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Resources for growth and learning mindsets

Resources for growth and learning mindsets

https://www.mindsetkit.org/

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Growth Mindset: How to Normalize Mistake Making and Struggle in Class Carol Dweck’s research on growth mindset has become essential knowledge in education circles. The Stanford psychologist found that children who understand that their brains are malleable and can change when working through challenging problems can do better in school. Now, many school districts are attempting to teach growth mindset to their students. At the core of this practice is the idea of “productive failure” (a concept Dr. Manu Kapur has been studying for over a decade)* and giving students the time and space to work through difficult problems. Another key idea is to praise the process and effort a child puts in, not the final product.

Academic Motivation Research PERTS stands for the Project for Education Research That Scales. It is an applied research center at Stanford University. Our team partners with schools, colleges, and other organizations to improve student motivation and achievement on a large scale. conceptual understanding rubric – What Ed Said What do you notice about Audri as a learner? We begin our Year 4 collaborative planning session with Audri… to generate thinking about the ways young learners own their learning, outside the classroom… The teachers notice and name his confidence, persistence, belief in himself, resourcefulness, curiosity, commitment, ownership of learning, enthusiasm, excitement... Layla wonders if Audri’s uniqueness and enthusiasm would be stifled in a traditional school setting. Jina responds that she is excited by the possibilities of creating such authentic learning opportunities in her classroom. Watching an extract from Guy Claxton on building learning power adds another layer to our conversation:

Growth Mindset resource and Why do kids need to learn to struggle? As adults we all know the most rewarding experiences in life often involve significant struggle and sacrifice at some stage. Personally the greatest joys in my life have all come with some form of struggle… Being married. We are very happily married, but that doesn’t mean we are always very happy with one another. Helping Students Start the School Year With a Positive Mindset For students who have had trouble in school, or who have had a negative summer, it is especially important to get the school year off to a fresh start. And for all students, having a positive mindset makes learning much more likely. Here are four activities to help accomplish these goals. Identity and Purpose: Who Am I?

Growth mindset theory is 'overplayed' and could be harmful, geneticist warns A leading geneticist has challenged the hugely popular growth mindset theory about pupils’ attainment, warning that it is “greatly overplayed” and could even be harmful to children. Robert Plomin, professor of behavioural genetics at King’s College London, voiced his concerns in an exclusive interview with TES. The growth mindset theory, developed by Stanford University-based psychologist Professor Carol Dweck, states that an individual’s learning is shaped by whether they believe their intelligence is fixed or can be changed. Those with a growth mindset believe they can improve their abilities through effort and effective learning techniques, the theory states. But those with a fixed mindset believe their abilities are largely innate and are less likely to try to improve their academic performance through effort.

When Memorization Gets in the Way of Learning - Ben Orlin I once caught an 11th-grader who snuck a cheat sheet into the final exam. At first, he tried to shuffle it under some scratch paper. When I cornered him, he shifted tactics. "It's my page of equations," he told me.

Growth Mindset: How to Normalize Mistake Making and Struggle in Class Carol Dweck’s research on growth mindset has become essential knowledge in education circles. The Stanford psychologist found that children who understand that their brains are malleable and can change when working through challenging problems can do better in school. Now, many school districts are attempting to teach growth mindset to their students.

'Praise the effort, not the outcome? Think again' Always try to praise the effort, not the outcome. That’s the lesson that parents and teachers often take from my work. But it’s the wrong lesson, or it can easily become so. Yes, the research that underpins growth mindset theory does show that praising children’s hard work or strategies when they’ve done well – “process praise” – has a number of positive effects.

Practice Math Like a Baby I’ve always felt conflicted about repetitive practice. On the one hand, I see how vital practice is. Musicians repeat the same piece again and again. Soccer players run drills. Chefs hone their chopping motion. Village Workshop with Kathi Camilleri Many years ago the size of dugout canoes were substantially larger. The nations that were paddling in the coastal waters would fit 40 people in one tree. Nowadays, finding a cedar of such size is a task that even the most adventurous would have difficulties achieving if at all. It is common for people making dugouts to use two cedars interlocking them together so a larger size can be created. This was the idea that Kathi Camilleri had in mind when she was creating her village workshop, the idea that those with different backgrounds can finally be together as one. When the workshop began, the circle took up the entire floor of the Klahoose Multi-Purpose Building.

ISTE 2015 Discover strategies for increasing your growth mindset as an educator and assisting your learners in developing strong, academic mindsets. We'll guide you through interactive, experiential online activities. Recommended by ISTE’s Administrator Network Purpose & objective

Why the Phrase 'It’s Not So Bad' Causes Treatment Problems Editor’s note: This adaptation comes from a blog post written by Tatyana Elleseff for her Smart Speech Therapy blog. A few days ago, my higher-ups asked for a second opinion regarding a psychological evaluation on an 11-year-old boy who was displaying a pattern of deficits with no reasonable justification. I formed a working hypothesis, but needed more evidence. So, I set out to collect more information by interviewing professionals treating the student.

Aboriginal Education (Note: What follows is a letter I wrote to Laura Tait, District Principal for Aboriginal Education in Nanaimo School District, BC, after meeting with her the other day.) Dear Laura, This morning I came to you with some questions – questions that have paralyzed me for the past five years. About seven years ago, during my first year of teaching, I had a conversation with a colleague while carpooling home one day. Tom asked me what was my big goal – my big motivation for teaching. “To make things better,” I said.

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