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Learning Standards & Program Guidelines

Learning Standards & Program Guidelines
Review and Revision For the first time in decades AASL will be using a multi-layered survey, data, and research approach to revise and rewrite its learning standards and program guidelines for your profession. To ensure the standards meet the needs of the entire community it is critical that we hear from you! Visit the FAQ section for more information on how you can get involved. Overview | Project Plan Milestones | Frequently Asked Questions While the launch of new standards and guidelines is scheduled for fall 2017, the current AASL standards will not “go away” with the release of new standards. Learning Standards AASL's learning standards offer a vision for teaching and learning to both guide and beckon the school library profession as education leaders. Program Guidelines AASL's newest set of program guidelines defines the future direction of school library programs. Learning4Life Related:  melaniebktraining materialLesson Planning

Learning Standards & Common Core State Standards Crosswalk Skip to main content ALA User Menu Search form A Division of the American Library Association You are at: ALA.org » AASL » Learning Standards & Program Guidelines » Learning Standards & Common Core State Standards Crosswalk Share this page: Share on Facebook Share on Google+ Share on Pinterest Print Learning Standards & Common Core State Standards Crosswalk The following pages include tables that help school librarians learn how the AASL Standards for the 21st-Century Learner and the Common Core State Standards align. English Language Arts Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, & Technical Subjects Mathematics Lessons submitted as part of the Standards for the 21st-Century Learner Lesson Plan Database contain an automatic crosswalk between AASL learning standards and the Common Core State Standards. © 1996–2015 American Library Association

Position Statement on Flexible Scheduling The library program is fully integrated into the educational program so that students, teachers, and school librarians become partners in learning. This integration strengthens the teaching for learning process to ensure students are active learners who guide and continually assess their learning process. Open access to a quality school library program is essential for students to develop the vital skills necessary to analyze, evaluate, interpret, and communicate information and ideas in a variety of formats. Inquiry skills are taught and learned within the context of the curriculum and may occur in the classroom, the library, or at home with 24/7 accessibility to a wide range of resources, technologies, and services. The integrated library program philosophy requires an open schedule that includes flexible and equitable access to physical and virtual collections for staff and students. The PARENTS advocate for a library program that provides their child with access 24/7.

3 Quick Lesson Plan Ideas That Utilize Technology Letting students use technology to create presentations, reports, journals, etc., can be an easy way to introduce technology in a lesson plan or project. Guest Post by Rebecca Garland If you’ve been teaching longer than a few years, you already know that it can be tricky to be a “perfect” teacher all the time. Unfortunately the lack of planning time and huge amounts of expectations in the classroom create a challenge when it comes time to work in some technology-based lessons. Rather than just blowing off improving technology in the classroom, you should look for ways to use it more simply. GoAnimate.com – It’s an animation website (wait, don’t panic!) Once they are signed in, they should create an animation in one of the available “worlds” to perhaps summarize a book or short story, deliver a speech they have written, teach a lesson on a particular topic or introduce themselves or their ideas to the class. Voki.com – Another great, simple website that students can jump right into.

Ethical Issues ALA's Position Statement on the Confidentiality of Library Records The ethical responsibilities of librarians, as well as statues in most states and the District of Columbia, protect the privacy of library users. This statement outlines the beliefs of the American Library Association on the issue of patron confidentiality. American Library Association Code of Ethics The ALA Code of Ethics are the principles that guide the work of librarians, other professionals providing information services, library trustees, and library support staffs. The principles are expressed in broad statements which provide a framework to guide ethical decision making. IFLA's World Code of Ethics by Country The International Federation of Library Association and Institutions monitors the state of intellectual freedom within the library community world-wide. Its site contains papers and lectures as well as global versions of library codes of ethics. Privacy in School Library Programs American Library Association.

A revised manifesto Thank you all for the kind feedback you offered for my rant a few days back. As I wrote that response, in the back of my mind I considered a few realities: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. It is critical that we demonstrate and share. Back in October, I revised the little Manifesto I worked on a couple of years ago for my VOYA column. Please share, add, or pull it apart in your comments. Manifesto for 21st Century School Librarians My prompt: A couple of summers back a young school librarian, fresh out of library school, asked a very honest question at one of our state retreats: We’re all doing different stuff. Well into the 21st century, it is clear that the concept of modern teacher librarian practice is not clear. What I know for sure is that if the Joyce who graduated from library school in 1976 (and again with a school specialty in 1988), heck, if the Joyce from the 2007/2008 school year, were to visit my library today, she would be stunned by the differences in my/our practice. Reading 1. 2. ● You lead.

The flipping librarian One of the things I am getting ready to do in September is to help a growing number of interested teachers flip. Just in case you’ve missed it, many educators are thinking about flipping. What is flipping? Flipping the classroom changes the place in which content is delivered. Flipping frees face-to-face classroom time for interactive and applied learning, activities that inspire critical thinking, exploration, inquiry, discussion, collaboration, problem solving. According to teachers Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams, considered by many the co-founders of the movement, the Flipped Classroom begins with one question: What’s the best use of your face-to-face class time? In this short video, Sams explains the rationale behind his shift in classroom practice: For much more information and a conceptual model, read the work of Jackie Gerstein and follow her Flipped Classroom Scoop.it. Does flipping work? Of 453 flipped educators surveyed: Flipping for differences Flipping is not outsourcing 1. 2. 3.

Creating Classrooms We Need: 8 Ways Into Inquiry Learning | MindShift | KQED News If kids can access information from sources other than school, and if school is no longer the only place where information lives, what, then happens to the role of this institution? “Our whole reason for showing up for school has changed, but infrastructure has stayed behind,” said Diana Laufenberg, who taught history at the progressive public school Science Leadership Academy for many years. Laufenberg provided some insight into how she guided students to find their own learning paths at school, and enumerated some of these ideas at SXSWEdu last week. 1. BE FLEXIBLE. Laufenberg recalled a group of tenacious students who continued to ask permission to focus their video project on the subject of drugs, despite her repeated objections. 2. Laufenberg’s answer: Get them curious enough in the subject to do research on their own. “Rather than saying, ‘We’re going to study immigration,’ I took them through a process where they become interested in it themselves,” she said. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

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