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Productivity - lifehack.org

Productivity - lifehack.org

ATPM 13.02 - Next Actions: A Survey of the GTD App Landscape The 2001 publication of David Allen’s Getting Things Done stirred a revolution of organized, productive work environments for thousands. Allen’s system, affectionately known as “GTD” to those in the know, provides a framework for managing tasks, projects, goals, and, indeed, much of one’s life. As the GTD system spread in usage and popularity, dozens of tools and writings arose as a part of the GTD sub-culture. Blogs such as 43Folders and LifeHacker devote a significant amount of attention to implementing the GTD system. Allen’s own company Web site is a haven for GTD users, complete with a members-only resource center (which you can join for a mere $40 per month). The bottom line for GTD is fairly straightforward. Software Proliferation Since 2005, a burgeoning market of software with the ostensible purpose of assisting with the GTD process has hit the Mac, and the computer world in general. For now, I would like to start off by giving a “comprehensive” introduction of GTD tools. Park

The Theory Underlying Concept Maps and How to Construct and Use Them Concept maps are graphical tools for organizing and representing knowledge. They include concepts, usually enclosed in circles or boxes of some type, and relationships between concepts indicated by a connecting line linking two concepts. Words on the line, referred to as linking words or linking phrases, specify the relationship between the two concepts. Figure 1. (click on an image for a larger view) Another characteristic of concept maps is that the concepts are represented in a hierarchical fashion with the most inclusive, most general concepts at the top of the map and the more specific, less general concepts arranged hierarchically below. Another important characteristic of concept maps is the inclusion of cross-links. A final feature that may be added to concept maps is specific examples of events or objects that help to clarify the meaning of a given concept. The question sometimes arises as to the origin of our first concepts. Figure 2. (click on image for a larger view)

Archive » Tough questions for your things I like to think of myself as a person who is unattached to physical objects. Truth be told, however, this might not necessarily be the case. My lifestyle, being more minimalist than the average Jane’s, means that I make a conscience decision to bring something into my home. Each object exists in my space for a reason, and a chunk of time, planning, and research was dedicated to its acquisition, and there are further evaluations to let it stay. I likely will never resolve this quandary, but I think that the acquisition and evaluation process that I put into every object — and I do mean every object — is a valuable one. I have two set lists of questions that I ask myself about every object in my home. Questions for New Acquisitions: Do I have something like this already that fulfills the same purpose? Questions for Items Already in My Home: Do I have something else like this that fulfills the same purpose?

All The Productivity Tips You Need In 9 Infographics Ever notice how some people come across as having their act together? They are able to get their work done on time, every time. They have the time and energy for 100 different things. Yet, they always seem non-frazzled, non-overwhelmed, and non-frantic. Do you console yourself with the thought that these are a special breed of people with a special DNA sequence? Sadly, that is far from the truth. 1. One of the most frantic and chaotic times in most people’s day is the morning. 2.Your mouth as the gateway to productivity Believe it or not, what you put in your mouth can affect your productivity. 3. Eating healthy is not enough. 4. A good night’s sleep is key to not only our well-being but to our productivity as well. 5. Clutter and disorganized workspaces are time suckers and cause frustration, leading to decreased productivity. 6. Research has proven that multi-tasking causes a 40% drop in productivity levels. 7. 8. All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy! 9. And here’s a BONUS one.

clean sweep assessment Are you ready to clean up your life? The Clean Sweep Program is a checklist of 100 items which, when completed, give one complete personal freedom. These 100 items are grouped in 4 areas of life with 25 in each group: Physical Environment, Well-being, Money and Relationships. These 4 areas are the cornerstone for a strong and healthy life and the program helps a person to clean up, restore and polish virtually every aspect of his/her life. The program takes between 6 - 24 months to complete. Objective The participant's goal is to get a score of 100 out of 100. Promise The Clean Sweep Program promises three things will happen as you increase your scores: You will have more energy and vitality. Instructions There are 4 steps to completing the Clean Sweep™ Program. Answer each question. Scoring: Add your totals from the four sections. Important Points: This program is part of establishing a Strong Personal Foundation.

