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Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education

Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education
Filed by the ACRL Board on February 2, 2015. Adopted by the ACRL Board, January 11, 2016. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. PDF Version Print copies may be purchased from the Association of College and Research Libraries for $15.00 for a package of 10, including standard postage. Expedited shipping is available for an additional charge. Payments with a check should be sent to: Association of College and Research Libraries Attn: Standards Fulfillment 225 N. If you have additional questions about ordering the Framework, please contact us at 312-280-5277, or email acrl@ala.org. ACRL has a history of supporting librarians in understanding and using the association’s standards and guidelines. Check for upcoming ACRL eLearning webcasts and online courses. ACRL’s Standards, Guidelines, and Frameworks are provided as a free resource to the academic library community. Contents IntroductionFrames Introduction Notes 1. 2. 3. 4.

http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/ilframework

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20 Creative Bloom's Taxonomy Infographics Everybody Loves Using There is no shortage of Bloom’s Taxonomy infographics online for every teacher. From our own Bloom’s Verbs poster to the resources that can be found on Andrew Churches’ Edorigami, there’s a taxonomy tool for every purpose. (Andrew also created a very helpful chart for checking your lesson components against Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy—you can get it here.)

Critical Evaluation of Information Sources Critical Evaluation of Information Sources Introduction | Evaluation Criteria | Further Reading | Acknowledgements True or false:Information that is published can be trusted because someone other than the author - an editor, a peer reviewer, a publisher, an institution - has reviewed it first. Most would probably agree with this statement, except perhaps when referring to the Internet. However, the reality is that the world of information is rarely black and white, but rather a variety of shades of grey. Consider the following: Journaling as a means to scaffold & assess learning Journaling is like whispering to one’s self and listening at the same time.Mina Murray In an earlier post, I discussed formative and summative assessments, and how they can provide opportunities to support learners. Assessment is a fundamental component of the teaching & learning process. Formative & summative assessments can provide meaningful opportunities to meet the diverse needs of students. Journaling is example of a formative assessment that can be used to help educators anticipate future instruction.

General Format Note: This page reflects the latest version of the APA Publication Manual (i.e., APA 7), which released in October 2019. The equivalent resource for the older APA 6 style can be found here. Please use the example at the bottom of this page to cite the Purdue OWL in APA. To see a side-by-side comparison of the three most widely used citation styles, including a chart of all APA citation guidelines, see the Citation Style Chart. You can also watch our APA vidcast series on the Purdue OWL YouTube Channel.

20 Creative Bloom's Taxonomy Infographics Everybody Loves Using – Wabisabi Learning There is no shortage of Bloom's Taxonomy infographics online for every teacher. We've got some favorites of our own, too. So we decided to do some digging for some of the best Bloom's Taxonomy infographics out there, and bring 20 of them to you in this post. If you're like us, you enjoy experiencing other creative viewpoints and sharing them with those that you feel may benefit from them. No matter what your needs are, the Bloom's graphics below have got something for everyone. We are inherently visual learners, and learning about Bloom's Taxonomy in this manner is powerful and engaging for everyone.

What are the 21st-century skills every student needs? The gap between the skills people learn and the skills people need is becoming more obvious, as traditional learning falls short of equipping students with the knowledge they need to thrive, according to the World Economic Forum report New Vision for Education: Fostering Social and Emotional Learning Through Technology. Today's job candidates must be able to collaborate, communicate and solve problems – skills developed mainly through social and emotional learning (SEL). Combined with traditional skills, this social and emotional proficiency will equip students to succeed in the evolving digital economy. What skills will be needed most?

Building Good Search Skills: What Students Need to Know Getty The Internet has made researching subjects deceptively effortless for students — or so it may seem to them at first. Truth is, students who haven’t been taught the skills to conduct good research will invariably come up short. Navigating the Information Landscape: Resources for Young People As librarians, we are continually challenged and tasked with creating programming that teach multiple literacies — including information literacy, digital literacy, news literacy and media literacy — in fun, engaging and interactive ways. School librarians are in a special position to provide resources to both students and teachers about various kinds of literacy, including digital, news and media. As we move to the midway point in our school year, we thought it might be a good idea to revisit why teaching multiple literacies is important.

What is Design Thinking and Why Is It So Popular? Design Thinking is not an exclusive property of designers—all great innovators in literature, art, music, science, engineering, and business have practiced it. So, why call it Design Thinking? What’s special about Design Thinking is that designers’ work processes can help us systematically extract, teach, learn and apply these human-centered techniques to solve problems in a creative and innovative way – in our designs, in our businesses, in our countries, in our lives. Some of the world’s leading brands, such as Apple, Google, Samsung and GE, have rapidly adopted the Design Thinking approach, and Design Thinking is being taught at leading universities around the world, including d.school, Stanford, Harvard and MIT. But do you know what Design Thinking is?

Educators Need to See Themselves As…. I am working hard on my and Janet Hale’s upcoming book, Documenting Learning- Making Thinking Visible, Meaningful, Shareable, and Amplified with Corwin Press. (Estimated date of publication: Spring 2018). As I am articulate why learners (and specifically educators) should see themselves as documenters, my mind wrapped itself around the following: Educators need to see themselves as more than covering content, lecturers or deliverers of prescribed/established curriculum. We live in a time, where we learn, how we learn, when we learn and with whom we learn changes at an exponential rate. Now more than ever, we can’t rely on the old tried and tested methodology or practices, because the rules of what it means to teach and learn have changed. From Written to Digital: The New Literacy Both the 21st-century economy and the careers needed to fuel it are changing at an unprecedented rate. Students must be prepared for nonlinear careers, pivoting to match the ever-changing work landscape. We thus need to rethink not just how we teach our students but what we teach our students. The people who were comfortable at this humanities-technology intersection helped to create the human-machine symbiosis that is at the core of this story.

How to (seriously) read a scientific paper Adam Ruben’s tongue-in-cheek column about the common difficulties and frustrations of reading a scientific paper broadly resonated among Science Careers readers. Many of you have come to us asking for more (and more serious) advice on how to make sense of the scientific literature, so we’ve asked a dozen scientists at different career stages and in a broad range of fields to tell us how they do it. Although it is clear that reading scientific papers becomes easier with experience, the stumbling blocks are real, and it is up to each scientist to identify and apply the techniques that work best for them. The responses have been edited for clarity and brevity.

How to Spot Bullshit: A Primer by Princeton Philosopher Harry Frankfurt We live in an age of truthiness. Comedian Stephen Colbert coined the word to describe the Bush administration’s tendency to fudge the facts in its favor. Ten years after the American Dialect Society named it Word of the Year, former president Bush’s calendar is packed with such leisure activities as golf and painting portraits of world leaders, but "truthiness" remains on active duty. It’s particularly germane in this election year, though politicians are far from its only practitioners. Take global warming.

ASSURE model - Learning Theories ETC547 Spring 2011 What Is It? The ASSURE model is a six-step Instructional Systems Design (ISD), intended to help teachers utilize technology and media in the classroom. ASSURE is a way to ensure that the learning environment is appropriate for students. ASSURE can be used in lesson plans to improve your own teaching and your students’ learning while using technology. The ASSURE acronym stands for these important components: · A- Analyze Learners

An important framework to keep in mind when drafting lesson plans for any academic IL course. by jb16g Mar 1

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