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"APA Documentation" UW-Madison Writing Center Writer's Handbook

"APA Documentation" UW-Madison Writing Center Writer's Handbook
What is a review of literature? The format of a review of literature may vary from discipline to discipline and from assignment to assignment. A review may be a self-contained unit -- an end in itself -- or a preface to and rationale for engaging in primary research. A review is a required part of grant and research proposals and often a chapter in theses and dissertations. Generally, the purpose of a review is to analyze critically a segment of a published body of knowledge through summary, classification, and comparison of prior research studies, reviews of literature, and theoretical articles. Writing the introduction In the introduction, you should: Define or identify the general topic, issue, or area of concern, thus providing an appropriate context for reviewing the literature. top Writing the body In the body, you should: Writing the conclusion In the conclusion, you should:

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APA Formatting and Style Guide Summary: APA (American Psychological Association) style is most commonly used to cite sources within the social sciences. This resource, revised according to the 6th edition, second printing of the APA manual, offers examples for the general format of APA research papers, in-text citations, endnotes/footnotes, and the reference page. For more information, please consult the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, (6th ed., 2nd printing).

Tips for Reading Scientific Research Reports Not all science or research is created equal. Some research is likely to hold more weight than other research. Researchers and academics often recognize quality research readily, while others — even other professionals such as doctors and clinicians — may struggle with understanding the value of any given journal article. How to... write a literature review Part: 1 Some definitions A literature review is a description of the literature relevant to a particular field or topic. It gives an overview of what has been said, who the key writers are, what are the prevailing theories and hypotheses, what questions are being asked, and what methods and methodologies are appropriate and useful. As such, it is not in itself primary research, but rather it reports on other findings. Here is one definition of a literature review: "... a literature review uses as its database reports of primary or original scholarship, and does not report new primary scholarship itself.

Annotated Bibliographies Summary: This handout provides information about annotated bibliographies in MLA, APA, and CMS. Contributors:Geoff Stacks, Erin Karper, Dana Bisignani, Allen BrizeeLast Edited: 2013-03-10 11:25:28 Definitions 25 Powerpoint presentations you won’t hate When I was younger and I had to make Powerpoint presentations, I never really liked to do them. I couldn’t figure out why other than they just didn’t do what I wanted them to do. They were often unappealing, tacky and most were just eyesores. What is a Literature Review? Many students are instructed, as part of their research program, to perform a literature review, without always understanding what a literature review is. Most are aware that it is a process of gathering information from other sources and documenting it, but few have any idea of how to evaluate the information, or how to present it. A literature review can be a precursor in the introduction of a research paper, or it can be an entire paper in itself, often the first stage of large research projects, allowing the supervisor to ascertain that the student is on the correct path.

Writing Workshops for Graduate Students Summary: The resources available in this section provide the user with the materials that they would need to hold a writing workshop for graduate students. While these resources do not target a particular kind of writing (e.g., writing for courses, writing for publication, or writing thesis and dissertations), it does provide the needed structure act as a sort of graduate student writing workshop-in-a-box. Contributors:Gracemarie MikeLast Edited: 2014-06-10 09:07:11 About This Handout The literature review, whether embedded in an introduction or standing as an independent section, is often one of the most difficult sections to compose in academic writing.

Top 20 Best PowerPoint Presentations Looking for the best PowerPoint presentations to inspire you? We searched high and low to provide you with an out of this world list of the best PowerPoint presentation designs. Presentations don’t only have to be used the day of your pitch. Now with sites like SlideShare, presentations are a great medium for creating unique content. From Slideshares to Ted Talks, here’s a top 20 list of the best PowerPoint presentation designs. …And feel free to laugh at the irony of us using bullet points while we applaud presenters for not using them! The Literature Review: A Few Tips On Conducting It Printable PDF Version Fair-Use Policy What is a review of the literature? A literature review is an account of what has been published on a topic by accredited scholars and researchers. Occasionally you will be asked to write one as a separate assignment (sometimes in the form of an annotated bibliography—see the bottom of the next page), but more often it is part of the introduction to an essay, research report, or thesis. In writing the literature review, your purpose is to convey to your reader what knowledge and ideas have been established on a topic, and what their strengths and weaknesses are. As a piece of writing, the literature review must be defined by a guiding concept (e.g., your research objective, the problem or issue you are discussing, or your argumentative thesis).

Library & information Access What is a scholarly journal | Comparing journals & magazines | Finding peer-reviewed journals What is a scholarly journal? Your instructor has asked you to find an article in a scholarly (or professional or refereed or peer-reviewed) journal. Scholarly journals differ from popular magazines and trade journals/magazines in a number of ways. 8 Best PowerPoint Presentations: How To Create Engaging Presentations If you subscribe to news feeds or have friends who love to share information found online, you’ve likely seen some fresh, thought-provoking PowerPoint presentations. While some are traditional, and others are trend-setting, they share a common factor that makes them great – the ability to convey a message to make a powerful “point” quickly, concisely, and memorably. In a nutshell, a great presentation sells a concept, doing so in a way that grips and holds your attention. The rise of slides as an extremely effective internet communication medium has not gone unrecognized by groups such as Microsoft and PowerPoint and hosting company SlideShare, who award honors each year to standouts.

Critically Analyzing Information Sources A. Author What are the author's credentials--institutional affiliation (where he or she works), educational background, past writings, or experience? Is the book or article written on a topic in the author's area of expertise? You can use the various Who's Who publications for the U.S. and other countries and for specific subjects and the biographical information located in the publication itself to help determine the author's affiliation and credentials.Has your instructor mentioned this author? Tips for writing your first scientific literature review article The finished product There were many points at which I felt overwhelmed by the task and didn’t see a clear path to finishing the article on time. I tried to reassure myself by remembering that I had been rather good at writing term papers in college; but this was a larger task and one with the potential for having an impact on someone, somewhere, sometime who wanted to learn about caspase substrates.

Microsoft's wants ET presentation, PowerPoint I found this recently and thought it was an interesting use of data: From Bnet.com: Why Schering-Plough's Nasonex Bee Is to Blame for FDA's New Drug Ad Rules By Jim Edwards | May 27th, 2009 @ 8:53 am The FDA's new proposed guidelines on drug advertising read like a full-employment act for medical copywriters and graphic designers: they control font size, white space, context, contrast, placement, background and the use of sections in ads. Overall, they require companies to produce materials that are more comprehensible to the "reasonable consumer;" that are more overt about risks; and warn that the FDA will judge them by their "net impression" "as a whole," not simply whether they are technically accurate. One person who will smile when reading the new guidelines is Ruth Day of Duke University.

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