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Fluxus

Fluxus
Fluxus—a name taken from a Latin word meaning "flow, flux" (noun); "flowing, fluid" (adj.)[1]—is an international network of artists, composers and designers noted for blending different artistic media and disciplines in the 1960s. They have been active in Neo-Dada noise music and visual art as well as literature, urban planning, architecture, and design. Fluxus is sometimes described as intermedia. The Fluxus movement... developed its 'anti-art', anti-commercial aesthetics under the leadership of George Maciunas. History to 1965[edit] Origins[edit] Flux Year Box 2, c.1967, a Flux box edited and produced by George Maciunas, containing works by many early Fluxus artists. The origins of Fluxus lie in many of the concepts explored by composer John Cage in his experimental music of the 1950s. Fluxus started with the work, and then came together, applying the name Fluxus to work which already existed. Early Fluxus and Neo-Dada[edit] European festivals and the Fluxkits[edit] History, 1965-78[edit] Related:  Art Moderne & Contemporain [en cours...]

André Breton André Breton (French: [ɑ̃dʁe bʁətɔ̃]; 19 February 1896 – 28 September 1966) was a French writer and poet. He is known best as the founder of Surrealism. His writings include the first Surrealist Manifesto (Manifeste du surréalisme) of 1924, in which he defined surrealism as "pure psychic automatism". Biography[edit] Born to a family of modest means in Tinchebray (Orne) in Normandy, he studied medicine and psychiatry. During World War I he worked in a neurological ward in Nantes, where he met the devotee of Alfred Jarry, Jacques Vaché, whose anti-social attitude and disdain for established artistic tradition influenced Breton considerably. Breton married his first wife, Simone Kahn, on 15 September 1921. From Dada to Surrealism[edit] In 1919 Breton initiated the review Littérature with Louis Aragon and Philippe Soupault. In a publication The Magnetic Fields (Les Champs Magnétiques), a collaboration with Soupault, he implemented the principle of automatic writing. 1940s[edit] Marriages[edit]

UbuWeb Fluxus Movement, Artists and Major Works | The Art Story "In Fluxus there has never been any attempt to agree on aims or methods; individuals with something unnamable in common have simply naturally coalesced to publish and perform their work. Perhaps this common thing is a feeling that the bounds of art are much wider than they have conventionally seemed, or that art and certain long established bounds are no longer very useful." Synopsis Fluxus was a loosely organized group of artists that spanned the globe, but had an especially strong presence in New York City. George Maciunas is historically considered the primary founder and organizer of the movement, who described Fluxus as, "a fusion of Spike Jones, gags, games, Vaudeville, Cage and Duchamp." Key Ideas Unlike previous artistic movements, Fluxus sought to change the history of the world, not just the history of art. Fluxus art involved the viewer, relying on the element of chance to shape the ultimate outcome of the piece. Most Important Art Beginnings Concepts and Styles Fluxus and Zen

Google Paul Cézanne Paul Cézanne (US /seɪˈzæn/ or UK /sɨˈzæn/; French: [pɔl sezan]; 1839–1906) was a French artist and Post-Impressionist painter whose work laid the foundations of the transition from the 19th-century conception of artistic endeavour to a new and radically different world of art in the 20th century. Cézanne's often repetitive, exploratory brushstrokes are highly characteristic and clearly recognizable. He used planes of colour and small brushstrokes that build up to form complex fields. The paintings convey Cézanne's intense study of his subjects. Cézanne can be said to form the bridge between late 19th-century Impressionism and the early 20th century's new line of artistic enquiry, Cubism. §Life and work[edit] §Early years and family[edit] Femme au Chapeau Vert (Woman in a Green Hat. Going against the objections of his banker father, he committed himself to pursuing his artistic development and left Aix for Paris in 1861. §Cézanne the artist[edit] §Optical phenomena[edit] §Death[edit]

Bidoun Magazine Noise music Tellus13 Noise music is a term used to describe varieties of avant-garde music and sound art that may use elements such as cacophony, dissonance, atonality, noise, indeterminacy, and repetition in their realization. Noise music can feature distortion, various types of acoustically or electronically generated noise, randomly produced electronic signals, and non-traditional musical instruments. Noise music may also incorporate manipulated recordings, static, hiss and hum, feedback, live machine sounds, custom noise software, circuit bent instruments, and non-musical vocal elements that push noise towards the ecstatic.[1] The Futurist art movement was important for the development of the noise aesthetic, as was the Dada art movement, and later the Surrealist and Fluxus art movements, specifically the Fluxus artists Joe Jones and Takehisa Kosugi.[2] During the early 1900s a number of art music practitioners began exploring atonality.

Elevator to the Gallows (1958

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