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Checklist for Evaluating Web Resources

Checklist for Evaluating Web Resources
Is the Web a good research tool? This question is dependent on the researcher's objective. As in traditional print resources one must use a method of critical analysis to determine its value. Here is a checklist for evaluating web resources to help in that determination. Authority: Is the information reliable? Check the author's credentials and affiliation. Does the resource have a reputable organization or expert behind it? Are the sources of information stated? Can the author be contacted for clarification? Check for organizational or author biases. Scope: Is the material at this site useful, unique, accurate or is it derivative, repetitious, or doubtful? Is the information available in other formats? Is the purpose of the resource clearly stated? What items are included in the resource? Is the information factual or opinion? Does the site contain original information or simply links? How frequently is the resource updated? Does the site have clear and obvious pointers to new content? Other Tips: Related:  Evaluation Skillssamaradese

Comparing & Evaluating Web Information Sources From Now On The Educational Technology Journal Vol 6|No 9|June|1997 Comparing & Evaluating Web Information Sources A major challenge in a time of Info-Glut and Info-Garbage is evaluation of information sources.Before basing a decision on the information available, wise researchers (and students) will give thought to the following criteria: reliability - definition | accuracy - definition | authority - definition currency - definition fairness - definition adequacy - definition efficiency - definition | organization - definition Staff and students need to learn to apply these concepts critically to the sites they are visiting so they become thoughtful and discerning information consumers. Using a table as a "visual organizer" often helps focus the evaluation of sources. **** Excellent *** Good ** Satisfactory * Weak References For additional information and resources to support the development of Web site evaluation skills, visit the following sites:

Digital Citizenship Critically Analyzing Information Sources | olinuris.library.cornell.edu A. Author What are the author's credentials--institutional affiliation (where he or she works), educational background, past writings, or experience? B. When was the source published? C. Is this a first edition of this publication or not? D. Note the publisher. E. Is this a scholarly or a popular journal? American Libraries : Free Books : Free Texts : Download & Streaming collection eye Named after General Anthony Wayne and incorporated in 1840, the City of Fort Wayne is Indiana's second largest city with a population of more than 250,000. It is located in the northeast corner of the state at the confluence of the St. College year books including The Poly, The Prickly Pear, and The Yellowstone for Rocky Mountain College and its predecessor schools. Books contributed by the Mount Wachusett Community College, LaChance Library Anabaptist and Mennonite digital library materials This collection includes historical Georgia codes beginning with the 1799 Watkins Digest of Statutes through the 1933 code. The historical collections of Piedmont College Libraries are housed at the Arrendale Library on our main campus at Demorest, Georgia, in the College Archives. A collection of yearbooks from College of the Albemarle. From the Rush Medical College Records, #4707, Rush University Medical Center Archives, Chicago, Ill. Books contributed by Lincoln Public Library . texts

Shawn McCusker Evaluating Web Pages: Techniques to Apply & Questions to Ask 1. What can the URL tell you? Techniques for Web Evaluation : 1. 2. 2. 1. INSTRUCTIONS for Truncating back a URL: In the top Location Box, delete the end characters of the URL stopping just before each / (leave the slash). Continue this process, one slash (/) at a time, until you reach the first single / which is preceded by the domain name portion. 3. Check the date on all the pages on the site. 3. 1. What kinds of publications or sites are they? Are they real? 3. Expect a journal article, newspaper article, and some other publications that are recent to come from the original publisher IF the publication is available on the web. Look at the bottom of such articles for copyright information or permissions to reproduce. 4. 1. a. Type or paste the URL into alexa.com's search box. b. 1. The pages listed all contain one or more links to the page you are looking for. If you find no links, try a shorter portion of the URL, stopping after each /. 2. 5. 1. 2. WHY? More About Evaluating Web Sources

Digital Citizenship - Main Page Evaluating internet information | University Libraries | Virginia Tech Information comes to us from a wide variety of sources. Can you tell good information from bad? MajesticSEO's Fresh Index estimates that there are almost 700 billion web pages out there and that search engines cover less than 1/4 of that! (what percent of this do you think will be QUALITY, USEFUL information?) Here are some things to remember when you use the Web: ANYONE can publish on the Web! We offer you the following information for use when looking for quality information on the Web. Credits: modified with permission from Susan Beck, The Good, The Bad & The Ugly: or, Why It's a Good Idea to Evaluate Web Sources Evaluation Criteria

Home - Evaluating resources - Library Guides at UC Berkeley To find out more about an author: Google the author's name or dig deeper in the library's biographical source databases. To find scholarly sources: When searching library article databases, look for a checkbox to narrow your results to Scholarly, Peer Reviewed or Peer Refereed publications. To evaluate a source's critical reception: Check in the library's book and film review databases to get a sense of how a source was received in the popular and scholarly press. To evaluate internet sources: The internet is a great place to find both scholarly and popular sources, but it's especially important to ask questions about authorship and publication when you're evaluating online resources. Navigating the Complexities of Online Information EdTechTeacher Privacy & Event Policies Summer Workshop Materials by EdTechTeacher is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Sign in|Recent Site Activity|Report Abuse|Print Page|Powered By Google Sites

model lesson 1 ready-to-go mini lesson LESSON 1 "Think Aloud" Demonstration Time: 10-15 minutes as follows: 5 minutes think aloud 5 minutes search as individuals 5 minutes collect findings Materials: computers, one with a projector whiteboard or Red Flag Chart It may be helpful to create a Red Flag Chart with three columns: Accused | Suspicious | Acquited (or similar terms). Think Aloud This lesson takes place in the context of a science course where DNA, genetics and "designer babies" is the topic. Among results for "designer babies" is this Genochoice.com Use this site to demonstrate how an investigative searcher might approach the material. Click this and point out information about the credits: Virgil Wong. Start a list of things you find out about Virgil Wong. After five minutes, call an end to searching and begin to collect information from the students. Among the findings possible, he is: Back to Model Lessons

Archived: Effects of Technology on Classrooms and Students A r c h i v e d I n f o r m a t i o n Change inStudent andTeacherRoles When students are using technology as a tool or a support for communicating with others, they are in an active role rather than the passive role of recipient of information transmitted by a teacher, textbook, or broadcast. The student is actively making choices about how to generate, obtain, manipulate, or display information. The teacher's role changes as well. Project-based work (such as the City Building Project and the Student-Run Manufacturing Company) and cooperative learning approaches prompt this change in roles, whether technology is used or not. IncreasedMotivation andSelfEsteem The most common--and in fact, nearly universal--teacher-reported effect on students was an increase in motivation. The kids that don't necessarily star can become the stars. Teachers talked about motivation from a number of different perspectives. Kids like the immediate results. Technology is the ultimate carrot for students.

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