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QR Code Classroom Implementation Guide

QR Code Classroom Implementation Guide
QR Codes (Quick Response Codes) are just barcodes. There is nothing fancy about them. Just like the grocery store clerk uses barcodes to look up the product and scan the price into the computer, your mobile device or computer can look up QR codes to: take you to a website, read some text, give you a phone number, or generate a text message. QR Codes are barcodes of information that hardlink the physical world with the online world. They are considered a form of simple augmented reality. QR Codes in the Classroom For the classroom teacher, they are valuable for three reasons: They can save us time.They can save paper.They provide a link to mobile devices that help students do their homework and follow along. This Post. Preparing the Teacher to Use QR Codes The first step of a teaching journey is to embark on learning it yourself. Step 1 Get Your Mobile Device Ready: Download a Free QR Code Reader Step 2: Get Your Computer Ready. You are ready. Common QR Code Problems Readers

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7 Tech Tools for Collaboration Remember when collaborating with your colleagues was limited to early morning meetings or an epically long professional day? Now technology has given us the power to connect on our own time, in dynamic new ways and with teacher friends from around the world. Here are some of our favorite tools for learning from one another, sharing best practices and growing as an educator along the way. 1. Twitter: If Facebook is for connecting with the friends you have in real life, Twitter is for connecting with the friends you wish you had. 50 QR code resources for the classroom As mobile learning and technology is more readily integrated within classroom settings, QR codes can be used as an interesting method to capture a student's attention and make lesson material more interactive. Quick response codes, also known as 'QR' codes, are simple, scannable images that are a form of barcode. By scanning a QR code image through a mobile device, information can be accessed including text, links, bookmarks and email addresses. In the classroom, QR codes can be used in a variety of ways -- from conducting treasure hunts to creating modern CVs. Below is a number of articles, tutorials and lesson plans designed to help educators. Articles and tips

Using Gallery Walks for Revision and Reflection by Charity Allen and John Larmer One of the Eight Essential Elements of Project Based Learning is Revision and Reflection. This important element enables learners to improve their work through the use of feedback from multiple sources – peers, teacher, and expert. However, giving and receiving feedback from others can be tricky. It can take time, and the giver might not know how to frame his or her feedback, both in terms of content and tone. The receiver might take critical feedback personally, or be misled by feedback that is off-target in some way.

Ways to Use QR Codes for Education QR codes are easy to produce and fun to make, and they'll keep every kid's attention. These pixelated bar codes are digital magic for busy teachers! Use them for everything from running scavenger hunts to polling students. Read on for more ways to use the codes in your classroom, or see my post "QR Codes in the Classroom" to start making and scanning your own codes now. 1. How To Use Google Drive and Evernote To Create Digital Portfolios The following post is written by Greg Kulowiec & Beth Holland from EdTechTeacher. You can hear them both present at the April 10-12 EdTechTeacher iPad Summit in Atlanta! As iPads proliferate in schools around the world, and students as well as teachers create more and more content, questions about what to do with all of those learning objects have arisen. In other words, how can we curate this content into portfolios for assessment as well as reflection. Portfolio Curation with Google Drive Source: The Verge

Sharing Kindergarten: QR Codes in the Classroom Little learners are AMAZING at using technology to LEARN. Sometimes WE as teachers are the ones who limit them. One of my passions is using technology in the classroom to LEARN... not to just use technology. The 8 Elements Project-Based Learning Must Have If you’re contemplating using Project-Based Learning or are already trying out the latest craze to hit the modern classroom, you should know about this checklist. It details if you’re actually doing it correctly. For example, does your project focus on significant content, develop 21st century skills, and engage students in in-depth inquirty (just to name a few)? If not, you might want to reconsider your PBL approach.

5 Real Ways To Use QR Codes In Education QR codes… Disposable fad? Or useful technology? Opinions on whether QR codes are of real value is a hotly debated topic. Building Parent Support for Project-Based Learning When a teacher, school or district tells parents, "We're going to do project-based learning," the response may vary. You're lucky if some say, "Great news! Students need to be taught differently these days!" But a more typical response might be: What's project-based learning?That's not how I was taught.

QR Codes – Lesson and Resources In response to recent interest in Quick Response codes I have created some lesson resources to introduce students to QR codes and provide them with some practical experience. The lesson also introduces students to blogging (Digital Learning World) and URL shortening (Bit.Ly and Goo.gl). Students are also encouraged to collaborate by recording their findings in a shared Google document. These resources are intended for Secondary students from Year 7 upwards. Students will need a PC/Laptop with a web cam and access to the Internet.

Why 20% Time is Good for Schools Have you ever met an adult who doesn't really love what they do, but just goes through the motions in their job and everyday life? Have you spoken with men and women who constantly complain, showing no visible passion for anything in the world? I'm sure that, like me, you have met those people. Make your own QR Code Scavenger Hunt! Today was the first day of school. Ever. It was pretty epic. Since the students didn’t know where things were located in the building yet, I thought we would have some fun locating them with a QR code scavenger hunt. How to Trigger Students’ Inquiry Through Projects Inquiry Learning Teaching Strategies Krauss/Boss By Jane Krauss and Suzie Boss QR Codes – What are they and how can I use them in my classroom? A QR Code is a type of barcode that is readable by dedicated QR barcode readers and camera telephones. The code consists of black modules arranged in a square pattern on a white background. The information encoded may be text, URL, or other data*. Like me, you may have seen these codes in newspapers and magazines, on promotional material, in the corner of posters and wondered what they were all about. A square that consists of black and white squares that looks like an out of focus pixilated image?

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