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T E X T F I L E S D O T C O M

T E X T F I L E S D O T C O M
On the face of things, we seem to be merely talking about text-based files, containing only the letters of the English Alphabet (and the occasional punctuation mark). On deeper inspection, of course, this isn't quite the case. What this site offers is a glimpse into the history of writers and artists bound by the 128 characters that the American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) allowed them. The focus is on mid-1980's textfiles and the world as it was then, but even these files are sometime retooled 1960s and 1970s works, and offshoots of this culture exist to this day.

http://textfiles.com/

Related:  gifs, read, n´ cool stuffInternet Archaeologylittérature numérique

iPad Simulator Please How would you rate us? CrapAwesome If you are having issues on "slide to login", double click the slider button Please show your support for our hosting fee by clicking on some ads. The Great Works of Software — The Message Is it possible to propose a software canon? To enumerate great works of software that are deeply influential—that changed the nature of the code that followed? Canons emerge over time, as certain works gain in critical appreciation. Mel's Hole 15 years ago, a strange man named Mel Waters called in to the Art Bell radio program, claiming he had discovered a mysterious and infinite hole on his property near Ellensburg, Washington. Quickly dubbed Mel's Hole, the strange legend of the never-ending pit and its paranormal characteristics spiraled farther and farther. When skeptics looked more closely, they discovered that no man named Mel Waters ever lived near Ellensburg. To this day the hole's existence and the man's true identity remain unverified. When Waters first called in to the program he claimed to have found a hole that by his calculations, was greater than 80,000 feet.

How I came to find Linux I saw my first Sun workstation in the winter of 1992, when I was an undergraduate at Purdue University. At the time, I was a student in the Krannert School of Management, and a childhood love of computers had just been reawakened by a mandatory computer programming course I had taken during the fall semester (we were given the choice between COBOL and FORTRAN—which even in 1992 seemed highly dated—and I had picked COBOL because it seemed the more “business” of the two). Ten years or so earlier, my father, a professor of entomology at Purdue, had replaced his typewriter at work with an Apple II+. Thinking his nine-year-old son might get a kick out of it, he brought it home one weekend along with a Space Invaders-like game he had bought at the local ComputerLand.

High Strangeness Kansas - Jeff Templin is a amateur photographer. He says he's seen it all until now. While taking pictures of wildlife back in February, something caught his eye. He said it looked like an unusual contrail. "Right over the city, clear as a bell," said Templin. "Anyone that was looking up would have seen it. bits.blogs.nytimes The march of progress in computing is a climb. Each big step forward is also a step up, so that communication is further away from the machine, more on human terms. And each time, the number of people who can use computing increases dramatically. At first, programming languages were the medium of communication between man and machine. Fortran, the breakthrough computer language, was designed to resemble the algebraic formulas familiar to scientists and engineers — reasonably enough, since they were the only people anyone could imagine using the relative handful of giant calculating machines back then.

How do I love thee? Let me Instagram it In 2013, Lang Leav self-published a small debut poetry collection, Love & Misadventure, online. Two years later, she was meeting her fans on a book tour in the Philippines. “It was insane,” she says. Why Warp Drives Aren't Just Science Fiction Astrophysicist Eric Davis is one of the leaders in the field of faster-than-light (FTL) space travel. But for Davis, humanity's potential to explore the vastness of space at warp speed is not science fiction. Davis' latest study, "Faster-Than-Light Space Warps, Status and Next Steps" won the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics' (AIAA) 2013 Best Paper Award for Nuclear and Future Flight Propulsion. TechNewsDaily recently caught up with Davis to discuss his new paper, which appeared in the March/April volume of the Journal of the British Interplanetary Society and will form the basis of his upcoming address at Icarus Interstellar's 2013 Starship Congress in August. [Super-Fast Space Travel Propulsion Ideas (Images)]

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