Those things you’re not testing.. it’s a rank that’s mostly meaningless. And the very ranking itself is harmful. It’s turning us into individuals who devote our lives to achieving a rank. Mastering Assessment Language: Trusty Tips and Tools The formative assessment rubric is an amazing and revealing tool. They are made all the more effective by carefully considering the language we use. Mastering assessment language is an art form in itself. Like all other art forms, it takes time to perfect. Proper formative assessment tells us what students have learned.

What is Mindset Every so often a truly groundbreaking idea comes along. This is one. Mindset explains: The Critical Thinking Consortium - The Thinking Teacher "Recognize yourself in he and she who are not like you and me." - Carlos Fuentes Natural disasters. War. Political persecution. The Importance of a Healthy Teacher Ego I have two primary messages for secondary school teacher training candidates. If you don't love adolescents and don't have a healthy ego, you should seriously consider finding another profession. You'll be living with these kids for 6-8 hours every day, and if you don't love them, the days will be long and difficult. And if you don't have good ego strength (or if your ego is strong in a less-than-ideal way), you'll find it difficult to deal with a multitude of challenges. I want to focus here on the latter message.

Learning styles – important or not? This week I watched a presentation called ‘Changing the way we approach learner styles in teacher education’. This was delivered at IATEFL 2016 by Carol Lethaby and Patricia Harries. If you get a spare half an hour this week I thoroughly recommend seeing it – you can access it on the British Council/IATEFL site.Lethaby and Harries talk first talk about “neuromyths” – common misconceptions about how the brain works. They’ve focused their own research around myths related to learner styles, notably this one: ‘Individuals learn better when they receive information in their preferred learning style (e.g. visual, auditory, kinaesthetic)’ matteroffacts.wordpress.com

8 Strategies Robert Marzano & John Hattie Agree On Robert Marzano and John Hattie have both reviewed research into what teaching strategies make the biggest difference to students’ results. While they used different methods and terminology, they agreed on these 8 powerful strategies. Strategy 1: A Clear Focus for the Lesson John Hattie highlights how important it is for you (and your students) to be clear about what you want them to learn in each lesson. Metacognition: Nurturing Self-Awareness in the Classroom How do children gain a deeper understanding of how they think, feel, and act so that they can improve their learning and develop meaningful relationships? Since antiquity, philosophers have been intrigued with how human beings develop self-awareness -- the ability to examine and understand who we are relative to the world around us. Today, research not only shows that self-awareness evolves during childhood, but also that its development is linked to metacognitive processes of the brain. Making Sense of Life Experiences Most teachers know that if students reflect on how they learn, they become better learners. For example, some students may think and process information best in a quiet library, while others may focus better surrounded by familiar noise or music.

How One Teacher Changed for the Good of Her Students The excerpt below is from the book “Passionate Learners: Giving Our Classrooms Back to Our Students,” by Pernille Ripp. This excerpt is from the chapter entitled “When Change Happens to Good Teachers.” Four years ago, I realized that I needed to take responsibility for the damage I had done to students who came into my room loving (or at least liking) school and left diminished in some ways.

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