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Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education

Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education
Filed by the ACRL Board on February 2, 2015. Adopted by the ACRL Board, January 11, 2016. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. PDF Version Print copies may be purchased from the Association of College and Research Libraries for $15.00 for a package of 10, including standard postage. Expedited shipping is available for an additional charge. Association of College and Research Libraries Attn: Standards Fulfillment 50 East Huron Street Chicago, IL 60611 To order, call 312-280-2523, or email acrl@ala.org. Contents IntroductionFrames Authority Is Constructed and ContextualInformation Creation as a ProcessInformation Has ValueResearch as InquiryScholarship as ConversationSearching as Strategic Exploration Appendix 1: Implementing the Framework Appendix 2: Background of the Framework Development Appendix 3: Sources for Further Reading For current news and resources see the Framework WordPress site Introduction Notes 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/ilframework

Related:  edWebet #75 - Digital LiteracyLibraries, Reading and Library AdvocacyRéférentielsDigital, Media, and News Literacy (Part II)

Fake-news search engine tracks spread of lies - CNET Now you can map the web of lies. A beta version of Hoaxy, a search engine designed to track fake news, was released Wednesday by Indiana University's Network Science Institute and its Center for Complex Networks and System Research. Hoaxy indexes stories from 132 sites known to produce fake news, such as WashingtonPost.com.co and MSNBC.website, and allows you to see how these sites' links spread across social media. Fake news has plagued the internet and social networks for a long time but has grown in prominence in the past year or so, forcing Facebook to introduce new features to flag false articles.

What the news media can learn from librarians Photo by Rich Grundy We can all agree it’s been a rough season for the news media. Hostile political crowds, accusations of slander, and struggles with what Guardian editor Katharine Viner has called the “waning power of evidence” and “diminishing status of truth.” Today more than ever, the news media’s role as a mediator and gatekeeper of civic discourse is being questioned. Jeffrey Rutenbeck, American University’s Dean of the School of Communication, voiced what many are feeling when he observed in a recent Knight Foundation report, “Journalism has had the luxury of not having to ask itself the existential question of why anyone should pay any attention to us at all.” He proposed an interesting way to tackle the problem.

THRESHOLD ACHIEVEMENT About the Test The Threshold Achievement Test for Information Literacy (TATIL) is being created by a team of experts that includes librarians, professors, and other educators. The test is organized in four modules designed to be administered separately according to the outcomes you want to assess. The content for each module is inspired by one or more of the frames of the ACRL IL Framework. For descriptions of each module, including the outcomes, performance indicators, and dispositions, click on the module title above. You may also download a PDF document with descriptions for all four modules. The information about each module will help you determine which of the modules are most appropriate for your assessment goals for any program in a given year.

Patterns of Deception - Politics Welcome to FlackCheck.org’s Detecting Patterns of Deception, the beta version of a new page designed to help viewers spot and debunk slippery moves in politics. Watch videos on the Climate Change Debate, the Sequester Debate, the Affordable Care Act Debate, the Gun Debate and the Immigration Debate to see patterns of deception in contemporary debates. On the page, we parse misleading political communication into six main categories.

10 Twitter how-tos for Twitter’s 10th birthday – Poynter In honor of 10 years of journalists tweeting (and getting into Twitter fights, tweetstorming and tweeting hot takes), here are 10 guides to using the social network from our archives. These include advice from people such as Craig Silverman, now editor at BuzzFeed Canada, on posting Twitter corrections, Nisha Chittal, manager of social media at MSNBC, on figuring out what's public and private on Twitter, and David Beard, executive editor at PRI, who suggested eight ways to attract followers. 10 ways journalists can use Twitter before, during and after reporting a story By Mallary Jean Tenore, 2011 Reading for pleasure — a door to success The benefits of reading for pleasure are far reaching. Aside from the sheer joy of exercising the imagination, evidence indicates reading for pleasure improves literacy, social skills, health and learning outcomes. It also gives people access to culture and heritage and empowers them to become active citizens, who can contribute to economic and social development. Contents

News literacy vs. media literacy - Columbia Journalism Review Three years ago, pioneer media literacy scholar Renee Hobbs published a short critique of what she viewed as troubling trends emerging in news literacy education. She argued on the site Nieman Reports against teaching news literacy in a way that romanticizes the industry or merely transforms a Journalism 101 class into a news literacy one, teaching students the fundamentals and ideals of the craft. In the comments, there is a lengthy rebuttal from Dean Miller, director of Stony Brook’s Center for News Literacy.

Newspapers: Fact Sheet Last updated June 2016 For newspapers, 2015 might as well have been a recession year. Weekday circulation fell 7% and Sunday circulation fell 4%, both showing their greatest declines since 2010. How Australia's children's authors create magic on a page For a prime example of Australia’s innovation economy in action, look no further than the humble picture book. Staple of bedtime reading, offering textual delights beyond the verbal, picture books are a hidden treasure. Australian picture books sell around the world, and are translated into many languages — take for instance, Jackie French’s iconic Diary of a Wombat (2002), which appears in French, German, Korean, and many more. But though the words need translating, the images, (in French’s book by Bruce Whatley), communicate across language barriers.

Building a Culture of Collaboration® In the wake of a contentious U.S. presidential election cycle, researchers and educators are shining a spotlight on critical “information literacy” skills. Determining authority, accuracy, and bias have long been essential aspects of analyzing content and sources of information. Today, this is no easy task for students (and adults as well) when authors of “information” do their best to deceive readers or hide their identity behind domains, such as .org, factual-seeming but phony statistical data, and authoritative-sounding language based on “pants of fire” lies. News Use Across Social Media Platforms 2016 A majority of U.S. adults – 62% – get news on social media, and 18% do so often, according to a new survey by Pew Research Center, conducted in association with the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. In 2012, based on a slightly different question, 49% of U.S. adults reported seeing news on social media. But which social media sites have the largest portion of users getting news there?

Latest Study: A full-time school librarian makes a critical difference in boosting student achievement By Debra E. Kachel and Keith Curry Lance on March 7, 2013 Illustration by David Flaherty. Imagine trying to teach kids how to swim in an empty pool. That’s exactly what Baruch Kintisch envisioned when he took a hard look at the effects of his city’s deep education cuts. Philadelphia’s “schools are underfunded; classrooms are crowded; libraries, labs, and special-education services are outdated or nonexistent,” writes Kintisch, the director of policy advocacy and a senior staff attorney at the Education Law Center (see the Philadelphia Inquirer’s “City Schools’ Real Problem,” August 9, 2012).

Web Evaluation: Does This Website Smell Funny to You? One of my friends spent this past weekend working with her 2nd grade daughter on a research project. While her daughter flew through the arts and crafts portion and was able to handwrite the “sloppy copy” of her presentation, she struggled when it came to typing the final draft. She didn’t know where the period was. The Intersection of Digital and Media Literacy Because both digital and media literacy are fairly new concepts, there is considerable debate amongst experts and academics around the world as to how they should be defined. It is generally agreed that skills and competencies for digital literacy and media literacy are closely related to each other and to additional “21st-century” skills that are needed for living and working in media- and information-rich societies.[i] For example, the key concepts for media literacy – that media is constructed; that audiences negotiate meaning; that media have commercial, social and political implications; and that each medium has a unique aesthetic form that affects how content is presented – are as equally applicable to watching TV news as to searching for health information online. Digital literacy encompasses the personal, technological, and intellectual skills that are needed to live in a digital world.

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