background preloader

Connectivism

Connectivism
Connectivism is a hypothesis of learning which emphasizes the role of social and cultural context. Connectivism is often associated with and proposes a perspective similar to Vygotsky's 'zone of proximal development' (ZPD), an idea later transposed into Engeström's (2001) Activity theory.[1] The relationship between work experience, learning, and knowledge, as expressed in the concept of ‘connectivity, is central to connectivism, motivating the theory's name.[2] It is somewhat similar to Bandura's Social Learning Theory that proposes that people learn through contact. The phrase "a learning theory for the digital age"[3] indicates the emphasis that connectivism gives to technology's effect on how people live, communicate and learn. Nodes and links[edit] The central aspect of connectivism is the metaphor of a network with nodes and connections.[4] In this metaphor, a node is anything that can be connected to another node such as an organization, information, data, feelings, and images.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Connectivism

Related:  SCHOOL REVOLUTION

The Virtual Choir: How We Did It – Blog – Eric Whitacre In the 48 hours since we posted the Lux Aurumque Virtual Choir video soaringleap.com has seen an extraordinary number of new visitors. (Thank you to everyone who has taken an interest and linked here, especially mashable.com and Andrew Sullivan at The Daily Dish). I thought I would take this opportunity to welcome everyone, and give a brief explanation as to how the Virtual Choir came to be.

Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Age Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Age December 12, 2004 George Siemens Update (April 5, 2005): I've added a website to explore this concept at www.connectivism.ca Introduction Behaviorism, cognitivism, and constructivism are the three broad learning theories most often utilized in the creation of instructional environments.

Mobile Consider some of the basic symbols of education in the United States: the textbook, the chalkboard, and the apple. Thanks to technological innovations and cultural forces, we’ve seen textbooks supplanted by videos and e-books, SMART Boards replace chalkboards, and the apple on the teacher’s desk pushed aside by the latest gadgets from, well, Apple. Just as our classrooms have changed significantly since the 1800s, so have our ideas about the purpose of schools. Our views on education were defined by John Dewey's theory, which states—and I'm simplifying—that the general purpose of school is to transfer knowledge and prepare young people to participate in America’s democratic society.

Less Formal Training; More Informal Social Learning This is an excerpt from Sharon Boller’s newest white paper, Learning Trends, Technologies and Opportunities. The white paper describes today’s learning landscape… then predicts 7 trends for the next 12 – 18 months. Here is Trend 6: Twitter chats, Twitter lists, massive open online courses (MOOCs), YouTube channels and blogs devoted to highly specific topics, resources such as Lynda.com, CodeAcademy, etc. are all examples of resources that enable people to build highly customized “personal learning networks” for themselves. Given that the average employee only spends 31 hours PER YEAR in formal training, staying current requires employees to develop skills in social learning tools and strategies. Social learning has been touted by a brave few for a long time – Jane Bozarth and Jay Cross are two big names who’ve been beating the social learning and informal learning drum for the past few years.

Texting 'improves language skill' Text speak, rather than harming literacy, could have a positive effect on the way children interact with language, says a study. Researchers from Coventry University studied 88 children aged between 10 and 12 to understand the impact of text messaging on their language skills. They found that the use of so-called "textisms" could be having a positive impact on reading development. The study is published in the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. "Children's use of textisms is not only positively associated with word reading ability, but it may be contributing to reading development ," the authors wrote in the report. 8 Crucial Resources For Flipped Classrooms Have you “flipped” yet? My colleagues have this week; it’s PSSA week in Pennsylvania (PSSAs are standardized tests.). That’s not the flipped I meant, however. I meant, have you flipped your classroom yet?

CoP: Best Practices by Etienne Wenger [Published in the "Systems Thinker," June 1998] You are a claims processor working for a large insurance company. You are good at what you do, but although you know where your paycheck comes from, the corporation mainly remains an abstraction for you. The group you actually work for is a relatively small community of people who share your working conditions.

Language reaches poor by mobile phone English language lessons are providing a blueprint for the way that mobile phones can be used to deliver education opportunities to communities in some of the poorest parts of the world. In Bangladesh the BBC Janala service, targeted at rural and urban poor, has delivered over 3.5m three-minute audio English language lessons since its launch in November 2009 and last month Nokia, the Finnish handset maker, expanded its Ovi Life Tools suite of information and education content to low-income mobile phone users in Nigeria. Since 2009 Nokia has been rolling out its Ovi Life Tools in China, India and Indonesia, and now claims that it has a total of 6.3 million users. Its Learn English service, which offers vocabulary lessons at three levels of proficiency, are proving to be among its most popular services, alongside price information for farmers and sport and entertainment news. Nokia also believes that support for learner in their first language is a key to success for mlearning.

Teaching Digital Natives: Partnering for Real Learning ShareThis Reading Teaching Digital Natives: Partnering for Real Learning by Marc Prensky was a fantastic experience. This book details the importance of real learning is our students. As a teacher, I am always looking to share connections with my students.

Jean Lave, Etienne Wenger and communities of practice contents: introduction · communities of practice · legitimate peripheral participation and situated learning · learning organizations and learning communities · conclusion · references · links · how to cite this article Many of the ways we have of talking about learning and education are based on the assumption that learning is something that individuals do. Furthermore, we often assume that learning ‘has a beginning and an end; that it is best separated from the rest of our activities; and that it is the result of teaching’ (Wenger 1998: 3). But how would things look if we took a different track? Supposing learning is social and comes largely from of our experience of participating in daily life?

Contemporary Issues in Education Research (CIER) Published since 2008 ISSN 1940-5847 (print), ISSN 1941-756X (online) The Contemporary Issues In Education Research (CIER) welcomes articles in contemporary issues related to research in education. CIER publishes papers that significantly contribute to the understanding of cutting edge issues in education.

Parker J. Palmer: community, knowing and spirituality in education Parker J. Palmer: community, knowing and spirituality in education. Parker J. Palmer’s explorations of education as a spiritual journey and of the inner lives of educators have been deeply influential.

Related: