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10 Heuristics for User Interface Design: Article by Jakob Nielsen

10 Heuristics for User Interface Design: Article by Jakob Nielsen
Summary: Jakob Nielsen's 10 general principles for interaction design. They are called "heuristics" because they are broad rules of thumb and not specific usability guidelines. Visibility of system status The system should always keep users informed about what is going on, through appropriate feedback within reasonable time. Match between system and the real world The system should speak the users' language, with words, phrases and concepts familiar to the user, rather than system-oriented terms. User control and freedom Users often choose system functions by mistake and will need a clearly marked "emergency exit" to leave the unwanted state without having to go through an extended dialogue. Consistency and standards Users should not have to wonder whether different words, situations, or actions mean the same thing. Error prevention Even better than good error messages is a careful design which prevents a problem from occurring in the first place. Recognition rather than recall See Also:

https://www.nngroup.com/articles/ten-usability-heuristics/

Related:  arangkwaOutilsinterface design & user experienceDesign PrinciplesUsabilidad

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A guide to carrying out usability reviews Think that you need to be a usability expert to carry out a usability review? Well I won’t deny that it helps (spoken like a true expert!) but since user experience certainly isn’t rocket science anyone can have a good stab at carrying out a usability review and learn a great deal in the process. How Technology Hijacks People’s Minds — from a Magician and Google’s Design Ethicist — The Startup How Technology Hijacks People’s Minds — from a Magician and Google’s Design Ethicist Estimated reading time: 12 minutes. “It’s easier to fool people than to convince them that they’ve been fooled.” — Unknown. I’m an expert on how technology hijacks our psychological vulnerabilities. That’s why I spent the last three years as a Design Ethicist at Google caring about how to design things in a way that defends a billion people’s minds from getting hijacked.

Kick Ass Kickoff Meetings During project-based work, every freelancer, agency, or internal department has “the kickoff meeting.” In theory, this meeting should have all the energy, excitement, and potential of the opening salvo of the Superbowl. Project team members should be inspired coming out of that meeting, full of ideas, and a desire to begin exploring solutions. Agencies and freelancers should begin to see their clients as friends and collaborators with unique insights that can only come from frank, open discussion of the design challenge at hand.

Know When to Stop Designing, Quantitatively Interface design is more than hand waving and color preferences. When you design anything to be used by humans, there are some fundamental tools which can tell you if one interface is better than another. Quantitatively. Don’t believe me? A step by step guide to scenario mapping Scenario mapping is a really quick, easy and dare I say it even fun way to collaboratively create, discuss and communicate user scenarios. Scenario mapping will help you to think about your users, to think about their tasks and most importantly to think about the sort of user experience you want to provide. It will also help to ensure that your designs are grounded in the real world because scenario mapping forces you to consider the context in which a design is likely to be used. In this article I walk you though step by step how to go about creating scenario maps and why they’re so damn useful in the first place. What’s a scenario?

Affordance, Conventions and Design (Part 2) I was quietly lurking in the background of a CHI-Web discussion, when I lost all reason: I just couldn't take it anymore. "I put an affordance there," a participant would say, "I wonder if the object affords clicking. "Affordances this, affordances that. And no data, just opinion. 15+ eLearning Storyboard Templates Posted: 05.09.2012 | Author: Nicole L. | Filed under: eLearning, Instructional Design | Tags: eLearning, Instructional design, Storyboard, Templates |23 Comments If you have to create a storyboard for an e-learning course you’re working on, odds are you’ve come to the web to browse around and get ideas on what you want to include in it. To make that easier for you I’ve compiled a gallery of 15+ e-learning storyboard templates and samples available on the web. Hopefully going over these examples will help you narrow down what you should include in your own storyboard document. Got any tips of your own about storyboarding for e-learning? Please feel free to leave a comment!

The Anatomy of an Experience Map Experience maps have become more prominent over the past few years, largely because companies are realizing the interconnectedness of the cross-channel experience. It’s becoming increasingly useful to gain insight in order to orchestrate service touchpoints over time and space. But I still see a dearth of quality references. When someone asks me for examples, the only good one I can reference is nForm’s published nearly two years ago. However, I believe their importance exceeds their prevalence. I’m often asked what defines a good experience map. Donald Norman’s design principles for usability Donald Norman, in his book The Design of Everyday Things, introduced several basic user interface design principles and concepts that are now considered critical for understanding why some designs are more usable and learnable than others: Consistency One of the major ways that people learn is by discovering patterns. New situations become more manageable when existing pattern knowledge can be applied to understanding how things work.

Applying the Pareto Principle to the User Experience: MeasuringU Jeff Sauro • September 12, 2012 In 1906 Vilfredo Pareto, an Italian economist, observed that wealth was unequally distributed in Italy. He noted that 80% of the land and wealth was owned by 20% of the people. A similar relationship can be observed in the wealth and income across most countries. A minority of the population tends to generate the majority of the income and controls most of the wealth. For example, the top 20% of earners make 51% of all income in the US[pdf]. How filmmakers push your eyes around the screen at will About 25 minutes into the action film Iron Man 2 (2010), there is an explosive sequence in the middle of an auto race through the streets of Monaco. The scene is a technical tour de force, with explosions, cars flipping and fire everywhere, all in front of thousands of panicked race spectators. At a 2014 event at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the film’s director Jon Favreau got to see the eye movements of audience members who watched the clip. He told us he was thrilled – and relieved – to see that everyone was watching the actors Robert Downey Jr and Mickey Rourke, particularly their faces and hands, and that nobody was looking at the crowd – because the crowd was all computer-generated, and if you look closely they don’t look all that real.

Design Better And Faster With Rapid Prototyping Advertisement The old adage, “a picture speaks a thousand words” captures what user interface prototyping is all about: using visuals to describe thousands of words’ worth of design and development specifications that detail how a system should behave and look. In an iterative approach to user interface design, rapid prototyping is the process of quickly mocking up the future state of a system, be it a website or application, and validating it with a broader team of users, stakeholders, developers and designers. Doing this rapidly and iteratively generates feedback early and often in the process, improving the final design and reducing the need for changes during development. Prototypes range from rough paper sketches to interactive simulations that look and function like the final product.

Related:  interaction design