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Learning Standards & Common Core State Standards Crosswalk

Skip to main content ALA User Menu Search form A Division of the American Library Association You are at: ALA.org » AASL » Learning Standards & Program Guidelines » Learning Standards & Common Core State Standards Crosswalk Share this page: Share on Facebook Share on Google+ Share on Pinterest Print Learning Standards & Common Core State Standards Crosswalk The following pages include tables that help school librarians learn how the AASL Standards for the 21st-Century Learner and the Common Core State Standards align. English Language Arts Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, & Technical Subjects Mathematics Lessons submitted as part of the Standards for the 21st-Century Learner Lesson Plan Database contain an automatic crosswalk between AASL learning standards and the Common Core State Standards. © 1996–2015 American Library Association

http://www.ala.org/aasl/standards-guidelines/crosswalk

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Results on ReadWriteThink Find content from Thinkfinity Partners using a visual bookmarking and sharing tool. More Your students can save their work with Student Interactives. More Home › Results from ReadWriteThink Position Statement on Flexible Scheduling The library program is fully integrated into the educational program so that students, teachers, and school librarians become partners in learning. This integration strengthens the teaching for learning process to insure students are active learners who guide and continually assess their learning process. Open access to a quality school library program is essential for students to develop the vital skills necessary to analyze, evaluate, interpret, and communicate information and ideas in a variety of formats. Inquiry skills are taught and learned within the context of the curriculum and may occur in the classroom, the library, or at home with 24/7 accessibility to a wide range of resources, technologies, and services. The integrated library program philosophy requires an open schedule that includes flexible and equitable access to physical and virtual collections for staff and students.

Chromebook Tips Every Teacher Should Know Cards on the table, we love Chromebooks. They’re a fast, relatively low-cost portal to powerful learning opportunities. And that’s what we want out of classroom technology: something to push learning beyond current limitations. We collected some next-level tips every Chromebook-using instructor should know:

Learning Standards & Program Guidelines Review and Revision For the first time in decades AASL will be using a multi-layered survey, data, and research approach to revise and rewrite its learning standards and program guidelines for your profession. To ensure the standards meet the needs of the entire community it is critical that we hear from you! Visit the FAQ section for more information on how you can get involved. Overview | Project Plan Milestones | Frequently Asked Questions Position Statement on the School Librarian's Role in Reading Rationale: Reading is a foundational skill for 21st-century learners. Guiding learners to become engaged and effective users of ideas and information and to appreciate literature requires that they develop as strategic readers who can comprehend, analyze, and evaluate text in both print and digital formats. Learners must also have opportunities to read for enjoyment as well as for information. School librarians are in a critical and unique position to partner with other educators to elevate the reading development of our nation’s youth. Reading skills involve thinking skills. The extent to which young people use information depends upon their ability to understand what they read, to integrate their understandings with what they already know, and to realize their unanswered questions.

The NCTE Definition of 21st Century Literacies Updated February 2013Adopted by the NCTE Executive Committee, February 15, 2008 Literacy has always been a collection of cultural and communicative practices shared among members of particular groups. As society and technology change, so does literacy. Because technology has increased the intensity and complexity of literate environments, the 21st century demands that a literate person possess a wide range of abilities and competencies, many literacies. These literacies are multiple, dynamic, and malleable.

Goodreads Blog The Top 100 Young Adult Books of All Time Posted by Jade on September 10, 2015 It's September and to get you in the book-loving, back-to-school mood, we've gone through thousands of Young Adult books to come up with this list of the Top 100 YA Books of all time. These aren't books that your teachers told you to read. (Though there are a few of those in here, too!)

How to Teach Students to Evaluate the Quality of Online Information The volume of information available on the Internet is astounding, and it just keeps growing. Business intelligence company DOMO estimates that 571 new websites are created every minute. With that amount of information, it can be difficult for students to separate the gems from the garbage, but, fortunately, we can help them navigate online information easily and efficiently. What Students Currently Think of Online Information Image via Flickr by USACE Europe District

Flipping the Library: Tips from Three Pros Through the use of innovative technologies and online resources, school libraries can now be available to students wherever—and whenever—they need them. “Flipped” or blended learning offers students the power of personalized instruction, through a mix of virtual and face-to-face interactions, at a student’s own pace. Embracing this concept is a must for student engagement and the future of the profession, say school librarians Joyce Valenza, Brenda Boyer, and Michelle Luhtala.

Study: Good School Libraries Affect Test Scores Columbia, SC (WLTX) - A study released Tuesday by the South Carolina Association of School Librarians shows that the more emphasis is put on school libraries--and the learning that takes place there--the better scores students receive on standardized tests. University of South Carolina Professor Dr. Karen Gavigan outlined the studies five areas of importance at a press conference Tuesday morning. Reading in the Middle Grades - Reading Comprehension Reading comprehensively is the process in which readers read a text and understand what they have read. They are able to grasp the main point of the text and evaluate what work. Comprehensive reading is imperative for students making their way through the middle grades, high school, college, and eventually the adult world. Too often students are only learning to read for information; they are unable to analyze and think complexly about what they have read. Thus, reading comprehension encourages proficiency both for the reader's experience and their work. [1] What is Read:

Personalize Learning with 175 Free Apps #GAETC15 175+ Apps to Personalize Learning Applications (apps) are everywhere, whether for a cellphone, tablet, or other device. I’ve compiled this list of over 175 free apps for education arranged by category. I personally use many of these apps in my classroom. This list includes web, iOS, and Android apps and a few extensions and add-ons too. A brief description of what each app can do is provided for most of the apps. A Project-Based Learning Cheat Sheet For Authentic Learning A Project-Based Learning Cheat Sheet by TeachThought Staff Like most buzzwords in education, “authenticity” isn’t a new idea. For decades, teachers have sought to make student learning “authentic” by looking to the “real world”–the challenges, technology, and communities that students care about and connect with daily. You’ve probably been encouraged in the past to design work that “leaves the classroom.”

The School Library Media Specialist: Overview The teacher librarian must be prepared for a wide variety of leadership roles in the learning community. These multifaceted roles require a thirst for knowledge and a commitment to on-going professional development. The library media specialist has many roles and responsibilities including teacher, instructional partner, information specialist, and program administrator (Information Power, p. 4-5). Teacher. The teacher librarian must be an effective educator and curricular leader.

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