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Carl Rogers

Carl Rogers
Carl Ransom Rogers (January 8, 1902 – February 4, 1987) was an influential American psychologist and among the founders of the humanistic approach (or client-centered approach) to psychology. Rogers is widely considered to be one of the founding fathers of psychotherapy research and was honored for his pioneering research with the Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions by the American Psychological Association (APA) in 1956. The person-centered approach, his own unique approach to understanding personality and human relationships, found wide application in various domains such as psychotherapy and counseling (client-centered therapy), education (student-centered learning), organizations, and other group settings. For his professional work he was bestowed the Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Psychology by the APA in 1972. Biography[edit] Rogers was born on January 8, 1902, in Oak Park, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago. Theory[edit] Nineteen propositions[edit] Related:  What is happy?

Otto Rank Otto Rank (April 22, 1884 – October 31, 1939) was an Austrian psychoanalyst, writer, and teacher. Born in Vienna as Otto Rosenfeld, he was one of Sigmund Freud's closest colleagues for 20 years, a prolific writer on psychoanalytic themes, an editor of the two most important analytic journals, managing director of Freud's publishing house and a creative theorist and therapist. In 1926, Otto Rank left Vienna for Paris. For the remaining 14 years of his life, Rank had a successful career as a lecturer, writer and therapist in France and the U.S. (Lieberman & Kramer, 2012). In the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society[edit] In 1905, at the age of 21, Otto Rank presented Freud with a short manuscript on the artist, a study that so impressed Freud he invited Rank to become Secretary of the emerging Vienna Psychoanalytic Society. All emotional experience by human beings was being reduced by analysis to a derivative, no matter how disguised, of libido. Post-Vienna life and work[edit] Influence[edit]

Abraham Maslow Abraham Harold Maslow (/ˈmæzloʊ/[citation needed]; April 1, 1908 – June 8, 1970) was an American psychologist who was best known for creating Maslow's hierarchy of needs, a theory of psychological health predicated on fulfilling innate human needs in priority, culminating in self-actualization.[2] Maslow was a psychology professor at Brandeis University, Brooklyn College, New School for Social Research and Columbia University. He stressed the importance of focusing on the positive qualities in people, as opposed to treating them as a "bag of symptoms. Biography[edit] Youth[edit] Born and raised in Brooklyn, New York, Maslow was the oldest of seven children and was classed as "mentally unstable" by a psychologist. College and university[edit] Academic career[edit] He continued his research at Columbia University, on similar themes. Death[edit] While jogging, Maslow suffered a severe heart attack and died on June 8, 1970 at the age of 62 in Menlo Park, California.[23][24] Legacy[edit] [edit]

david a. kolb on experiential learning Contents: introduction · david a. kolb · david kolb on experiential learning · david kolb on learning styles · issues · developments – jarvis on learning · a guide to reading · links · how to cite this piece As Stephen Brookfield (1983: 16) has commented, writers in the field of experiential learning have tended to use the term in two contrasting senses. On the one hand the term is used to describe the sort of learning undertaken by students who are given a chance to acquire and apply knowledge, skills and feelings in an immediate and relevant setting. The second type of experiential learning is ‘education that occurs as a direct participation in the events of life’ (Houle 1980: 221). Much of the literature on experiential learning, as Peter Jarvis comments (1995: 75), ‘is actually about learning from primary experience, that is learning through sense experiences’. Village One is concerned particularly with assessing and accrediting learning from life and work experience…. Issues

Fritz Perls Friedrich (Frederick) Salomon Perls (July 8, 1893 – March 14, 1970), better known as Fritz Perls, was a noted German-born psychiatrist and psychotherapist. Perls coined the term 'Gestalt therapy' to identify the form of psychotherapy that he developed with his wife, Laura Perls, in the 1940s and 1950s. Perls became associated with the Esalen Institute in 1964, and he lived there until 1969. His approach to psychotherapy is related to, but not identical to, Gestalt psychology, and it is different from Gestalt Theoretical Psychotherapy. The core of the Gestalt Therapy process is enhanced awareness of sensation, perception, bodily feelings, emotion, and behavior, in the present moment. Perls has been widely cited outside the realm of psychotherapy for a quotation often described as the "Gestalt prayer". I do my thing and you do your thing.I am not in this world to live up to your expectations, and you are not in this world to live up to mine. Life[edit] Death[edit] Bibliography[edit]

Self-actualization Self-actualization is a term that has been used in various psychology theories, often in slightly different ways. The term was originally introduced by the organismic theorist Kurt Goldstein for the motive to realize one's full potential. Expressing one's creativity, quest for spiritual enlightenment, pursuit of knowledge, and the desire to give to society are examples of self-actualization. In Goldstein's view, it is the organism's master motive, the only real motive: "the tendency to actualize itself as fully as possible is the basic drive... the drive of self-actualization. As Abraham Maslow noted, the basic needs of humans must be met (e.g. food, shelter, warmth, security, sense of belongingness) before a person can achieve self-actualization - the need to be good, to be fully alive and to find meaning in life. In Goldstein's theory[edit] Maslow's hierarchy of needs[edit] Maslow's characteristics of self-actualizers[edit] Maslow's self-actualizing characteristics In psychology[edit]

