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21 Accents

21 Accents

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3UgpfSp2t6k

Related:  ListeningPRONUNCIATION

Helping learners understand different accents This post accompanies the workshop Laura gave on 7 November 2015 at the English UK conference in London. You can view the presentation slides here. (And you may also have seen or heard about this workshop earlier this year, at the IATEFL conference in Manchester!) Why help learners understand different accents – and why L2 accents in particular? English is used by millions of people around the world. They do not all sound the same, and very few sound like the recordings featured in popular published ELT materials. Pronunciation Teaching: 11 quick multi-sensory techniques - Evolutions In this post I’d like to start a list/discussion of useful pronunciation teaching techniques. One of my favorite teachers-who-write, over at The Other Things Matter, inspired by another one at The Breathy Vowel, tweeted the following: Then later he mentioned something about cellphones and progress in the pronunciation area. I wonder what progress that was? I was particularly interested in the “comfort zone” hashtag, as every time I’ve had the chance to do a pronunciation workshop with teachers, from any background, invariably the feedback comes in that for any or all of three reasons, the vast majority give pronunciation short shrift: 1.

Dialects of English Southern Southern English engages in r-dropping, that is, r's are not pronounced after vowels, unless followed by another vowel. Instead, vowels are lengthened or have an /'/ off-glide, so fire becomes /fai'/, far becomes /fa:/, and so on. regular use of "broad a" (/a:/), where GA (General American) would use /æ/. "long o" is pronounced /'u/, where GA uses /ou/. final unstressed i is pronounced /i/, where GA uses /i:). t between vowels retained as /t/ (or a glottal stop, in its variants), where GA changes it to /d/.

Taking Humor Seriously Jester or Joker: Cliche Finder Have you been searching for just the right cliché to use? Are you searching for a cliché using the word "cat" or "day" but haven't been able to come up with one? Just enter any words in the form below, and this search engine will return any clichés which use that phrase... Over 3,300 clichés indexed! What exactly is a cliche? The 10 Best Places to Find ELT Listening Materials If, like me, you find that one of the most commonly heard requests from your learners is to provide them with additional listening materials to study with outside of class, this post is definitely for you. I’ve trawled the internet and the result of my extensive labors is the list of ten great resources you see below… enjoy! 1) Link Eng Park This site doesn’t actually produce any of its own materials, but it’s as close as an encyclopedia of all ESL online listening materials as you’re ever likely to find. If you can’t find something here for your teaching context, you almost might as well stop searching!

Feel the beat: how rhythm shapes the way we use and understand language Do you feel the rhythm? Or a French rythme, Spanish ritmo, Swedish rytm, Russian ритм (ritm) or Japanese rizumu? Is there a difference? Perhaps one way to find out is to have a French conversation, German konversation, Spanish conversación, or Italian conversatione?

AccentHelp: Learn Accents and Dialects: British, Irish, American and more Top 20 Quotes of Dorothy Parker Books Dorothy Parker (August 22, 1893 – June 7, 1967) was an American writer and poet, best known for her caustic wit, wisecracks, and sharp eye for 20th century urban foibles. From a conflicted and unhappy childhood, Parker rose to acclaim, both for her literary output in such venues as The New Yorker and as a founding member of the Algonquin Round Table. Her letters, short stories, and articles are all brilliantly witty and I strongly recommend her work!

Sounds Familiar? What you can hear You can listen to 71 sound recordings and over 600 short audio clips chosen from two collections of the British Library Sound Archive: the Survey of English Dialects and the Millennium Memory Bank. You’ll hear Londoners discussing marriage and working life, Welsh teenagers talking with pride about being bilingual and the Aristocracy chatting about country houses. You can explore the links between present-day Geordie and our Anglo-Saxon and Viking past or discover why Northern Irish accents are a rich blend of seventeenth century English and Scots.

How to Teach Old Ears New Tricks “Hi! I'm Gabe. What's your name?” “Seung-heon. 100 Most Often Mispronounced Words and Phrases in English There are spelling rules in English, even if they are difficult to understand, so pronouncing a word correctly usually does help you spell it correctly. Here are the 100 most often mispronounced English words ("mispronunciation" among them). Several common errors are the result of rapid speech, so take your time speaking, correctly enunciating each word.

Mock Listening Paper - Economics Group As part of this course, you will have to give a group presentation on one of the topics we’ve discussed so far. I’ve already decided on the groups – there will be three people in each group. Please check the handout I’ve given you to find out who is in your group. I’m going to give you some time now to meet your group members and start discussing what topic you’d like to work on and do your presentation on. Once you decide, you can come to me and explain your ideas and I’ll give you some feedback. Henry: Hi, are you Joe?

10 Best Free Listening Websites with Quizzes to Practise for Listening Exams So what do you do to practise listening for exams? Growing up, I never had the opportunity to do any extra practice to improve my listening skills. We didn’t have the Internet and the thousand possibilities it offers to learners of any language nowadays.

Related:  Accents & dialectscommunicationEnglish