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AI gets involved with the law. (Image: Paul Taylor/Corbis) IF YOU are hoping for parole, you better hope the judge has just eaten.

AI gets involved with the law

A recent study of the behaviour of parole board judges revealed this interesting human trait. The law isn’t supposed to put the rumbling of stomachs above fact and reason, but that’s the problem when those charged with administering it are human. Computers may be able to help. Software tools are already important in the legal world, especially for big cases like company mergers, where algorithms help people comb through vast piles of documents. But the application of artificial intelligence to the law promises to go beyond document mining. NextLaw Labs. Report: artificial intelligence will cause "structural collapse" of law firms by 2030.

AI: computers that ‘think’ spell doom for many lawyers Robots and artificial intelligence (AI) will dominate legal practice within 15 years, perhaps leading to the “structural collapse” of law firms, a report predicting the shape of the legal market has envisaged.

Report: artificial intelligence will cause "structural collapse" of law firms by 2030

Civilisation 2030: The near future for law firms, by Jomati Consultants, foresees a world in which population growth is actually slowing, with “peak humanity” occurring as early as 2055, and ageing populations bringing a growth in demand for legal work on issues affecting older people. This could mean more advice needed by healthcare and specialist construction companies on the building and financing of hospitals, and on pension investment businesses, as well as financial and regulatory work around the demographic changes to come; more age-related litigation, IP battles between pharmaceutical companies, and around so-called “geriatric-tech” related IP. The human part of lawyering would shrink. Leave a comment. Legal Technology Breaking News. Data Visualisation Products - Encompass the full picture, fast.

#strategictechnologyforum - Recherche sur Twitter. LexisNexis UK – Butterworths – Tolley Innovative Business, Legal Solutions. IT - Page 1. Home - Legal Week Strategic Technology Forum 2016. Screen test - making legal apps as easy to use as Amazon. Panellists at the Legal Week Strategic Technology Forum explain how they are trying to make software intuitive to use Ricardo Ortega, co-founder and head of design, Keep It Usable: There are many elements to user experience (UX) and many skills, practices and techniques that go into it.

Screen test - making legal apps as easy to use as Amazon

One of the techniques we use in order to improve the end user experience is to devise personas that characterise the target users. We research our target users and get to know them – their likes and dislikes, the software that they use on a daily basis, some of the internet sites they use, their preferred devices and much more. You can then use these personas as the reference point when designing your software. The gov.uk websites are examples of sites that are designed around the end user and work on any kind of device using best practice. There is an iterative cycle that goes on until they’re really happy with the designs. Cameron: Lawyers from clients? Garnish: Yes, from clients. Home - Legal Week Strategic Technology Forum 2016. 'Agile and flexible' - leading IT directors outline their visions for the future. Artificial intelligence, security and mobility are among the challenges highlighted by five IT directors at top firms Colin Smith, IT director, Pinsent Masons What's been your biggest initiative or project this year?

'Agile and flexible' - leading IT directors outline their visions for the future

Our mobility strategy - putting together a corporate strategic road map, recommendation and multi-phase deployment programme, covering everything from smart phones and hybrid devices to an enterprise mobile device management platform. Highlight a technological development that most excites you. Recognising that legacy 'historic' controls are not servicing the best efficiencies of how our employees need to work. What are your 3 main priorities for 2016? What is your biggest long-term challenge and the opportunity it presents?

Danny O'Connor, head of IT, Sackers What's been your biggest initiative or project this year? Highlight a technological development that most excites you. What are your three main priorities for 2016? How law firms can leverage technology for profitability. Regulatory Scrutiny and Compliance Drive Demand from Law Firms and Corporates in China for Ediscovery Services from Kroll Ontrack. SHANGHAI & HONG KONG--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Kroll Ontrack, the leading global provider of ediscovery technologies and services to companies involved in litigation and investigations, today announced the availability of its ediscovery capabilities to clients in China.

Regulatory Scrutiny and Compliance Drive Demand from Law Firms and Corporates in China for Ediscovery Services from Kroll Ontrack

There is growing awareness in China of the need to consider electronic evidence in legal proceedings. In countries like the US and UK there is a formal duty in litigation to carry out ediscovery, which involves searching for and producing electronic documents relevant in a case. The quiet revolution – poll of 2,000 lawyers reveals law firms are waking up to power of technology. Spare a thought for law firm IT directors.

The quiet revolution – poll of 2,000 lawyers reveals law firms are waking up to power of technology

They can see much further into the future than most lawyers; they endure sleepless nights worrying about the storage and security of big data; and they are typically fascinated by the potential of artificial intelligence to disrupt the traditional law firm business model. But the broader challenge for many firms is less strategic and more immediate: getting their lawyers to adopt current technological changes and fully integrate new technologies into the daily processes of their working lives. When examining the findings of the eleventh annual Legal Week Best Technology Report, which draws on the responses of 2,159 fee-earners, support staff and partners at international and UK law firms, a quiet revolution appears to be taking place. The survey, which asks respondents to rate the technology at their disposal, covers hardware, software, security, mobile working, support and the impact of technology on workloads and client service. Better training.