Challenging the Presentation Paradigm with the 1/1/5 Rule A measure of how bad presentations in academia can be is the sheer number of tips and strategies we’ve suggested on ProfHacker, in a recurring series called Challenging the Presentation Paradigm. One of these techniques I’ve used in my classes for several years is the Pecha Kucha format. With 20 slides at 20 seconds per slide, a Pecha Kucha is, as Jason writes, necessarily “SHORT, INFORMAL, and CREATIVE.” However, as I’ve found out the hard way, a Pecha Kucha format does not necessarily mean students will avoid text-heavy slides, one of the major causes of DBP (Death By PowerPoint). That’s why I’ve begun implementing what I call the 1/1/5 rule for all student presentations. Here’s how I describe the 1/1/5 rule to my students: In addition to the time constraint of the Pecha Kucha, your presentation must also follow the 1/1/5 rule. The 1/1/5 rule is just a small tweak, but it has made all the difference. Have you tried similar techniques in your classrooms? Return to Top

Wilhelm Reich Wilhelm Reich (/raɪx/; German: [ʀaɪç], 24 March 1897 – 3 November 1957) was an Austrian psychoanalyst, a member of the second generation of psychoanalysts after Sigmund Freud, and one of the most radical figures in the history of psychiatry. He was the author of several influential books, most notably Character Analysis (1933) and The Mass Psychology of Fascism (1933).[2] His work on character contributed to the development of Anna Freud's The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defence (1936), and his idea of muscular armour – the expression of the personality in the way the body moves – shaped innovations such as body psychotherapy, Fritz Perls's Gestalt therapy, Alexander Lowen's bioenergetic analysis, and Arthur Janov's primal therapy. His writing influenced generations of intellectuals: during the 1968 student uprisings in Paris and Berlin, students scrawled his name on walls and threw copies of The Mass Psychology of Fascism at the police.[3] Early life[edit] Childhood[edit]

40 Photo-Illustrated Questions to Refocus Your Mind Asking the right questions is the answer… It’s not the answers you get from others that will help you, but the questions you ask of yourself. Here are 40 thought-provoking questions to help you refresh and refocus your thinking: Please share your thoughts with us in the comments section below. Also, check out our sister site, Thought Questions, for more photo-illustrated questions like these; and check out The Book of Questions if you’re interested in reading even more inspiring, thought-provoking questions.Title photo by: Helga Weber For all other photo credits please refer to ThoughtQuestions.com Related 40 Questions Everyone is Afraid to Ask Judge a man by his questions rather than his answers. April 13, 2012 In "Aspirations" 40 Questions that Will Quiet Your Mind Judge a person by their questions, rather than their answers … because asking the right questions is the answer. August 5, 2015 In "Happiness" 25 Photo-Illustrated Reminders to Help You Find Happiness

B. F. Skinner Burrhus Frederic (B. F.) Skinner (March 20, 1904 – August 18, 1990) was an American psychologist, behaviorist, author, inventor, and social philosopher.[1][2][3][4] He was the Edgar Pierce Professor of Psychology at Harvard University from 1958 until his retirement in 1974.[5] Skinner invented the operant conditioning chamber, also known as the Skinner Box.[6] He was a firm believer of the idea that human free will was actually an illusion and any human action was the result of the consequences of that same action. He innovated his own philosophy of science called radical behaviorism,[9] and founded his own school of experimental research psychology—the experimental analysis of behavior, coining the term operant conditioning. Skinner discovered and advanced the rate of response as a dependent variable in psychological research. Biography[edit] The Skinners' grave at Mount Auburn Cemetery In 1936, Skinner married Yvonne Blue. Theory[edit] Schedules of reinforcement[edit] Air crib[edit]

Quotes to Inspire Teachers & Learners of English Inspirational Quotes for Teachers and Learners For Teachers "Awaken people's curiosity. "A teacher affects eternity; he can never tell where his influence stops." - Henry Brooks Adams "A teacher is one who makes himself progressively unnecessary." - Thomas Carruthers " A teacher who is attempting to teach, without inspiring the pupil with a desire to learn, is hammering on a cold iron." - Horace Mann (1796-1859) "Education costs money, but then so does ignorance." - Sir Claus Moser "Education...is a painful, continual and difficult work to be done in kindness, by watching, by warning,... by praise, but above all -- by example." - John Ruskin "Education's purpose is to replace an empty mind with an open one." - Malcolm Forbes "Education should turn out the pupil with something he knows well and something he can do well." - Alfred North Whitehead "Getting things done is not always what is most important. "Give me a fish and I eat for a day. "Good teachers are those who know how little they know.

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