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The flipping librarian

The flipping librarian
One of the things I am getting ready to do in September is to help a growing number of interested teachers flip. Just in case you’ve missed it, many educators are thinking about flipping. What is flipping? Flipping the classroom changes the place in which content is delivered. Flipping frees face-to-face classroom time for interactive and applied learning, activities that inspire critical thinking, exploration, inquiry, discussion, collaboration, problem solving. According to teachers Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams, considered by many the co-founders of the movement, the Flipped Classroom begins with one question: What’s the best use of your face-to-face class time? In this short video, Sams explains the rationale behind his shift in classroom practice: For much more information and a conceptual model, read the work of Jackie Gerstein and follow her Flipped Classroom Scoop.it. Does flipping work? Of 453 flipped educators surveyed: Flipping for differences Flipping is not outsourcing 1. 2. 3.

http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2012/08/14/the-flipping-librarian/

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The Flipped Class Manifest Photo: Document with Red Line by Dukeii (Editor's Note: The conversation and interest in the flipped class continues . . . From our very first post about this topic in January 2011 to date (3/30/13), The Daily Riff has received 250,000+ views to related posts which are linked below - extending to over 100 countries. Today's post is authored by eight notable advocates for the flipped classroom.

Flipping the Library: Tips from Three Pros Through the use of innovative technologies and online resources, school libraries can now be available to students wherever—and whenever—they need them. “Flipped” or blended learning offers students the power of personalized instruction, through a mix of virtual and face-to-face interactions, at a student’s own pace. Embracing this concept is a must for student engagement and the future of the profession, say school librarians Joyce Valenza, Brenda Boyer, and Michelle Luhtala.

Flipping the Classroom: A revolutionary approach to learning presents some pros and cons Illustration by Brian Stauffer Back in 2007, two high school science teachers in Woodland Park, CO, decided to try a “crazy idea.” “We said, ‘What if we stopped lecturing and committed all our lectures to videos?’” says Jon Bergmann, now the lead technology facilitator at the Joseph Sears School in Kenilworth, IL.

The Flipped Classroom Guide for Teachers As technology becomes increasingly common in instruction at all levels of education from kindergarten to college, the modern classroom is changing. The traditional teacher-centered classroom is falling away to give students a student-centered classroom where collaborative learning is stressed. One way educators are effectively utilizing online learning and changing the way they teach is by flipping their classrooms. What is a Flipped Classroom? High school teachers Aaron Sanns and Jonathan Bergman were the first to flip their classrooms.

Position Statement on Flexible Scheduling The library program is fully integrated into the educational program so that students, teachers, and school librarians become partners in learning. This integration strengthens the teaching for learning process to insure students are active learners who guide and continually assess their learning process. Open access to a quality school library program is essential for students to develop the vital skills necessary to analyze, evaluate, interpret, and communicate information and ideas in a variety of formats. Inquiry skills are taught and learned within the context of the curriculum and may occur in the classroom, the library, or at home with 24/7 accessibility to a wide range of resources, technologies, and services. The integrated library program philosophy requires an open schedule that includes flexible and equitable access to physical and virtual collections for staff and students.

Flipping the Library: Tips from Three Pros Through the use of innovative technologies and online resources, school libraries can now be available to students wherever—and whenever—they need them. “Flipped” or blended learning offers students the power of personalized instruction, through a mix of virtual and face-to-face interactions, at a student’s own pace. Embracing this concept is a must for student engagement and the future of the profession, say school librarians Joyce Valenza, Brenda Boyer, and Michelle Luhtala.

The Flipped Classroom Model: A Full Picture Due to Khan Academy’s popularity, the idea of the flipped classroom has gained press and credibility within education circles. Briefly, the Flipped Classroom as described by Jonathan Martin is: Flip your instruction so that students watch and listen to your lectures… for homework, and then use your precious class-time for what previously, often, was done in homework: tackling difficult problems, working in groups, researching, collaborating, crafting and creating. Classrooms become laboratories or studios, and yet content delivery is preserved. Flip your instruction so that students watch and listen to your lectures… for homework, and then use your precious class-time for what previously, often, was done in homework: tackling difficult problems, working in groups, researching, collaborating, crafting and creating. Classrooms become laboratories or studios, and yet content delivery is preserved (

The School Library Media Specialist: Overview The teacher librarian must be prepared for a wide variety of leadership roles in the learning community. These multifaceted roles require a thirst for knowledge and a commitment to on-going professional development. The library media specialist has many roles and responsibilities including teacher, instructional partner, information specialist, and program administrator (Information Power, p. 4-5). Teacher. The teacher librarian must be an effective educator and curricular leader.

Threats to Construct Validity « PreviousHomeNext » Before we launch into a discussion of the most common threats to construct validity, let's recall what a threat to validity is. In a research study you are likely to reach a conclusion that your program was a good operationalization of what you wanted and that your measures reflected what you wanted them to reflect. Would you be correct? How will you be criticized if you make these types of claims? Flipped Theology: Flipping Your Classroom Increases Learning I love the face-to-face interaction of the classroom, and while nothing will ever replace it, there are advantages to using the internet for teaching. The world is changing. The way people learn is changing. Learning Standards & Common Core State Standards Crosswalk Skip to main content ALA User Menu Search form A Division of the American Library Association You are at: ALA.org » AASL » Learning Standards & Program Guidelines » Learning Standards & Common Core State Standards Crosswalk Share this page:

What’s our future – school libraries and librarians It disturbs me that we are not seriously thinking about the future of school libraries. This statement will receive incensed objections; teacher librarians are, after all, talking about changes in what we do and how we do it at conferences and in their own libraries. We talk about some of these changes in my own school library – delivering ebooks, providing transferable skills such as critical literacies to our students, delivering online resources. Well shoot me down if I upset you but I still think we’re not getting it. We can’t make changes to our libraries and continue to hold onto the way we’ve always done it. I seriously think we’ll be out of a job soon unless we move along with public libraries and transform what we’re doing.

Learning Standards & Program Guidelines Review and Revision For the first time in decades AASL will be using a multi-layered survey, data, and research approach to revise and rewrite its learning standards and program guidelines for your profession. To ensure the standards meet the needs of the entire community it is critical that we hear from you! Visit the FAQ section for more information on how you can get involved. Overview | Project Plan Milestones | Frequently Asked Questions School Technology Needs Assessment (STNA) - SERVE Center at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro BackgroundThe School Technology Needs Assessment (STNA, say "Stenna") was originally developed by SEIR*TEC at SERVE in collaboration with the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction's Educational Technology Division, as part of the LANCET project (Looking at North Carolina Educational Technology). The STNA was created to help building-level planners collect and analyze needs data related to implementation of the NC IMPACT technology integration model, as well as other contemporary frameworks for examining technology use in teaching and learning. The STNA is typically accessed through a web address unique to each school, using a free online surveying system provided by SERVE. After a the survey has been completed by all staff members, it is closed and the address of a web-based report is provided to the individual responsible for coordinating the needs assessment. A summary of the results of a study on STNA is available from SERVE (PDF).

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