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47 Mind-Blowing Psychology-Proven Facts You Should Know About Yourself

47 Mind-Blowing Psychology-Proven Facts You Should Know About Yourself
I’ve decided to start a series called 100 Things You Should Know about People. As in: 100 things you should know if you are going to design an effective and persuasive website, web application or software application. Or maybe just 100 things that everyone should know about humans! The order that I’ll present these 100 things is going to be pretty random. So the fact that this first one is first doesn’t mean that’s it’s the most important.. just that it came to mind first. Dr. <div class="slide-intro-bottom"><a href=" class="sl-start"> &raquo;</a></div>

http://www.businessinsider.com/100-things-you-should-know-about-people-2010-11

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Meditation found to increase brain size Kris Snibbe/Harvard News Office Sara Lazar (center) talks to research assistant Michael Treadway and technologist Shruthi Chakrapami about the results of experiments showing that meditation can increase brain size. People who meditate grow bigger brains than those who don’t. Researchers at Harvard, Yale, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found the first evidence that meditation can alter the physical structure of our brains. Narcissistic Personality Inventory: Narcissism Test This is a interactive version of the Narcissistic Personality Inventory. Introduction Narcissism in personality trait generally conceived of as excessive self love. In Greek mythology Narcissus was a man who fell in love with his reflection in a pool of water. The NPI was developed by Raskin and Hall (1979) for the measurement of narcissism as a personality trait in social psychological research. It is based on the definition of narcissistic personality disorder found in the DSM-III, but is not a diagnostic tool for NPD and instead measures subclinical or normal expressions of narcissism. So, even someone who gets the highest possible score on the NPI does not necessarily have NPD.

Rosenhan experiment Rosenhan's study was done in two parts. The first part involved the use of healthy associates or "pseudopatients" (three women and five men, including Rosenhan himself) who briefly feigned auditory hallucinations in an attempt to gain admission to 12 different psychiatric hospitals in five different states in various locations in the United States. All were admitted and diagnosed with psychiatric disorders. After admission, the pseudopatients acted normally and told staff that they felt fine and had no longer experienced any additional hallucinations. All were forced to admit to having a mental illness and agree to take antipsychotic drugs as a condition of their release. The average time that the patients spent in the hospital was 19 days.

Kiss Your Keyboard and Mouse Goodbye With The Leap Since Steven Spielberg expertly crafted it a decade ago, the world has been clamoring for a user interface similar to what was found in sci-fi thriller Minority Report. Even the inkling of flipping through applications and swiping screens in mid-air made geeks tingle all over, but aside from expertly developed hacks on the Xbox Kinect, nothing definitive seemed to break through and truly give the public that enticing functionality of the future. That is, until now. Mirror stage A toddler and a mirror The mirror stage (French: stade du miroir) is a concept in the psychoanalytic theory of Jacques Lacan. The mirror stage is based on the belief that infants recognize themselves in a mirror (literal) or other symbolic contraption which induces apperception (the turning of oneself into an object that can be viewed by the child from outside of himself) from the age of about six months.

What To Do When You Don't Know What To Do - Leonard A. Schlesinger, Charles F. Kiefer, and Paul B. Brown by Leonard A. Schlesinger, Charles F. Kiefer, and Paul B. Brown | 11:21 AM March 21, 2012 Are you frustrated? Woodworth Psychoneurotic Inventory This is a interactive version of the Woodworth Psychoneurotic Inventory. Introduction "While the great World War exacted a frightful toll of death, destruction, and chaos, it yet served as a means of enriching the sum total of the world's store of knowledge. Industries worked at top speed, there was no slacking, the United States Government had little sympathy with procrastination. Men were being killed, land was being laid waste, and minds and bodies were being deteriorated under the strain. The Government called upon every available scientist to aid in the solution of its most pressing problems.

10 Practical Uses For Psychological Research in Everyday Life People love to give each other advice. The web is full to bursting with all types of pseudo-psychological advice about life. The problem is, how much of this is based on real scientific evidence? Humans Have a Lot More Than Five Senses Today I found out humans have a lot more than five senses. It turns out, there are at least nine senses and most researchers think there are more like twenty-one or so. Just for reference, the commonly held definition of a “sense” is “any system that consists of a group of sensory cell types that respond to a specific physical phenomenon and that corresponds to a particular group of regions within the brain where the signals are received and interpreted.” The commonly held human senses are as follows: Sight: This technically is two senses given the two distinct types of receptors present, one for color (cones) and one for brightness (rods).Taste: This is sometimes argued to be five senses by itself due to the differing types of taste receptors (sweet, salty, sour, bitter, and umami), but generally is just referred to as one sense. For those who don’t know, umami receptors detect the amino acid glutamate, which is a taste generally found in meat and some artificial flavoring.

8-Circuit Model of Consciousness The eight-circuit model of consciousness is a theory proposed by Timothy Leary and expanded on by Robert Anton Wilson and Antero Alli. The model describes eight circuits of information (eight "brains") that operate within the human nervous system. Each circuit is concerned with a different sphere of activity. unusual and fun! date ideas Keyboard: S - next A - previous R - random unusual and fun! date ideas Share on FB 400 Below Random Pics

Emotional intelligence Emotional intelligence (EI) can be defined as the ability to monitor one's own and other people's emotions, to discriminate between different emotions and label them appropriately, and to use emotional information to guide thinking and behavior.[1] There are three models of EI. The ability model, developed by Peter Salovey and John Mayer, focuses on the individual's ability to process emotional information and use it to navigate the social environment.[2] The trait model as developed by Konstantin Vasily Petrides, "encompasses behavioral dispositions and self perceived abilities and is measured through self report" [3] The final model, the mixed model is a combination of both ability and trait EI, focusing on EI being an array of skills and characteristics that drive leadership performance, as proposed by Daniel Goleman.[4] It has been argued that EI is either just as important as one's intelligence quotient (IQ).

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