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Why Reflect? - Reflection4Learning

Why Reflect? - Reflection4Learning
It is the language of reflection that deepens our knowledge of who we are in relation to others in a community of learners. What are the pedagogical and physiological foundations of reflection for learning? Why is reflection important for learning? What does the literature say about how reflection supports learning? Learning/Process Portfolios involve the focus on Plato’s directive, “know thyself” which can lead to a lifetime of investigation. Self-knowledge becomes an outcome of learning. The major theoretical roots of reflection can be found in John Dewey, Jürgen Habermas, David Kolb, and Donald Schön. Zull’s overlay of Kolb’s Experiential Learning Model over the structure of the brain (p.18, shown above), and Jennifer Moon’s further elaboration (shown on the right), provide further support for the importance of reflection in supporting deep learning. Roger Schank (1991) points out the importance of stories in learning, that recalling and creating stories are part of learning.

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Teaching and Learning Through Reflective Practice: A Practical Guide for ... - Tony Ghaye Now in its second edition, Teaching and Learning through Reflective Practice is a practical guide to enable all those involved in educational activities to learn through the practices of reflection. The book highlights the power that those responsible for teaching and learning have to appraise, understand and positively transform their teaching. Seeing the teacher as a reflective learner, the book emphasises a strengths-based approach in which positivity, resilience, optimism and high performance can help invigorate teaching, enhance learning and allow the teacher to reach their full potential. This approach busts the myth that reflection on problems and deficits is the only way to better performance. The approach of this new edition is an ‘appreciative’ one.

Metacognition: The Gift That Keeps Giving Editor's note: This post is co-authored by Marcus Conyers who, with Donna Wilson, is co-developer of the M.S. and Ed.S. Brain-Based Teaching degree programs at Nova Southeastern University. They have written several books, including Five Big Ideas for Effective Teaching: Connecting Mind, Brain, and Education Research to Classroom Practice. Students who succeed academically often rely on being able to think effectively and independently in order to take charge of their learning. These students have mastered fundamental but crucial skills such as keeping their workspace organized, completing tasks on schedule, making a plan for learning, monitoring their learning path, and recognizing when it might be useful to change course.

How to Stimulate Recall of Prior Learning Infographic Instructional Design Infographics Teacher Infographics Robert Gagné proposed a model of nine events which follow a systematic instructional design process. Each of the nine events of instruction is highlighted in a series of infographics.

5 Powerful Reasons to Make Reflection a Daily Habit, and How to Do It Post written by Leo Babauta. It’s New Year’s Eve (where I live), and I’ve been doing a lot of reflection over the last year. It’s the perfect time of year to look back and reflect on what you’ve done right this year, to learn from what you’ve done. And on further reflection, this habit of reflection is something that I’ve developed pretty strongly this year. University of Manchester ‘It is not sufficient simply to have an experience in order to learn. Without reflecting upon this experience it may quickly be forgotten, or its learning potential lost. It is from the feelings and thoughts emerging from this reflection that generalisations or concepts can be generated. And it is generalisations that allow new situations to be tackled effectively.’

Learning through Reflection We learn by experiences that allow us to (Wertenbroch & Nabeth, 2000): Absorb (read, hear, feel) Do (activity) Interact (socialize) In addition, we also learn by reflecting on such experiences (Dewey 1933). Reflection is thinking for an extended period by linking recent experiences to earlier ones in order to promote a more complex and interrelated mental schema. Engaging Brains: How to Enhance Learning by Teaching Kids About Neuroplasticity Editor's note: This post is co-authored by Marcus Conyers who, with Donna Wilson, is co-developer of the M.S. and Ed.S. Brain-Based Teaching degree programs at Nova Southeastern University. They have written several books, including Five Big Ideas for Effective Teaching: Connecting Mind, Brain, and Education Research to Classroom Practice. Enhancing Student Commitment

A 4-Step Recipe for Maximum eLearner Engagement We’ve all met them. Ask about online courses they’ve taken, and they’ll roll their eyes. Current eLearners are bored and can’t wait for their courses to end. Whoever put together these courses – was it you? Reflections on Leadership and Learning The Habit of Reflection I have written about the value of taking time to reflect before. In that post I shared my desire to develop a habit of reflecting. I’m back today to revisit the idea by sharing two resources that have helped me cultivate that habit. A colleague gave me the book Leading Every Day: 124 Actions for Effective Leadership by Joyce Kaser, Susan Mundry, Katherine E.

Learning Through Reflection Edited by Arthur L. Costa and Bena Kallick by Arthur L. Costa and Bena Kallick Reflection has many facets. Critical Reflection Critical reflection has been elevated to the major objective of adult education in the work of Mezirow (1990). “Perhaps even more central to adult learning than elaborating established meaning schemes is the process of reflecting back on prior learning to determine whether what we have learned is justified under present circumstances. This is a crucial learning process egregiously ignored by learning theorists.” (Mezirow, 1990:5)

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