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One Woman, 17 British Accents - Anglophenia Ep 5

One Woman, 17 British Accents - Anglophenia Ep 5

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FyyT2jmVPAk

Related:  speakingBritish AccentsSpeakcommunicationAccents

26 Fresh ESL Conversation Starters to Get Students Talking! 10 Oct I love teaching conversation in the ESL classroom. Part of it must be that because the students able to “converse” in English are better able to demonstrate their personalities, preferences, thoughts… and therefore, I get to know them better. Often it is simply hilarious to see the range of answers students feel free to share in a comfortable environment. If you’re a conversation teacher in an English as a Second Language classroom, there may be times when you feel as though you want fresh ideas, a change in routine or some way to remain slightly unpredictable so your students remain curious as to what tricks you have up your sleeves.

English Vowel Chart - Improve Your Accent All the words on the chart have been carefully selected so that they form minimal pairs. beat and bit are an example of a minimal pair. The words sound the same apart from one sound – the vowel in the middle. Notice the IPA transcriptions: /biːt/ – /bɪt/.

Speech Analysis: How to Critique a Speech Published: Jan 18th, 2008 Studying other speakers is a critical skill, one of the 25 essential skills for a public speaker. The ability to analyze a speech will accelerate the growth of any speaker. The Speech Analysis Series is a series of articles examining different aspects of presentation analysis. You will learn how to study a speech and how to deliver an effective speech evaluation. Later articles will examine Toastmasters evaluation contests and speech evaluation forms and resources. Formal and informal emails and letters useful links My formal and informal emails and letters classroom materials Examples of several kinds of formal email and two informal emails Exercises on those emails

English to Slang That's a lovely kettle [Thanks to Mark Sparrow. I got the following from Dudley who wondered about the connection between a kettle and a watch - he passed on the following story: It was commonplace for everyone to wear a pocket watch and chain in the waistcoat & it was also equally commonplace for the watch to be in the pawn shop as an interim loan security - however no one was keen for people to know that this situation was necessary, so the chain would be kept and worn as normal. In the kitchens of the day the fire would be an open one and there would be a bar or hook above it from which a length of chain would be secured and from there the kettle would be suspended above the fire to boil. So with this in mind, if the pocket watch chain, with no weight on it to hold it in the pocket, fell out and dangled minus the missing watch, there would always be some clever Charlie ready to pipe up "What's that for then, your bleedin' kettle?"

Conversation Questions for the ESL/EFL Classroom If this is your first time here, then read the Teacher's Guide to Using These PagesIf you can think of a good question for any list, please send it to us. Home | Articles | Lessons | Techniques | Questions | Games | Jokes | Things for Teachers | Links | Activities for ESL Students Would you like to help? If you can think of a good question for any list, please send it to us. If you would like to suggest another topic, please send it and a set of questions to begin the topic. The Distinctive Vowel Sounds of British and American English Vowels of American English Here the vowels of American English are plotted according to the point of primary obstruction by the tongue in the articulation of the sound. "Low" refers not only to the position of the tongue but the jaw as well. (NB--the symbols are clickable and should return an .au file of the sound.

Engage Now - Student Interactions - teacher heath Do you hear your students say things like: "No! That's Wrong!" "What are you talking about?" "Stop being so bossy!" How To Teach Formal And Informal Language Practical ideas for teaching polite language and friendly language. Although getting formality really right is a sign of a truly advanced learner (and is also the last thing native speaker teenagers pick up), even beginners can gain from being told the formality differences between “Can you…?”/“Could you…?”

Sounds Familiar? What you can hear You can listen to 71 sound recordings and over 600 short audio clips chosen from two collections of the British Library Sound Archive: the Survey of English Dialects and the Millennium Memory Bank. You’ll hear Londoners discussing marriage and working life, Welsh teenagers talking with pride about being bilingual and the Aristocracy chatting about country houses.

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