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ARTICLE: Being a Better Online Reader - New Yorker

ARTICLE: Being a Better Online Reader - New Yorker
Soon after Maryanne Wolf published “Proust and the Squid,” a history of the science and the development of the reading brain from antiquity to the twenty-first century, she began to receive letters from readers. Hundreds of them. While the backgrounds of the writers varied, a theme began to emerge: the more reading moved online, the less students seemed to understand. There were the architects who wrote to her about students who relied so heavily on ready digital information that they were unprepared to address basic problems onsite. There were the neurosurgeons who worried about the “cut-and-paste chart mentality” that their students exhibited, missing crucial details because they failed to delve deeply enough into any one case. And there were, of course, the English teachers who lamented that no one wanted to read Henry James anymore. Certainly, as we turn to online reading, the physiology of the reading process itself shifts; we don’t read the same way online as we do on paper.

http://www.newyorker.com/science/maria-konnikova/being-a-better-online-reader

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