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The 5 Elements Students Should Look For When Evaluating Web Content

The 5 Elements Students Should Look For When Evaluating Web Content
March , 2014 In a section in her wonderful book "Understanding The Social Lives of Networked Teens" Danah Boyd talked extensively about the concept of digital natives and argued that this nomenclature does not really capture the essence of what a digitally savvy teenager really means. Dana argued that the mere fact of being comfortable with a social media tool does not prove that the user has a digital fluency to allow them to better use it for educational purposes : Just because teens are comfortable using social media to hang out does not mean that they’re fluent in or with technology. Many teens are not nearly as digitally adept as the often-used assumption that they are “digital natives” would suggest. Learning how to evaluate online content is an essential step in the process of developing digitally literate students. Watch this short introduction to CRAAP Currency: Is the information too old. Related:  Evaluation Skills

Evaluating internet information | University Libraries | Virginia Tech Information comes to us from a wide variety of sources. Can you tell good information from bad? MajesticSEO's Fresh Index estimates that there are almost 700 billion web pages out there and that search engines cover less than 1/4 of that! (what percent of this do you think will be QUALITY, USEFUL information?) Here are some things to remember when you use the Web: ANYONE can publish on the Web! We offer you the following information for use when looking for quality information on the Web. Credits: modified with permission from Susan Beck, The Good, The Bad & The Ugly: or, Why It's a Good Idea to Evaluate Web Sources Evaluation Criteria

Digital Credibility: 13 Lessons For the Google Generation - 13 Digital Research Tools And The Credibility Lessons They Teach by TeachThought Staff This post is promoted by Noet, makers of Encyclopedia Britannica Noet Edition and the free research app for the classics, who asked us to talk about the credibility of information research in a digital world. We thought, then, that it might make sense to focus on digital tools and resources that highlight the idea of credibility. And because credibility and research are such important digital concepts–or really, data and thinking concepts, actually–we itemized each tool as lesson in and of itself. The Google Generation has a universe of information, right there on a little pinch-and-zoom screen. Further, “by ignoring the phases of inquiry learning, premature Googlers often find what they want rather than what they might need. This doesn’t make digital research better or worse, but rather different. Lesson 1: Not all sources are created equal. Lesson 2: Access matters–so improve it.

Checklist for Evaluating Web Resources | USM Libraries | University of Southern Maine Is the Web a good research tool? This question is dependent on the researcher's objective. As in traditional print resources one must use a method of critical analysis to determine its value. Authority: Is the information reliable? Check the author's credentials and affiliation. Does the resource have a reputable organization or expert behind it? Are the sources of information stated? Can the author be contacted for clarification? Check for organizational or author biases. Scope: Is the material at this site useful, unique, accurate or is it derivative, repetitious, or doubtful? Is the information available in other formats? Is the purpose of the resource clearly stated? What items are included in the resource? Is the information factual or opinion? Does the site contain original information or simply links? How frequently is the resource updated? Does the site have clear and obvious pointers to new content? Format and Presentation: Is the information easy to get to? Cost and Accessibility:

Research and Citation If you are having trouble locating a specific resource please visit the search page or the Site Map. Conducting Research These OWL resources will help you conduct research using primary source methods, such as interviews and observations, and secondary source methods, such as books, journals, and the Internet. This area also includes materials on evaluating research sources. Using Research These OWL resources will help you use the research you have conducted in your documents. APA Style These OWL resources will help you learn how to use the American Psychological Association (APA) citation and format style. MLA Style These OWL resources will help you learn how to use the Modern Language Association (MLA) citation and format style. Chicago Manual of Style This section contains information on the Chicago Manual of Style method of document formatting and citation. American Medical Association (AMA) Style

50 Activities To Promote Digital Media Literacy In Students Literacy is changing–not at its core necessarily, but certainly at its edges as it expands to include new kinds of “reading.” Digital media is quickly replacing traditional media forms as those most accessible to most 21st century learners. The impact of this change is extraordinarily broad, but for now we’ll narrow it down to changes in how learners respond to the media they consume. The most fundamental pattern of formal academia is to read something and then write about it. Sometimes this writing comes in the form of responding to questions, while other time it’s in the form of an essay. And sometimes the reading is watching, playing with, or otherwise interacting with a digital media. Some of these tasks will look familiar, especially to English teachers. You also might notice that many of them apply to both traditional and digital media. I’ll be updating this list, revising it to add better examples, alter clunky phrasing, and so on. Image attribution flickr user flickeringbrad