Thunderbird gets GTD'd... « searching4arcadia A few things came together for me this past weekend, and I thought I’d share a bit. First, was MerlinMann’s discussion of the usefulness (or lack thereof) of e-mail folders. I agree completely with Merlin on this one- and I feel a hint of a running thread here- focus on The Work and not on Organization. After all it is “Getting Things Done” not “Organizing Things Nicely”. Second was a post regarding subject line editing I saw a while back on lifehacker.com that stuck in my grey-matter. Third, and finally, was my frustration with effective e-mail “getting things done”. What I’m about to show you can be done on most platforms I believe, and it’s super silly simple, I think. One of the ways I was able to get my “Inbox to Zero” was to implement an action folder. I remembered reading a long time ago on lifehacker.com about editing subject headers to allow for organizing messages. My first foray into images on here… here’s an example of what I mean: Like this: Like Loading... Permalink

merezano : If you don't like to-do lists,... How to Declutter an Entire Room in One Go | Zen Habits Post written by Leo Babauta. Follow me on Twitter. My family is moving to another house this coming weekend, and to prepare for the move, we’re going through the entire house and getting rid of stuff we don’t need. The new house has much less storage, which I’ve decided is a blessing: it means we have to cut things down to the essentials. Moving day, btw, is a wonderful time to declutter. So here’s the method we’re using to declutter each room, one room at a time: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Working like this, we were able to do each room in a couple hours. It feels amazing when you’re done. Now sit back and enjoy the simplicity. More decluttering tips if you don’t want to do an entire room at once: Elsewhere: —Read more about simplifying in my book, The Power of Less.

Coaching Tools 101: The Urgent Important Matrix - What is it and How To Use it! Well, Former US President Eisenhower used this so-called “Eisenhower Principle” to organize his tasks. He is quoted as saying, “What is important is seldom urgent and what is urgent is seldom important.” It was Dr Stephen Covey (of “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People” fame) who took these concepts mainstream, calling it The Urgent Important Matrix in his famous book . Quadrant 1 – Crises or “Important AND Urgent” Tasks What: Tasks that fall into this quadrant include deadlines, urgent meetings, pressing problems, crises and fire-fighting. How we feel: When we spend a lot of time in this quadrant we become stressed and burned out. Action: Minimise the time spent in this quadrant by prioritizing, planning and delegating ie. spending more time in Quadrant 2. Coaching Tip: If your client is in a line management or service based role, they will spend more time in this quadrant than a project manager. Quadrant 2 – Goals and Planning or “Important and Non-Urgent” Tasks

Feeling Stuck? 100 Ways to Change your Life Wise Bread Picks You've got 20 minutes to change your life in 100 ways. Go. This is the premise of an exercise I tried once, when I was feeling stuck in life. After trying (forcefully) to understand what was going on, reading self-help books, filling out aptitude tests, and working with business and life coaches, I was given a suggestion that became a catalyst for some pretty big personal changes. Here is how you can change your life in 20 minutes, step by step: Clear all distractions. Something happens after about 10 or 15 minutes if you employ the exercise to its full potential. Ding! Leave the list alone for a day. The point of this exercise is not to create a giant and outlandish "to-do" list that never gets ticked off. Personally, after feeling stuck and making out my list, I identified a few ways to make positive changes in my life at the time; I joined Toastmasters because an item I wrote down was to become a public speaker.

25 Firefox Extensions to Make You More Productive Firefox is my weapon of choice when it comes to browsing the web. It’s fast, free, and gives the user the best feature ever: Choice. The beauty of the Firefox extension is that it allows you to add a specific feature or function, fully customizing your browsing experience. For someone wanting to make the most of their online time, this is a huge opportunity. Autocopy – The name pretty much says it all. Photo by *keng Tagged as: firefox, firefox-extensions, Productivity

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