background preloader

Differences Between American and British English

Differences Between American and British English
By Kenneth Beare While there are certainly many more varieties of English, American English and British English are the two varieties that are taught in most ESL/EFL programs. Generally, it is agreed that no one version is "correct" however, there are certainly preferences in use. The three major differences between between American and British English are: Pronunciation - differences in both vowel and consonants, as well as stress and intonation Vocabulary - differences in nouns and verbs, especially phrasal verb usage Spelling - differences are generally found in certain prefix and suffix forms The most important rule of thumb is to try to be consistent in your usage. Use of the Present Perfect continue reading below our video Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% In British English the present perfect is used to express an action that has occurred in the recent past that has an effect on the present moment. I've lost my key. In British English the above would be considered incorrect. British English:

http://esl.about.com/od/toeflieltscambridge/a/dif_ambrit.htm

Related:  English speaking countriesAround the worldcours

Listen to English around the World. Click on any of the flags below to hear accents from some of the main English-speaking countries. Hear more English accents. One of the best ways of improving your English is to listen to radio news and discussion in English on your computer. Using the links below you can get instant access to English language radio news programmes wherever you are in the world, without a radio. FASTEN SEAT BELTS 2 - Travel by Continent - Europe Fasten Seat Belts, a light hearted guide to avoid misunderstandings while travelling. An innovative way to learn languages and pick up cultural tips. Travel by Continent / Europe

45 ways to avoid using the word 'very' Writers Write is your one-stop resource for writers. Use these 45 ways to avoid using the word ‘very’ to improve your writing. Good writers avoid peppering their writing with qualifiers like ‘very’ and ‘really’. They are known as padding or filler words and generally add little to your writing.

10 Top Tourist Attractions in the USA As one of the largest and most diverse countries in the world, The United States boast an amazing amount of tourist destinations ranging from the skyscrapers of New York and Chicago, the natural wonders of Yellowstone and Alaska to the sunny beaches of California, Florida and Hawaii. With so many tourist attractions it’s tempting to list entire cities or even states, but in this top 10 I have tried to focus on specific attractions. 10White House The White House in Washington DC is the official residence and office of the President of the United States. It was built between 1792 and 1800 and first used by President John Adams. After the 9/11 attacks it has become more difficult to visit the White House and today tours are available only for groups of 10 or more and must be requested up to six months in advance through your member of Congress or your country’s US Ambassador.

Project-based learning, the USA and Authentic Video in the EFL classroom The Globe Trekker/Pilot Guides video collection is a treasure trove for any English teacher. It encompasses extensive material from every corner of the world, and especially English-speaking countries are lavished with attention. Australia, Canada, Scotland, Wales, Ireland, England – you name it. Even individual cities are endowed with an approx. 50-minute complete video of its own, like London, New York City, San Francisco, Los Angeles, New Orleans to name but a few. Covering the United States satisfactorily in the language classroom is a daunting project, especially if you want to give your students more than a superficial understanding of its history, geography, language and people. Most textbooks for EFL students fall short in this respect, and it’s understandable – time available is limited and there is so much more that needs to be covered.

5 TED-Ed Lessons to use in your American History classroom Carla Staffa, Burnsville Senior High School American history teacher (and all-around rockstar), uses TED-Ed Lessons in her classroom to supplement her curriculum, start conversation and spark curiosity. We caught up with Carla to find out which lessons she uses the most and what she hopes her students take away from each one. 1.) The fight for the right to vote in the United States - Nicki Beaman Griffin “The fight for the acquisition of voting rights is one that has been fought by numerous groups, yet not all eligible voters take advantage of this right. Shopping for the Day Shopping online or at local department stores is an activity many people enjoy. How often do you go shopping for the following items and where do you buy them: clothing, gifts for friends and family, music, DVD movies, electronics? Listen to the conversation by pressing the "Play" button, and answer the questions. Press the "Final Score" button to check your quiz. [ Other Audio Options: Play RealMedia | Play Window Media ]

United States PEOPLE & CULTURE Throughout its history, the United States has been a nation of immigrants. The population is diverse with people from all over the world seeking refuge and a better way of life. The country is divided into six regions: New England; the mid-Atlantic; the South; the Midwest; the Southwest, and the West. European settlers came to New England in search of religious freedom.

Related:  a1