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Spurious Correlations

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Green Honey Language represents our view of the world, and knowing its limits helps us understand how our perception works. I used the data from Wikipedia’s “Color” entry for different languages. My assumption was: "Different languages have different ways to describe color.” Love, Teach: 16 Things You Can Do While Actively Monitoring during Standardized Testing (or the next time you’re crazy bored) I know I use a lot of superlatives, but administering standardized tests is pretty close to the worst. Let’s stop for a second. I know what you’re thinking. “What’s so hard about handing out papers and watching students take a test? That sounds pretty cush to me. Nine Hilariously Awkward Facebook Interactions What happens when you insult the boss you’ve added as a friend and ask a friend if their child is stoned? The most hilariously awkward Facebook interactions ever: My Goatee Isn’t Stupid

I am not an econometrician I am a sta­tis­ti­cian, but I have worked in a depart­ment of pre­dom­i­nantly econo­me­tri­cians for the past 17 years. This has given me an inter­est­ing per­spec­tive on both dis­ci­plines. Last week at my research group meet­ing, I spoke about some of the dif­fer­ences I have noticed. Coin­ci­den­tally, Andrew Gel­man blogged about the same issue a day later. Cultural history via where notable people died A group of researchers used where "notable individuals" were born and place of death, based on data from Freebase, as a lens into culture history. The video explainer below shows some results: From Nature: The team used those data to create a movie that starts in 600 bc and ends in 2012. Biological clock human.svg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Cancel Edit Delete Preview revert Text of the note (may include Wiki markup) Could not save your note (edit conflict or other problem). Please copy the text in the edit box below and insert it manually by editing this page.

52 Of The Most Common Myths and Misconceptions Debunked In One Infographic Did you know that black belts do not indicate ninja-level mastery, adding only a sprinkle of salt to fresh water does not make it boil quicker, and that sharks do get cancer? These are all part of the myths and misconceptions infographic created by London-based author, data-journalist and information designer David McCandless. The chart is organized by colored topic (ie. orange for food and green for nature) and sized relative to its “virulence”—how many hits the question turns up on Google. David McCandless / Information is Beautiful To see all eighty myths and misconceptions, check out the infographic mega-tome Knowledge is Beautiful by David McCandless. Read this next: Apparently, Burning NH4Cr2O7 With HgSCN Opens A Portal To Hell.

11 Things You Won't Believe Governments Have Banned - Oddee.com (banned, governments...) Australia: Porn Featuring Small Breasts Are you an adult woman in Australia with a cup breasts? According to Australia, you don't exist. Do you happen to be a man who likes to watch adult films starring small-breasted women? Neglected machine learning ideas This post is inspired by the “metacademy” suggestions for “leveling up your machine learning.” They make some halfway decent suggestions for beginners. The problem is, these suggestions won’t give you a view of machine learning as a field; they’ll only teach you about the subjects of interest to authors of machine learning books, which is different. The level-3 and level-4 suggestions they make are not super useful either: they just reflect the tastes of the author.

The Best Data Visualization Projects of 2014 It's always tough to pick my favorite visualization projects. I mean, it's a challenge to pick and rank your favorite anything really. So much depends on what you feel like at the time, and there's a lot of good work out there. Nevertheless, I gave it a go. These are my favorites for the year, roughly in order of favorite on down and based on use of data, design, and being useful. Mostly though, my picks are based on gut. Taxonomy of the Logical Fallacies How to Use the Taxonomy | Main Menu Acknowledgments: Thanks to David Goodey and Kent Gustavsson for pointing out missing links. Guns in movies replaced with thumbs-ups [15 pictures] The site Thumbs & Ammo takes stills from violent scenes in movies and replaces the weaponry with that classic symbol of positivity — the thumbs-up — because “real tough guys don’t need guns, they just need a positive, can-do attitude.” The silly edits make for some pretty funny pics (even if the resulting movies would be much more boring). Here are some of the best… Se7en Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope

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