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Stunning Bronze Age statuette with a tattooed face and a bone mask found in Siberia 'Given that the discovery is 5,000 years old, you can imagine how important it is to understand the beliefs of the ancient people populating Siberia', said Vyacheslav Molodin. Picture: Novosibirsk Institute of Archeology and Ethnography The discovery was made this summer inside the mass burial of people from Odinov culture in Vengerovsky district of Novosibirsk region, Western Siberia. The small - about a palm size - statuette found in situ by the team of Novosibirsk Institute of Archeology and Ethnography had a mask depicting a bear made of a horse vertebrae. ‘This is without a doubt the find of the season, the find that any world museum from the Hermitage to the Louvre museum would love to exhibit’, said professor Vyacheslav Molodin, head of the Ust-Tartas 2 expedition. ‘We’ve never come across anything like this, despite our extensive knowledge of the Odinov culture’s burial rites.

The Japan times Japan’s postwar pacifism will face a critical challenge this year that could drastically change the course of this country forever: the July Upper House election. Right-leaning parties, most notably the ruling Liberal Democratic Party led by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, will try to capture more than two-thirds of the 242-seat chamber in the election, and thus have the seats required to initiate a national referendum to revise the war-renouncing Constitution. But which parties currently advocate constitutional revision? And how many seats are those parties likely to win in the election? The following are questions and answers on the numbers in the election and the prospects for the political battle over the Constitution. Why is the Upper House election regarded as critical to the fate of the Constitution?

Nouvelles de l’estampe/en ligne Antoinette Friedenthal A Newly Discovered Portrait of Pierre I Mariette Pierre Leleux The family origins of engraver Thomas de Leu Véronique Meyer First permanent exhibitions at the Cabinet des Estampes of the Bibliothèque Royale/Impériale Rodolphe Leroy Discovery of a novel state of the Jean Mignon signed etching of Alexander gifting gold to the priests of Ammon Valentine Toutain-Quittelier Enjeux et conditions d’une acclimatation par la gravure The dragon motif in rocaille visual culture : prints as the vehicle for its adoption and adaptation Pascale Cugy The abandoned illustration project for Antoine Dondé's 1671 Life of saint François de Paule

Cape of Good Hope, South Africa. The Most South-Western Point of The African Continent The discovery of Cape of Good Hope — a geographic location with one of the most romantic names in the world — is due to Portuguese navigator Bartolomeu Dias. At the end of the 15th century Portugal was literally obsessed with discovering the seaway to India sending one expedition after another. In 1487 this task was entrusted to Dias. His voyage, as well as his predecessors', was filled with adventures, shooting incidents with local tribes, and threats of mutiny from his crew. Dias ended up sailing only around Africa thinking that if one continues to sail forward, he would arrive to India sooner or later.

learn french Welcome to the “Phonetique” site. It is aimed at learners of French as a foreign language, but can also be used by native French speakers. On these pages, you will be able to hear all the sounds of the French alphabet, and those of the international phonetic alphabet. WHO (secretly) changed their definition of “Herd Immunity” Kit Knightly The World Health Organization has changed the definition of “herd immunity” on the Covid section of their website, inserting the claim that it is a “concept used in vaccination”, and requires a vaccine to be achieved. Both of these statements are total falsehoods, which is demonstrated by the WHO’s own website back in June, and every dictionary definition of “herd immunity” you can find. To quote the WHO’s own original definition:

Challenging Abe’s Japan The new issue of Jacobin, centering on development and the Global South, is out now. To celebrate its release, new subscriptions start at only $14.95. Since the earthquakes and a nuclear meltdown in Fukushima hit eastern Japan in March 2011, fissures have opened up across the surface of the Japanese archipelago — and across the surface of Japanese society. MAY Preface — May καταστροφή: the End and the Beginning — Déborah Danowski Man in the Anthropocene (as portrayed by the film Gravity) — Stephanie Wakefield Politics in the Anthropocene: A Conversation between Stephanie Wakefield and Antek Walczak— May DIY or DIE: A Pastoral Selfie— Jenna Bliss, Elise Duryee-Browner, Damon Sfetsios Two Tales— Alejandra Riera The Drakensberg - Dragon Mountains, South Africa Packing for my first trip to the Republic of South Africa, I didn't bother to research all of its sights beforehand. I thought it would be enough to focus on the most famous ones, such as Kruger National Park, Cape Town, Table Mountain, the Cape of Good Hope, and, of course, Victoria Falls easily accessible by plane, even though it's located outside the Republic of South Africa on the border of Zambia and Zimbabwe. But, as it usually happens during trips, some things become clear only on the spot. Back in Cape Town airport I noticed huge posters with amazing mountain views entitled "The Drakensberg".

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