Teaher's Guide to Information Crap Detection Information overload, information crap,information pollution...are some of the words that are being used now to describe the tsunami of irrelevant information we are bombarded with day and night.In December 2009, Google began customizing its search results for all users, and we entered a new era of personalization. With little notice or fanfare, our online experience is changing, as the websites we visit are increasingly tailoring themselves to us.Everywhere you turn you find information that seems relevant to you but in fact is nothing but crap. This is probably why Eli Pariser recommended what he called Information Bubble. Howard Rheingold is another guy who has done a lot of writings on Information Crap. in an article posted last year. The first thing we all need to know about information online is how to detect crap, a technical term I use for information tainted by ignorance, inept communication, or deliberate deception. 4- Crap Test 5- Video

What Is Plagiarism? Please Don't Plagiarize! Show transcriptHide transcript Did you know that copying text from the Internet and posting it somewhere new without saying where you got it is a form of cheating? It's also called stealing. You also steal when you take an image that you find on the Internet and use it without permission. This kind of cheating and stealing is also known as plagiarism. And How To Avoid It - A Guide For ESL Learners Do you plagiarize? Plagiarism is an illegal form of copying. Examples of plagiarism Why do English learners copy? Here are some common excuses English learners use: "I didn't know how to put it in my own words."" There are two main reasons why plagiarism is taken so seriously in the academic world: Authors and artists work very hard to create original work. International Plagiarism Most countries have copyright laws. In some countries, the idea of "intellectual property" is not valued. There is NO excuse for international students to plagiarize in a foreign country, however.

Wonderopolis | Where the Wonders of Learning Never Cease Constructivism in learning Constructivism is the label given to a set of theories about learning which fall somewhere between cognitive and humanistic views. If behaviourism treats the organism as a black box, cognitive theory recognises the importance of the mind in making sense of the material with which it is presented. Nevertheless, it still presupposes that the role of the learner is primarily to assimilate whatever the teacher presents. Constructivism — particularly in its "social" forms — suggests that the learner is much more actively involved in a joint enterprise with the teacher of creating ("constructing") new meanings. We can distinguish between "cognitive constructivism" which is about how the individual learner understands things, in terms of developmental stages and learning styles, and "social constructivism", which emphasises how meanings and understandings grow out of social encounters—see Vygotsky below. In this sense, conversational theories of learning fit into the constructivist framework.

Education Week Published Online: December 2, 2015 San Francisco Google is being accused of invading the privacy of students using laptop computers powered by the Internet company's Chrome operating system. The Electronic Frontier Foundation, a digital rights group, depicts Google as a two-faced opportunist in a complaint filed Tuesday with the Federal Trade Commission. Google disputes the unflattering portrait and says it isn't doing anything wrong. The complaint alleges that Google rigged the "Chromebook" computers in a way that enables the company to collect information about students' Internet search requests and online video habits. The complaint contends Google's storage and analysis of the student profile violates a "Student Privacy Pledge" that the company signed last year. The foundation is calling on the FTC to investigate Google, stop it from using information on students' activities for its own purposes and order it to destroy any information it has collected that's not related to education.

Comparing & Evaluating Web Information Sources From Now On The Educational Technology Journal Vol 6|No 9|June|1997 Comparing & Evaluating Web Information Sources A major challenge in a time of Info-Glut and Info-Garbage is evaluation of information sources.Before basing a decision on the information available, wise researchers (and students) will give thought to the following criteria: reliability - definition | accuracy - definition | authority - definition currency - definition fairness - definition adequacy - definition efficiency - definition | organization - definition Staff and students need to learn to apply these concepts critically to the sites they are visiting so they become thoughtful and discerning information consumers. Using a table as a "visual organizer" often helps focus the evaluation of sources. **** Excellent *** Good ** Satisfactory * Weak References For additional information and resources to support the development of Web site evaluation skills, visit the following sites:

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