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How to pronounce correctly

How to pronounce correctly

Listening Listening Lessons Dogs, Dogs, Dogs - Idioms and phrases using the word 'Dog'. Get the phone! ESL Lessons Daily Word Copyright 2009 - 2013 - 5MinuteEnglish.com is an ESL (English as a Second Language) Resource Arnold Zwicky's Blog How to pronounce the - English Pronunciation There are two ways to pronounce "the":- The first and most common one is short, and sounds like "thuh" Weak Weak pronunciation Sounds like "thuh". It rhymes with "duh" and if you say "mother" it rhymes with the "mo" and the "ther". As a general rule, we use the weak pronunciation with words that start with a consonant or words that begin with a vowel. For example: "The cat sat on the mat." Some words begin with a vowel, but are pronounced as if they begin with a consonant. For example: the word 'university' starts with a /j/ sound, which is a consonant. Strong The second is longer and sounds like "thee":- Strong pronunciation Sounds like "thee". It rhymes with pea, fee, me. We use the strong pronunciation with words that start with a vowel or sound as if they do. For example:- "the apple" "the end" "the hour" 'the ice' We also use the strong 'the' when we want to stress the word, regardless of whether it begins with a vowel or a consonant. For example:- "I spoke to Kevin Costner the other day.""

Listen A Minute: Easier English Listening and Activities World Wide Words TOEFL® Listening : free practice exercises from Exam English Academic Listening Skills The Listening section measures test takers’ ability to understand spoken English from North America and other English-speaking countries. In academic environments students need to listen to lectures and conversations. Listening purposes include Listening for basic comprehension Listening for pragmatic understanding Connecting and synthesizing information Listening Section Format Listening materials in the new test include academic lectures and long conversations in which the speech sounds very natural. ETS®, TOEFL®, TOEFL iBT® and TOEFL Junior® are registered trademarks of Educational Testing Service (ETS). 2014 © Exam English Ltd.

Dictation-English > BEST RESOURCES: PLACEMENT TEST | GUIDE | OUR BEST WORKSHEETS | Most popular | Contact us > LESSONS AND TESTS: -ing | AS or LIKE | Abbreviations and acronyms... | Adjectives | Adverbs | Agreement/Disagreement | Alphabet | Animals | Articles | Audio test | Be | BE, HAVE, DO, DID, WAS... | Banks, money | Beginners | Betty's adventures | Bilingual dialogues | Business | Buying in a shop | Capital letters | Cars | Celebrations: Thanksgiving, new year... | Clothes | Colours/Colors | Comparisons | Compound words | Conditional and hypothesis | Conjunctions | Contractions | Countries and nationalities | Dates, days, months, seasons | Dictation | Direct/Indirect speech | Diseases | Exclamative sentences! > ABOUT THIS SITE: Copyright Laurent Camus - Learn more / Help / Contact [Terms of use] [Safety tips] | Do not copy or translate - site protected by an international copyright | Cookies | Legal notices. | Our English lessons and tests are 100% free but visitors must pay for Internet access.

Social Media Glossary For many people, posting a tweet, hashtagging an Instagram caption, and sending out an invite for a Facebook event on Facebook has become common practice. (In fact, if you're highly experienced, you probably do all three at once.) But with new social media networks and innovative software cropping up almost daily, even seasoned social media users are bound to run into a term or acronym that leaves them thinking, "WTF?" Download our free social media guides here to help you get started with an effective social media strategy. For those head-scratching moments, we've created the ultimate glossary of social media marketing terms. Whether you're still hung up on the difference between a mention and a reply on Twitter or you just want to brush up on your social knowledge, check out the following roundup of social media terms to keep yourself in the know. 3) Algorithm - An algorithm is a set of formulas developed for a computer to perform a certain function.

How to fake a British or American Accent English is sometimes a state of confusion for many learners with the large variety of accents, regional slang, and dialects to chose from. Do you speak more American or British or a little bit of both? Which of the major types of English do you find easier to understand, sounds nicer to you, and more difficult to understand? Facts about English: English has a large number of native speakers.About 500 million native speakers and 900 million non-native speakers in the world.Only Mandarin Chinese and Spanish have more native speakers.Below is the order of country with largest total number of English speakers.The number in parentheses is the percentage of English speakers versus other languages in the country. USA (96%)India (12%)Nigeria (53%)UK (98%)Philippines (58%)Canada (85%)Australia (92%) How important is English where you live? Is it difficult for you to practice your English in your area? Of course the United Kingdom is where English comes from and has the widest range of accents. 2. 3.

5 Minute English - ESL Lessons - Helping you learn English Online Etymology Dictionary 100 Exquisite Adjectives By Mark Nichol Adjectives — descriptive words that modify nouns — often come under fire for their cluttering quality, but often it’s quality, not quantity, that is the issue. Plenty of tired adjectives are available to spoil a good sentence, but when you find just the right word for the job, enrichment ensues. Subscribe to Receive our Articles and Exercises via Email You will improve your English in only 5 minutes per day, guaranteed! 21 Responses to “100 Exquisite Adjectives” Rebecca Fantastic list!

English listening practice exercises - Sounds English

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