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Reading Like A Historian The Reading Like a Historian curriculum engages students in historical inquiry. Each lesson revolves around a central historical question and features sets of primary documents designed for groups of students with diverse reading skills and abilities. This curriculum teaches students how to investigate historical questions by employing reading strategies such as sourcing, contextualizing, corroborating, and close reading. Instead of memorizing historical facts, students evaluate the trustworthiness of multiple perspectives on historical issues. They learn to make historical claims backed by documentary evidence.

How to read and understand a scientific paper: a guide for non-scientists From vaccinations to climate change, getting science wrong has very real consequences. But journal articles, a primary way science is communicated in academia, are a different format to newspaper articles or blogs and require a level of skill and undoubtedly a greater amount of patience. Here Jennifer Raff has prepared a helpful guide for non-scientists on how to read a scientific paper. These steps and tips will be useful to anyone interested in the presentation of scientific findings and raise important points for scientists to consider with their own writing practice.

SearchReSearch: Answer: Fake or real? How do you know? 1. Is this a faked photo? If so, how can you tell? (Be specific.) Five Strategies to Help Students Conduct Better Informational Searches Google is great for navigational and transactional searches. If you need to find your way to the movie theater or find the best price for a vacuum cleaner, Google handles those requests quite well. Searches for more meaningful information aren't always handled well by Google. For example, see the some of the nonsense "suggested" search terms that sometimes appear with your search. SearchReSearch: Search Challenge (11/11/15): Fake or real? How do you know? Unfortunately... ... people have been faking stories, photos, and claims for as long as humans have been around. Of course now we're aided by technology, which sometimes makes these deceptions a bit more difficult to ferret out. Here's an early famously faked photograph: This is one of the images of the Cottingley Fairies. In 1920, a series of photos, supposedly taken by two young girls while playing in the garden, claimed to show that fairies really did exist.

Community of Online Research Assignments Short Description: This assignment is designed to help students develop a thoughtful research topic. Students go through a series of steps, questions, and background reading to help them better understand and refine a research topic. Course Context (e.g. how it was implemented or integrated): This exercise is due week 3, usually before library instruction. How Photos Fuel the Spread of Fake News During a campaign stop in South Carolina last winter, Hillary Clinton stumbled as she climbed the steps of an antebellum mansion in Charleston. Aides helped her regain her balance in a vulnerable but nondescript moment captured by Getty photographer Mark Makela. He didn’t think much of it until August, when the alt-right news site Breitbart touted it as evidence of Clinton’s failing health. “It was really bizarre and dispiriting to see,” he says. “We’re always attuned to photographic manipulation, but what was more sinister in this situation was the misappropriation of a photo.” Misappropriation and misrepresentation of images helped drive the growth of fake news.

Summarizing different perspectives on a controversial topic Short Description: Using ProQuest SIRS Issues Researcher or similar database, groups of students work together to find and read four informative magazine articles representing a variety of opinions on a topic. For each magazine article they write an MLA citation. In an oral presentation of less than three minutes per group, they summarize the controversy without giving their own opinions and explain why they chose the four articles. Students are told to be prepared to answer questions about their topic and why they selected each of the four articles. 10 Hilarious Hoax Sites to Test Website Evaluation – TeachBytes In this day and age, where anyone with access to the internet can create a website, it is critical that we as educators teach our students how to evaluate web content. There are some great resources available for educating students on this matter, such as Kathy Schrock’s Five W’s of Website Evaluation or the University of Southern Maine’s Checklist for Evaluating Websites. Along with checklists and articles, you will also find wonderfully funny hoax websites, aimed at testing readers on their ability to evaluate websites. These hoax sites are a great way to bring humor and hands-on evaluation into your classroom, and test your students’ web resource evaluation IQ! Check out these 11 example hoax sites for use in your own classrooms:

Here Is A Great Educational Tool for Digital Curation March , 2016 Candy is a cool Chrome extension that allows you to capture ideas and thoughts from any web page and use them in your writing projects. You simply highlight the sentences or portion of text you are interested in and Candy saves and displays it in a card together with the author and the source information. You can embed these cards in your documents (online and offline), share them via email or on popular social media networks such as Twitter and Facebook or embed them in your blog or website the same way you embed a YouTube video. Candy can be of great help to students. They can use it to insert quotations from any webpage right into the document they are working on. It can also be used to generate reference information to data in a document.

10 Ways to Spot a Fake News Article - EasyBib Blog For many of us, 2016 is going down as a year to forget. Election upsets, Zika, the Syrian crisis, and unfortunately tons of fake news about all of the above and everything in between. Denzel Washington was recently quoted as saying, “If you don’t read the newspaper, you’re uninformed. If you do read the newspaper, you’re misinformed.” So what should you do? You want to be informed, but a good deal of the information out there is incorrect or biased.

7 Ways Students Use Diigo To Do Research and Collaborative Project Work January 14, 2015 Diigo is an excellent social bookmarking tool that enable you to save, annotate, and share bookmarks. The power of Diigo lies in the distinctive features that it offers to teachers and educators. There is a special account for K-12 and higher-ed educators that empower registered teachers with a variety of tools and features.

Evaluating Websites - AndySpinks.com C.A.R.S. Checklist for Evaluating Internet Sources You should evaluate every website you use for research or for personal information. Ask yourself the following questions about each site and try to use only those that have the best evidence of credibility, accuracy, reasonableness, and support. quick_start_guide [Zotero Documentation] Translations of this page: Zotero [zoh-TAIR-oh] is a free, easy-to-use tool to help you collect, organize, cite, and share your research sources. Read on for an overview of Zotero's features and capabilities.

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