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Data Science Kit - Deals 

Data Science Kit - Deals 
Data Science Starter Kit The Tools You Need to Get Started with Data From basic statistics to complex modeling and large-scale analytics, the Data Science Starter Kit outlines a clear path to mastering data and gets you started with essential tools, key algorithms and methods, and a survey of the hottest languages and frameworks in today's ecosystem. If you're ready to plunge into the world of data, the Starter Kit provides the comprehensive introduction you're looking for. Buy any two titles and get the 3rd Free with discount code: OPC10 Or, get them all for $209.20 (60% savings) Data Science for Business: Written by renowned data science experts Foster Provost and Tom Fawcett, Data Science for Business introduces the fundamental principles of data science, and walks you through the "data-analytic thinking" necessary for extracting useful knowledge and business value from the data you collect. Ebook: $33.99 Ebook: $38.99 Video: $119.99 Video: $159.99 Related:  DataVis Tutorials - Principles

International Statistical Literacy Project home The International Statistical Literacy Project (ISLP) is a project initiated by the International Association for Statistical Education➶ (IASE), which is the education section of the International Statistical Institute➶ (ISI). The main objective of the ISLP is to contribute to promoting statistical literacy across the world, among young and adults, in all walks of life. To this end, we provide an online repository of international resources and news in Statistical Literacy, international activities to promote the resources and the individuals and institutions behind them, and outreach activities to increase awareness. Contact the IASE Executive➶ or the ISLP Director Reija Helenius➶ by e-mail if you have any questions. New Country Coordinator in Finland - Welcome to the ISLP team Jaana Kesti!

Jump Start Responsive Web Design : Jump Start Responsive Web Design By Craig Sharkie and Andrew Fisher An essential skill for every web designer and developer. No longer just a buzz phrase, Responsive Web Design is now an essential skill for every web designer and developer. In Jump Start Responsive Web Design, learn responsive techniques to make your designs look magnificent on any device, future proof them, and reduce development time and budget. RWD helps you deal with the very real problem of not knowing where and how your application will be used. With these skills you’ll effortlessly win new clients. What you’ll learn Build smart and save time with fluid layouts for different screensUse adaptive images to design for Apple’s Retina display and moreFuture-proof your work using media queries to identify screen size Who should read this book? Anyone involved in the Web, from business owners to agency designers, corporations to developers. Meet the Authors Craig Sharkie was once happy to call himself a developer, speaker, author, and advocate.

had.co.nz Bad Data Handbook  Kevin Fink offers suggestions on approaching data critically in order to ensure that we understand what we're working with before we begin to try to manipulate it. Fink offers useful scripts in shell and Perl that can be used to inspect data and perform basic sanity checks. Paul Murrell tackles the problem of scraping data from sources formatted for human consumption into a format more amenable for algorithmic analysis using R. And on and on. Each chapter addresses a critical concern in the data life-cycle: identifying, annotating, capturing, archiving, versioning, manipulating, analyzing, and deriving actionable information from imperfect or incomplete data. Given the number of authors who contributed to this volume, it should come as no surprise that the tone, writing styles, and tools used vary greatly among the chapters, sometimes wandering into technical minutia, but only infrequently.

Statistical Graphics and more » Blog Archive » Statistical Graphics vs. InfoVis The current issue of the Statistical Computing and Graphics Newsletter features two invited articles, which both look at the “graphical display of quantitative data” – one from the perspective of statistical graphics, and one from the perspective of information visualization. Robert Kosara writes from an InfoVis view: Visualization: It’s More than Pictures! Information visualization is a field that has had trouble defining its boundaries, and that consequently is often misunderstood. It doesn’t help that InfoVis, as it is also known, produces pretty pictures that people like to look at and link to or send around. The key to understanding InfoVis is to ignore the images for a moment and focus on the part that is often lost: interaction. … read on in the Newsletter. Andrew Gelman and Antony Unwin write from an statistical graphics view: Visualization, Graphics, and Statistics Quantitative graphics, like statistics itself, is a young and immature field.

Microinteractions  The book, unfortunately, doesn't fulfill this promising (minus that story) start. Rather than an intensive and systematic dissection of single-use-case interactions, we're given example after example (after example) of Triggers, then of Rules, then of Feedback, almost all drawn from postings to a single Website ("Little Big Details"),accompanied by a narrative which, by rapidly changing point of view and underlying metaphor, makes the analytical context confusing and causes all of these examples (and there are a LOT of examples) to just pile together, conceptually. There are good ideas — use smart defaults, don't start from zero, recognize "signature moments" — but they are presented in mind-numbing breadth rather than depth, with many, many examples but little analysis of why these rules might apply exactly this way in this particular context. The barrage of examples, to me, grew tiresome. You might have figured that out already. Mr.

Data visualisation: in defence of bad graphics | News Are most online data visualisations, well, just not very good? It's an issue we grapple with a lot - and some of you may have noticed a recent backlash against many of the most common data visualisations online. Poor Wordle - it gets the brunt of it. It was designed as an academic exercise that has turned into a common way of showing word frequencies (and yes, we are guilty of using it) - an online sensation. In the last week alone, New York Times senior software architect Jacob Harris has called for an end to word clouds, describing them as the "mullets of the Internet". While on Poynter, the line is that "People are tired of bad infographics, so make good ones" Awesomely bad infographics from How to Interactive Design Photograph: How To Interactive Design Grace Dobush has written a great post explaining how to produce clear graphics, but can't resist a cry for reason. What's the big deal? Oh and there has also been a call for a pogrom of online data visualisers from Gizmodo's Jesus Diaz:

Arduino Workshop  The book's 65 projects range from lighting LEDs, a kind of Arduino "Hello world" (though a "Hello world" project occurs in the chapter discussing driving LCDs), to projects incorporating cell phone technologies like SMS text messages, projects about GPS and even several dealing with the construction of a tank-like robot, my personal favorite. Many of the projects start with a simple version then build progressively more sophisticated versions by adding more components or features with the goal of teaching perhaps a specific technology, or as an exercise to encourage the reader to consider the Arduino's flexibility. For example, the tank robot project starts by using micro-switches to assist with "collision avoidance." Then the reader is guided through modifying the robot to use infrared components to avoid objects, and then to using ultrasonic distance calculation components! The book also contains a section on comparing the various Arduino boards available in the Arduino ecosystem.

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