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US State Department Creates Illustrations Depicting Differences Between British And American English

US State Department Creates Illustrations Depicting Differences Between British And American English
People in America and the UK both speak English, and while most words remain the same there are a few differences that could potentially create a misunderstanding. To help English speakers from all over the world better communicate, the US State Department created these useful illustrations that highlight key differences between British and American English. English originated as early as the mid-5th century, and has since been brought to a number of countries. Over the years many changes and adaptations have taken place, creating unique discrepancies in the English language all around the world. Here are some of the main differences between British and American English, we bet you find at least a few that truly surprise you! 1. americanenglish.state.gov 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

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