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The 5 Elements Students Should Look For When Evaluating Web Content

The 5 Elements Students Should Look For When Evaluating Web Content
March , 2014 In a section in her wonderful book "Understanding The Social Lives of Networked Teens" Danah Boyd talked extensively about the concept of digital natives and argued that this nomenclature does not really capture the essence of what a digitally savvy teenager really means. Dana argued that the mere fact of being comfortable with a social media tool does not prove that the user has a digital fluency to allow them to better use it for educational purposes : Just because teens are comfortable using social media to hang out does not mean that they’re fluent in or with technology. Many teens are not nearly as digitally adept as the often-used assumption that they are “digital natives” would suggest. The teens I met knew how to get to Google but had little understanding about how to construct a query to get quality information from the popular search engine. Learning how to evaluate online content is an essential step in the process of developing digitally literate students.

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/04/the-5-elements-students-should-look-for.html

Related:  Evaluation Skills

Evaluating internet information Information comes to us from a wide variety of sources. Can you tell good information from bad? MajesticSEO's Fresh Index estimates that there are almost 700 billion web pages out there and that search engines cover less than 1/4 of that! (what percent of this do you think will be QUALITY, USEFUL information?) Here are some things to remember when you use the Web: It's Fake??? There are four broad categories of fake news, according to media professor Melissa Zimdars of Merrimack College. CATEGORY 1: Fake, false, or regularly misleading websites that are shared on Facebook and social media. Some of these websites may rely on “outrage” by using distorted headlines and decontextualized or dubious information in order to generate likes, shares, and profits.

E.S.C.A.P.E. Junk News GRADE LEVEL: Middle and high school TIME: 30-60 minutes MATERIALS: E.S.C.A.P.E. Junk News poster (download), E.S.C.A.P.E.: Six Key Concepts worksheets (download), a news story for students to evaluate, internet access Digital Credibility: 13 Lessons For the Google Generation - 13 Digital Research Tools And The Credibility Lessons They Teach by TeachThought Staff This post is promoted by Noet, makers of Encyclopedia Britannica Noet Edition and the free research app for the classics, who asked us to talk about the credibility of information research in a digital world. We thought, then, that it might make sense to focus on digital tools and resources that highlight the idea of credibility. And because credibility and research are such important digital concepts–or really, data and thinking concepts, actually–we itemized each tool as lesson in and of itself. The Google Generation has a universe of information, right there on a little pinch-and-zoom screen.

Keep it REAL–4 Easy Steps to Determine Source Credibility The problem: Not all sources are created equal. The solution: Keep it REAL–4 Easy Steps to credible & authentic source material. When it comes time to do research, most of us (not *just our students), reach for our phones and just “Google it.” Yet, when it comes time to incorporate source content into their writing, we want students to go beyond that one easy step. Our students have an enormous amount of information at their fingertips.

Is This Story Share-Worthy? Flowchart - NewseumED GRADE LEVEL: Middle and high school TIME: 30-60 minutes MATERIALS: Is This Story Share-Worthy? flowchart, either printed on large paper or available to view on a screen(s) (download); Is This Story Share-Worthy? worksheet, one per group (download); news stories for students to evaluate (at least one per group); internet access Review the Is This Story Share-Worthy? Teaher's Guide to Information Crap Detection Information overload, information crap,information pollution...are some of the words that are being used now to describe the tsunami of irrelevant information we are bombarded with day and night.In December 2009, Google began customizing its search results for all users, and we entered a new era of personalization. With little notice or fanfare, our online experience is changing, as the websites we visit are increasingly tailoring themselves to us.Everywhere you turn you find information that seems relevant to you but in fact is nothing but crap. This is probably why Eli Pariser recommended what he called Information Bubble.

Checklist for Evaluating Web Resources Is the Web a good research tool? This question is dependent on the researcher's objective. As in traditional print resources one must use a method of critical analysis to determine its value. Comparing & Evaluating Web Information Sources From Now On The Educational Technology Journal Vol 6|No 9|June|1997 Comparing & Evaluating Web Information Sources A major challenge in a time of Info-Glut and Info-Garbage is evaluation of information sources.Before basing a decision on the information available, wise researchers (and students) will give thought to the following criteria:

Evaluating Web Pages: Techniques to Apply & Questions to Ask 1. What can the URL tell you? Techniques for Web Evaluation : 1. Before you leave the list of search results -- before you click and get interested in anything written on the page -- glean all you can from the URLs of each page.

Reading Like A Historian The Reading Like a Historian curriculum engages students in historical inquiry. Each lesson revolves around a central historical question and features sets of primary documents designed for groups of students with diverse reading skills and abilities. This curriculum teaches students how to investigate historical questions by employing reading strategies such as sourcing, contextualizing, corroborating, and close reading.

SearchReSearch: Answer: Fake or real? How do you know? 1. Is this a faked photo? If so, how can you tell? (Be specific.) The obvious thing in the picture is the jet fighter in the upper left. (Let's not start to wonder whether or not all of the buildings in the scene are actually just as they are...

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