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Manufacturing: The third industrial revolution

Manufacturing: The third industrial revolution
THE first industrial revolution began in Britain in the late 18th century, with the mechanisation of the textile industry. Tasks previously done laboriously by hand in hundreds of weavers' cottages were brought together in a single cotton mill, and the factory was born. The second industrial revolution came in the early 20th century, when Henry Ford mastered the moving assembly line and ushered in the age of mass production. A number of remarkable technologies are converging: clever software, novel materials, more dexterous robots, new processes (notably three-dimensional printing) and a whole range of web-based services. Towards a third dimension The old way of making things involved taking lots of parts and screwing or welding them together. The applications of 3D printing are especially mind-boggling. Other changes are nearly as momentous. Like all revolutions, this one will be disruptive. The revolution will affect not only how things are made, but where. The shock of the new

IDC Manufacturing Insights to Reveal Top 10 Predictions for 2013 | RoboticsTomorrow Press Release IDC Manufacturing Insights to Reveal Top 10 Predictions for 2013 Visit for further information Webinar emphasizes increasing role of smart services and highlights the third industrial revolution Submitted on 12/04/12, 08:25 AM FRAMINGHAM, Mass. To register, please visit: As a preview to the full list of predictions, IDC Manufacturing Insights expects the following three trends will make an impact on the manufacturing industry in the coming year: *Generational change at the executive level (getting younger) means that investment will be longer term in nature. 2013 will be a year of foundational investments that create capabilities for competitive advantage for the next five years and beyond. *Smart services will take a leading role in manufacturing firms' profitable growth strategies. About IDC Manufacturing Insights

L’impression 3D est-elle le moteur de la fabrication de demain "Il y a une sorte de pensée magique chez les geeks aujourd'hui autour de l'impression 3D", s'énerve Christopher Mims pour la Technology Review. Alors que les imprimantes 3D deviennent accessibles aux amateurs - la Thing-o-Matic de MarkerBot ne coûte que 1 100 dollars - et que Pirate Bay estime que les "physibles" - les plans d'objets qu'on peut réaliser via des machines 3D et qui s'échangent dès à présent sur The Pirate Bay - sont la nouvelle frontière du piratage, des penseurs comme Tim Maly pensent que nous approchons de la fin de "l'expédition". C'est-à-dire qu'il sera bientôt plus coûteux d'expédier une pièce depuis la Chine ou de n'importe quel endroit où elle est fabriquée, que de la fabriquer soi-même. Les promesses de l'impression 3D "Ce n'est pas seulement prématuré, c'est absurde", rétorque Christopher Mims. Pourtant, Christopher Mems ne porte pas un regard hautain sur l'impression 3D. Et Christopher Mims de détailler les progrès qu'il y a encore à accomplir. Hubert Guillaud

Wounded Eagle Gets New 3D Printed Beak After being shot in the face by a poacher seven years ago, Beauty the bald eagle lost most of her beak. Without it, she couldn't feed herself, and likely would have died in the wild. But now, Beauty's getting a second chance at survival in the form of a 3D printed beak. A team of researchers, engineers and dentists created the world's first prosthetic beak, which was modeled with CAD software and 3D-printed from nylon polymers. SEE ALSO: 3D Printing Gives Amputees Custom-Designed Legs [VIDEO] After a two-hour-long procedure, Beauty can now eat and drink by herself, though she's not ready to be released back into the wild. For more on Beauty and her 3D printed beak, check out the video above, and tell us what you think in the comments.

Untitled 3D Printing: The Next 25 Years | Additive Manufacturing (AM) This year’s ASME North American Additive Manufacturing + 3D Printing Conference (AM3D), Boston, Massachusetts will be held August 2-5, 2015 and focus on the engineering behind additive technologies. The event is co-located with the ASME 2015 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference (IDETC/CIE). The AM3D conference will showcase many distinguished experts in the field of additive manufacturing including Hod Lipson, professor of engineering at Columbia University and co-author of the bestselling book, Fabricated: The New World of 3D Printing. As a keynote speaker at AM3D, Professor Lipson’s will present “3D Printing: The Next 25 Years”, exploring emerging trends and applications in additive manufacturing and 3D printing. We caught up with Professor Lipson in an AMazing interview. AMazing®: Professor Lipson, thank you for your participation. AMazing®: How would you assess the current mainstream adoption of 3D printing?

Arkema Presents its Various Materials for “Additive Manufacturing” and Molding Technologies at the EuroMold Trade Show WEBWIRE – Thursday, November 22, 2012 A world leader in high performance polymers, Arkema now offers a diverse range of materials for the manufacture of prototypes and functional technical short runs, using the laser sintering technology, the 3D printing/UV curing process, or molding for high-tech parts. Arkema will showcase its product range at the 19th edition of EuroMold, the global trade show for Moldmaking and Tooling, Design and Product Development, held in Frankfurt from November 27th to 30th. High quality parts fulfilling surface finish or mechanical properties requirements thanks to fine powders for Laser Sintering Laser sintering (LS) is an additive manufacturing technique that uses a laser beam to produce 3D parts by fusing together thermoplastic powders layer by layer. The qualities of these powders make it a most suitable solution for functional prototype manufacture, as well as limited-run (rapid) manufacturing. Related Links Source WebWireID165540

L’impression 3D est-elle le moteur de la fabrication de demain « Il y a une sorte de pensée magique chez les geeks aujourd’hui autour de l’impression 3D », s’énerve Christopher Mims pour la Technology Review. Alors que les imprimantes 3D deviennent accessibles aux amateurs – la Thing-o-Matic de MarkerBot ne coûte que 1 100 dollars – et que Pirate Bay estime que les « physibles » – les plans d’objets qu’on peut réaliser via des machines 3D et qui s’échangent dès à présent sur The Pirate Bay – sont la nouvelle frontière du piratage, des penseurs comme Tim Maly pensent que nous approchons de la fin de « l’expédition ». C’est-à-dire qu’il sera bientôt plus coûteux d’expédier une pièce depuis la Chine ou de n’importe quel endroit où elle est fabriquée, que de la fabriquer soi-même. Les promesses de l’impression 3D Pourtant, Christopher Mems ne porte pas un regard hautain sur l’impression 3D. Et Christopher Mims de détailler les progrès qu’il y a encore à accomplir. La fabrication est plus complexe « Commençons par regarder le mécanisme.

World's Largest 3D Printer Opens To Public Sure, it’s cool that you can use 3D printing tech to fabricate, oh, say, that cute little wearable planter around your neck. But the future of 3D printing is bigger than that. Much bigger. Say, the size of whole house. On September 16, the Dutch architecture firm DUS unveiled the KamerMaker, which it has dubbed “the world’s first movable 3-D print pavilion.” image DUS Architects Such technology stands to revolutionize building and architecture, among other industries. KamerMaker is a distinct step toward that future in that it’s a pavilion itself — so, as its makers point out, it’s big enough to fabricate other pavilions. image via DUS Architects Another scenario where 3D-printed structures could prove handy is disaster relief. Of course, 3D-printed structures lack the benefits of buildings that are shipped with solar power and rainwater harvesting built in (and, in the case of Japan’s Mirai Nihon house, every other self-sufficient, off-grid amenity under the sun).

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