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Statistical Graphics and more » Blog Archive » Statistical Graphics vs. InfoVis

Statistical Graphics and more » Blog Archive » Statistical Graphics vs. InfoVis
The current issue of the Statistical Computing and Graphics Newsletter features two invited articles, which both look at the “graphical display of quantitative data” – one from the perspective of statistical graphics, and one from the perspective of information visualization. Robert Kosara writes from an InfoVis view: Visualization: It’s More than Pictures! Information visualization is a field that has had trouble defining its boundaries, and that consequently is often misunderstood. It doesn’t help that InfoVis, as it is also known, produces pretty pictures that people like to look at and link to or send around. But InfoVis is more than pretty pictures, and it is more than statistical graphics. The key to understanding InfoVis is to ignore the images for a moment and focus on the part that is often lost: interaction. … read on in the Newsletter. Andrew Gelman and Antony Unwin write from an statistical graphics view: Visualization, Graphics, and Statistics

http://www.theusrus.de/blog/infovis-and-statgraphics/

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Can someone please stop the infographic madness? A few years ago, we started doing info graphics by actually doing a lot of research on data and then working with a great group of guys to create art and visualization. One of them was good enough to be linked from Apple’s website. Old magazine hands called these infographics, charticles. Wired and the old Red Herring were particularly good at this stuff. (No surprise, because my former editor and goddess of the charticle, Joanna Pearlstein works(worked) for both those publications.)

Data visualisation: in defence of bad graphics Are most online data visualisations, well, just not very good? It's an issue we grapple with a lot - and some of you may have noticed a recent backlash against many of the most common data visualisations online. Poor Wordle - it gets the brunt of it. It was designed as an academic exercise that has turned into a common way of showing word frequencies (and yes, we are guilty of using it) - an online sensation. There's nothing like ubiquitousness to turn people against you. Histomap « Blog about Stats Data for infographics are particularly numerous and varied. Historical data give us very looooooooooooooong infographics. Taken from the book by Anthony Grafton and Daniel Rosenberg –> Amazon link

International Statistical Literacy Project home The International Statistical Literacy Project (ISLP) is a project initiated by the International Association for Statistical Education➶ (IASE), which is the education section of the International Statistical Institute➶ (ISI). The main objective of the ISLP is to contribute to promoting statistical literacy across the world, among young and adults, in all walks of life. To this end, we provide an online repository of international resources and news in Statistical Literacy, international activities to promote the resources and the individuals and institutions behind them, and outreach activities to increase awareness. Contact the IASE Executive➶ or the ISLP Director Reija Helenius➶ by e-mail if you have any questions. New Country Coordinator in Finland - Welcome to the ISLP team Jaana Kesti!

What Exactly Is Visualization? I love a good visualization. I’ve always been fascinated by those images that manage to inform and entertain at the same time. From time to time I’ve tried to supply tips and insight to help those interested in creating better visualizations. One morning while researching data visualizations I thought to myself “what really makes up visualization”, is it definable? So I did what most of us do when we’re in search for information; I Googled it. After a few minutes of clicking various links I came across an awesome post from Column Five Media that tries to explain what makes up good visualization that I wanted to share with you.

Paper: Privacy-Preserving Visualization The point of visualization is usually to reveal as much of the structure of a dataset as possible. But what if the data is sensitive or proprietary, and the person doing the analysis is not supposed to be able to know everything about it? In a paper to be presented next week at InfoVis, my Ph.D. student Aritra Dasgupta and I describe the issues involved in privacy-preserving visualization, and propose a variation of parallel coordinates that controls the amount of information shown to the user. Naive Approaches

Statistical Visualization For his book The Visual Miscellaneum, David McCandless, along with Lee Byron, had a look at breakups on Facebook, according to status updates. They looked for the phrase "we broke up because" in status updates, and then graphed the frequencies over time. Why they couldn't just look at updates to relationship status, I'm not sure. Notice the peak leading up to the holiday season and spring cleaning. Then there's the people who think it's a funny April Fool's joke to say the broke up with their significant other. Finally, there's the highlight of Mondays, which you might lead you to believe that people like to call it quits during the beginning of the week.

About us Role The National Audit Office (NAO) scrutinises public spending on behalf of Parliament. Our audit of central government has two main aims. By reporting the results of our audits to Parliament, we hold government departments and bodies to account for the way they use public money, thereby safeguarding the interests of taxpayers. Guest Post: The Future of Data Visualization Data is everywhere - and readily accessible The open data movement is finally beginning to have some real impact. Governments are beginning to open up and give people access to the data they have rights to. Some corporations are realizing they don’t need to keep closed doors on all of their data, especially if they are doing the right thing anyway. The number of places to find open data on the web is growing rapidly, and shows no signs of slowing. A D3 visualization of unemployment in the US from Nathan Yau, data via the BLS

An Information Visualization Exercise Want to play a game with The Dashboard Spy and Information Visualization expert Stephen Few? In his blog post, The Billion Pound-o-Gram Redesigned, he takes a stab at redesigning a pretty well known chart by David McCandless. Take a look at the original chart here: Here is how it appeared in Guardian.co.uk’s Information is Beautiful Friday: The Billion Pound-o-Gram 289 billion spent on this. 400 billion spent on that.

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